WOJNAROWICZ — LOTRINGER — SCEMAMA

Following a screening of DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA, Lotringer and Amy Scholder will join Hedi El Kholti for a conversation about Scemama’s film and Wojnarowicz’s life and work.*

The film intercuts footage from Lotringer‘s extensive 1989 interview with Wojnarowicz—itself filmed by Scemama—with documents from the artist’s estate and papers, and Scemama’s personal archives.

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA

Tuesday, February 19, at 7:30 pm.

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

*At the recent Berlinale, the film screened under the title SELF-PORTRAIT IN 23 ROUNDS: A CHAPTER IN DAVID WOJNAROWICZ’S LIFE, 1989–1991.

David Wojnarowicz. Images courtesy Marion Scemama.

FLORENCE LAZAR

A Florence Lazar retrospective YOU THINK THE EARTH IS A DEAD THING… is now on view at Jeu de Paume.

It’s title evoking the “ecological ravages of colonialism” and the “emancipatory potential of history,” the exhibition features Lazar’s new video work 125 HECTARES (2019), as well as her photographic portraits and previous films, including LES PAYSANS (2000) and KAMEN (LES PIERRES) (2014).

FLORENCE LAZAR—

YOU THINK THE EARTH IS A DEAD THING…

Through June 2.

Jeu de Paume

1 place de la Concorde, 8th, Paris.

From top: Florence Lazar, Jeune militant, 2008, photograph; Florence Lazar, 125 hectares, 2019, video; Florence Lazar, Confessions d’un jeune militant, 2008, video; Florence Lazar, Les Femmes en noir, 2002, video; Florence Lazar, Kamen (Les Pierres) , 2014, film; Florence Lazar, Socialisme ou barbarie, 2008, photograph. Photographs courtesy the artist, FMAC, Cnap Paris, and Jeu de Paume. Film and video images courtesy the artist, Sister Productions, Fort du Bruissin, and Jeu de Paume.

JEAN-LUC GODARD — THE IMAGE BOOK

Johnny “Guitar” Logan (Sterling Hayden): Don’t go away.

Vienna (Joan Crawford): I haven’t moved.

Johnny: Tell me something nice.

Vienna: Sure. What do you want to hear?

JohnnyLie to me. Tell me all these years you’ve waited. Tell me.

Vienna“All these years I’ve waited.”

Johnny: Tell me you’d have died if I hadn’t come back.

Vienna: “I would have died if you hadn’t come back.”

Johnny: Tell me you still love me like I love you.

Vienna: “I still love you like you love me.”

Johnny: Thanks. [Takes another drink.] Thanks a lot.

The cinema of Jean-Luc Godard—unmatched in its longevity and rigor—is a history of versions, revisions, and doubles, and his new work The Image Book (Le livre d’image) is a filmmaker’s autobiography by a cineaste whose curiosity shows no sign of flagging. The film has five sections, referencing the fingers of a hand, and borrows from a century of footage, including clips from his own durational Histoire(s) du cinéma.

As in all of Godard’s work, standards of continuity, editing, and sound-and-image sync are distorted or discarded. Flows of knowledge and experience are interrupted and memory is questioned. When Godard’s screen turns blank, we can daydream. But when the soundtrack drops out, a chill descends and the world falls through an abyss of silence.

“A truth in art is that which the opposite is also true.” — Oscar Wilde

For Godard, truth appears in fragments. When it comes to the truth, it would be arrogant to think otherwise. In The Image Book, his use of the “lie to me” conversation from Nicholas Ray’s 1954 film Johnny Guitar speaks to something we demand of cinema, something to do with hope. Film is always eluding us—”running away,” as Raymond Bellour wrote. It’s an act of abandonment by a thousand cuts, relieved only by the assurance that there is so much more to come.

The Image Book is screening twice daily at the American Cinematheque’s Aero Theatre for the next five days. You’ll want to see it more than once.

THE IMAGE BOOK

Daily at 7:30 pm and 9:40 pm. Sunday matinee at 4 pm.

Through Thursday, February 21.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Jean-Luc Godard, The Image Book/Le livre d’image, courtesy Kino Lorber.

FELIX AND FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Sales are good, tickets are selling out, events are full, and the sun is shining—although a brief shower is forecast for midday Sunday—so the inaugural edition of Frieze Los Angeles should be followed by many more.

We hope Felix returns, too. Co-founded by Morán Morán brothers Al and Mills and collector Dean Valentine, it’s an intimate fair headquartered in Hollywood.

FELIX

Through Sunday, February 17.

Hollywood Roosevelt

7000 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

An Arthur Jafa edition of Name That Tune has been added to today’s Frieze Talks, and the fair will close on Sunday with Miranda July and Maggie Nelson in conversation.

When you’re out on the Paramount studio backlot in the Frieze Projects section, stop by the Sqirl/Acid-Free space for Sqirl Away to-go items from the Los Feliz restaurant as well as a selection of art books and periodicals, including Liz Craft’s …my life in the sunshine—published by DoPe Press—and the new print issue of PARIS LA.

FRIEZE LOS ANGELES

Through Sunday, February 17.

Paramount Pictures Studios

5515 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles.

From top: Ken Price, Return to LA, 1990, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Florian Morlat, collage, courtesy of the artist and The Pit (Frieze Los Angeles); Jessi Reaves installation at Felix, courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York; Kristen Morgin, Jennifer Aniston’s Used Book Sale (detail), ceramic, courtesy the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art (Felix); David Hockney, Peter Showering, 1976, C print, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks (Frieze Los Angeles); Nan Goldin, Blue, 2016, courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman (Frieze Los Angeles).

LIZ LARNER AND ARIANA REINES IN CONVERSATION

Liz Larner—whose exhibition at Regen Projects opens in May 2019—and Ariana Reines—author of the forthcoming collection A Sand Book—get together for a late afternoon talk on the final day of this year’s Frieze Los Angeles.

LIZ LARNER and ARIANA REINES IN CONVERSATION

Sunday, February 17, at 5 pm.

Paramount Pictures Studios

Sherry Lansing Theatre

5515 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles.

(Enter on Gower or Van Ness.)

From top: Liz Larner, photograph by Daniel Marlos, courtesy Larner and Regen Projects; Liz Larner, iv (inflexion), 2014–15, ceramic, epoxy, pigment, stones, and minerals, courtesy the artist; Ariana Reines, photograph courtesy Reines and Frieze.