TOKYO STORY

If, in our century, something sacred still existed, if there were something like a sacred treasure of the cinema, then for me that would have to be the work of Yasujiro Ozu… Never before and never again since has the cinema been so close to its essence and its purpose: to present an image of man in our century, a usable, true and valid image in which he not only recognizes himself, but from which, above all, he may learn about himself. — Wim Wenders

Ozu’s TOKYO STORY—starring the great Setsuko Hara and voted the “greatest film of all time” in a 2012 Sight & Sound poll—will screen this week at the Aero as part of the American Cinematheque’s new Tuesday Matinee series.

TOKYO STORY

Tuesday, August 20, at 1 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Yasujiro Ozu, Tokyo Story, from top: cast; Chishû Ryû (left) and Setsuko Hara; Chieko Higashiyama and Hara; Sô Yamamura (left) and Haruko Sugimura; Hara and Ryû; cast.

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF—a group show of women artists at Morán Morán, curated by Eve Fowler—is on view for one more week.

This highly recommended exhibition includes the work of Etel Adnan, Frances Barth, Donna Dennis, Florence Derive, Simone Fattal, Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Barbara Hammer, Harmony Hammond, Maren Hassinger, Suzanne Jackson, Virginia Jaramillo, Harriet Korman, Joyce Kozloff, Magali Lara, Mary Lum, Mónica Mayer, Dona Nelson, Senga Nengudi, Howardena Pindell, and Joan Semmel.

“The title of the show is from a Gertrude Stein text that Fowler selected for its ambiguous poetry that she felt honored the artists.”

I’m not asking the artists to tell me anything, but they allowed me in their studios—a private place where artists often feel vulnerable. — Eve Fowler*

PLEASE RECALL TO ME EVERYTHING YOU HAVE THOUGHT OF*

Through August 24.

Morán Morán

937 North La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Please Recall to Me Everything You Have Thought Of, curated by Eve Fowler, Morán Morán, 2019, from top: Howardena Pindell, Untitled #51, 2010, mixed media on board, courtesy Garth Greenan Gallery; Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Untitled, 1972, glazed stoneware; Senga Nengudi, Rapunzel, 1981, silver gelatin print; Suzanne Jackson, finding joy in the mirror, 2016, acrylic, wood veneer, Bogus paper, loquat seeds, courtesy of O-Town House; Donna Dennis installation view; Florence Derive, Blue Manuscript, 2017, oil on raw linen; Maren Hassinger, Whole Cloth, 2017, photograph on fabric; Barbara Hammer, South Fork Yuba River, California, 1973, 2017, silver gelatin print, courtesy of Company Gallery; Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 16mm film transferred to video with sound; Harmony Hammond, Aperture #6, 2013, monotype on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Simone Fattal, Woman as Tree (1), 2010, porcelain, courtesy of Kaufmann Repetto; Frances Barth, A Tiny Pinch, 2017, acrylic on gessoed wood panel; Joan Semmel, Untitled, 2016, oil crayon on paper, courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates; Dona Nelson, Luka, 2015, acrylic and mixed media on canvas, courtesy of Michael Benevento; Etel Adnan, Mount Tamalpais, 2013, ink on handmade paper (2), courtesy of Callicoon Fine Arts; Mary Lum, Informations Practiques, 2019, acrylic on paper; Virginia Jaramillo, Visual Theorems 15, 1979, linen fiber with hand-ground earth pigments, courtesy of Hales Gallery; Harriet Korman, Untitled, 2016–18, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artists and Morán Morán.

PERFORMANCE PRACTICE PASSION

Los Angeles Performance Practice presents PASSION, a new work “exploring the space that our desire and longing inhabit while rehearsing perseverance.”

Taking Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent film La passion de Jeanne d’Arc as a point of departure,  Rachel Jendrzejewski and Zoe Aja Moore “collaborate to create an embodied investigation of the fraught relationship between feminism and emotion, from Joan of Arc’s day to current political moments.”*

PASSION will be performed by Dorothy Dubrule, Jessica Emmanuel, Brigid Gallagher, Mireya Lucio, and Gabriella Rhodeen—recently seen at Redcat in Paradise Island—and the one-night-only event features recorded excerpts of a live score by Julia Holter for Dreyer’s film, performed by Holter, Corey Fogel, Devin Hoff, Dina Maccabee, and Tashi Wada.

PASSION*

Sunday, August 18.

Doors at 6 pm, performance at 7 pm.

The Theatre at Ace Hotel

929 South Broadway, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Los Angeles Performance Practice, Passion; Maria Falconetti in La passion de Jeanne d’Arc (1928), directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer (2); Mireya Lucio in Passion rehearsal, photograph by Chris Kuhl. Passion images courtesy and © the photographers, the performers, and Los Angeles Performance Practice.

CARLA 17 LAUNCH

The launch party for CARLA 17 is this weekend at Park View / Paul Soto.

The new issue includes features on Donna Huanca, David Hammons, Ragen Moss, and collectors and Gemini G.E.L. founders Elyse and Stanley Grinstein.

Concurrent with the launch is AUTOMATIC DOOR, a group show featuring the work of Victoria Colmegna, Andy GiannakakisAidan Koch, Mark McKnight, Dylan Mira, Alex Olson, Matt Paweski, Autumn Ramsey, Mark A. Rodriguez, Kate Spencer Stewart, J. Parker Valentine, and Willa Wasserman.

CARLA ISSUE 17 LAUNCH

Saturday, August 17, from 5 pm to 8 pm.

Park View / Paul Soto

2271 West Washington Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Carla issue 17 (3); Carla issue 1. Images courtesy and © Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles.

OSCAR TUAZON — MICHIGAN WATER SCHOOL

This is the closing weekend for OSCAR TUAZON—WATER SCHOOL at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.

“In 1968, engineer and inventor Steve Baer self-published the Dome Cookbook, a treatise on mathematics, do-it-yourself architecture, and off-the-grid living. Three years later he created his Zome Home in the foothills overlooking Albuquerque. The house remains one of the earliest modern examples of passive solar architecture; the sun’s energy is collected during the day and stored in drums of water installed in large, bay windows, which then provide heat during the night.

“This unique structural system, and the larger countercultural DIY building and environmental movements of the 1960s and 1970s, form the basis for Tuazon ’s latest conceptual and material research. For his exhibition at MSU Broad—curated by Steven L. Bridges—Tuazon continues his investigations of the relationship between art, architecture, and environmental sustainability, with specific consideration of the exhibition’s immediate context: Michigan and the Great Lakes region.”*

The Water School has grown out of thinking about what role art making can play in building community and culture. Oscar Tuazon

“As the title suggests, Tuazon will initiate the latest version of his Water School, while also bridging the conversation in Michigan with the artist’s schools in California and Minnesota. These schools are spaces for formal and informal learning, opportunities to specifically address water, land rights, and other socio-environmental issues, connecting local concerns with national and global conversations.”*

OSCAR TUAZON—WATER SCHOOL*

Through August 18.

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University

547 East Circle Drive, East Lansing.

Above images: Oscar Tuazon, Water School, Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, 2019, photography by Eat Pomegranate Photography. Below: Oscar TuazonZome Alloy, 2016, plywood, aluminum sheeting, and hardware, courtesy and © the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich.