THE WOLVES

In Sarah DeLappe‘s THE WOLVES, we listen in on a girls’ soccer team as they go through their pregame stretch and practice sessions, trading high school gossip, snark about their education (“Why would you, like, watch a documentary?”), and disdain for their alcoholic coach—a rapid-fire, scattershot mix of earnest support and toxic insult.

During the play’s first half, DeLappe—who is still in her twenties, and for whom teenspeak is clearly a love/hate proposition—does not cut her subjects any slack. The girls tie themselves into so many careless, clueless verbal knots that THE WOLVES might initially be mistaken for an anti-Millennial tract. But the streams of quotidian wordplay that link the girls soon work a similar magic on the audience: moment by resonant moment, we are bound in the instant.

Near the end of the piece, tragedy—unforeseen and, as the girls point out, totally avoidable—strikes the team, after which they reunite for one more game. The furious updates and competitive status checks give way to an elegiac mood of reflection. Losing none of their individuality, the girls find their emotional footing in the group. “We are the Wolves!,” they jump and cheer, and we are together.

The excellent cast—directed by Alana Dietze—perfectly captures the arrogance and awkwardness of adolescence. This Los Angeles premiere production of THE WOLVES—a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize—will be on the boards for another month.

THE WOLVES

Fridays, Saturdays, and Mondays at 8 pm.

Sundays at 4 pm.

Through April 22.

Echo Theater Company

Atwater Village Theatre

3269 Casitas Avenue, Los Angeles.

From top: Troy Leigh-Anne Johnson (left), team captain Connor Kelly-Eiding, and Jacqueline Besson in The Wolves; Besson; Kelly-Eiding and Makeda Declet; Ellen Neary (left), Katherine CronynDonna Zadeh, and Minzi; Neary, Zadeh, Caitlin Zambito, Minzi, Declet, Johnson; Neary and Zambito; Zambito. Photographs by Darrett Sanders.

PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA AT TEAM

The work of Paul Mpagi Sepuya can be seen on both coasts this spring, with a solo show at Team Gallery and a joint exhibition with Sheree Hovsepian at Team Bungalow.

PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA—THE CONDITIONS

Through April 13.

Team Gallery

83 Grand Street, New York City.

SHEREE HOVSEPIAN and PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA

Through April 21.

Team Bungalow

306 Windward Avenue, Venice Beach.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya, The Conditions, from top: Mirror Study (0X5A7394); A Portrait (0X5A8325); Drop Scene (0X5A8165). Sheree Hovsepian and Paul Mpagi Sepuya, from top: Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Portrait Study (_1980812); Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Darkroom Mirror (_2100693). Images courtesy the artist and Team Gallery.

ALICE NEEL — FREEDOM

Two years after Alice Neel, Uptown, David Zwirner presents ALICE NEEL—FREEDOM, another great exhibition of the painter’s work, this time focused on Neel’s portrayal of the nude figure.

The show’s catalogue features contributions by Marlene Dumas, Helen Molesworth, and Ginny Neel, Alice’s daughter-in-law and the organizer of FREEDOM.

ALICE NEEL—FREEDOM

Through April 13.

David Zwirner

537 West 20th Street, New York City.

From top: Alice Neel, Pregnant Julie and Algis, 1967; Alice Neel, Degenerate Madonna, 1930; Alice Neel, Untitled (Alice Neel and John Rothschild in the Bathroom), 1935; Alice Neel, Bronx Bacchus, 1929; Alice Neel, Joe Gould, 1933. All artwork © The Estate of Alice Neel, courtesy The Estate of Alice Neel and David Zwirner.

FINAESTAMPA — ILLUSTRATION AND FASHION

FINAESTAMPA—ILLUSTRATION AND FASHION features the work of nearly two dozen artists, including François Berhoud, Blair Breitenstein, Jason Brooks, Helen Bullock, Gill Button, Cecilia Carlstedt, Jean-Philippe Delhomme, David Downton, Ricardo Fumanal, Laura Gulshani, Mats Gustafson, Richard Haines, Amelie Hegardt, Richard Kilroy, Jordi Labanda, Tanya Ling, Jowy Maasdamme, Inés Maestre, Rosie McGuinness, Aurore de la Morinerie, Hiroshi Tanabe, and Unskilled Worker.

The exhibition is complemented by a fully illustrated catalogue.

FINAESTAMPA—ILLUSTRATION AND FASHION

Through May 19.

Museo ABC

Amaniel 29–31, Madrid.

From top, left to right, artwork by Gill Button, Rosie McGuiness, Aurore de la Morinerie, Amelie Hegardt, Richard Kilroy, Laura Gulshani, Mats Gustafson, Richard Haines, François Berthoud, and Blair Breitenstein. Images courtesy the artists and Museo ABC.

HARMONY KORINE IN CONVERSATION

“I am always thinking about the cinema experience. That’s why I haven’t made television yet. Television is a writer’s medium. Not to say there aren’t good things in it, but television—no matter how good it is—is underwhelming. The size of it, and sitting in your living room. It’s pedestrian, whereas cinema is magic, it’s huge, it envelops you, and there’s something completely sensory when it works.” — Harmony Korine

On the eve of the release of The Beach Bum—his sixth feature—join Korine in Hollywood this week for two nights of double features and between-film conversations.

This American Cinematheque presentation of Korine’s films from the last twenty years includes his masterpiece Spring Breakers. All films will be screened in 35mm.

GUMMO and JULIEN DONKEY-BOY

Tuesday, March 19, at 7:30 pm.

TRASH HUMPERS and SPRING BREAKERS

Wednesday, March 20, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Rachel Korine in Spring Breakers; Bunny Boy in Gummo; Ewen Bremner in Julien Donkey-Boy; Trash Humpers. Images courtesy the artist, A24, Warner Bros., and Drag City.