Author Archives: Barlo Perry

ART-RITE LAUNCH

Join ART-RITE founding co-editor Walter Robinson, Pat Steir, Robin Winters, moderator Carlo McCormick, and host Jeffrey Deitch for a panel discussion and launch of the facsimile reprint of ART-RITE.

Collected in a 600-plus-page volume, this co-publication of Primary Information and Printed Matter contains all twenty issues of the newsprint magazine edited by Robinson, Edit DeAk, and Joshua Cohn—who would leave after issue 7—between 1973 and 1978.

(DeAk, Robinson, Sol LeWitt, and Lucy Lippard were among Printed Matter’s 1976 co-founders.)

Contributors to ART-RITE included Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, Bas Jan Ader, Laurie Anderson, David Antin, John Baldessari, Jennifer Bartlett, Gregory Battcock, Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Christian Boltanski, AA Bronson, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Chris Burden, Daniel Buren, Scott Burton, Ulises Carrión, Judy Chicago, Lucinda Childs, Christo, Diego Cortez, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Ralston Farina, Richard Foreman, Peggy Gale, Gilbert and George, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Leon Golub, Guerrilla Art Action Group, Julia Heyward, Nancy Holt, Ray Johnson, Joan Jonas, Richard Kern, Lee Krasner, Shigeko Kubota, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Babette Mangolte, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Rosemary Mayer, Annette Messager, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Brian O’Doherty, Genesis P-Orridge, Nam June Paik, Charlemagne Palestine, Judy Pfaff, Lil Picard, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, David Salle, Julian Schnabel, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Sylvia Sleigh, Jack Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson, Holly Solomon, Naomi Spector, Nancy Spero, Pat Steir, Frank Stella, David Tremlett, Richard Tuttle, Alan Vega, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Hannah Wilke, Robert Wilson, and Irene von Zahn.

ART-RITE PANEL and LAUNCH

Tuesday, December 10, at 7 pm.

Jeffrey Deitch

18 Wooster Street, New York City.

From top: Art-Rite (2); Edit DeAk, photograph by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Walter Robinson, photograph by Greenfield-Sanders; Art-Rite facsimile reprint cover; Art-Rite cover by Christo; Art-Rite launch card. Images courtesy and © the photographer, Walter Robinson, Primary Information, and Printed Matter.

CHARLES GAINES — MANIFESTOS 3 IN PERFORMANCE

In conjunction with the exhibition CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS, the artist’s MANIFESTOS 3—”a multimedia installation that functions as a systematic transliteration of two revolutionary manifestos into musical notation”—will be performed by pianist Richard Valitutto at Hauser and Wirth in Los Angeles.*

An interpretation of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1967 speech at Newcastle University and James Baldwin’s 1957 essay “Princes and Powers”—a report from the famous 1956 Sorbonne conference of black writers—this MANIFESTOS 3 premiere will be followed by a conversation with Gaines and a book signing of the artist’s current exhibition catalog.

MANIFESTOS 3 BY CHARLES GAINES*

Tuesday, December 10, at 7:30 pm.

CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS

Through January 5.

Hauser and Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Charles Gaines, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen; Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967 at Newcastle University; James Baldwin; Charles Gaines, Manifestos 3 (detail), 2018, photograph by Nilsen; Richard Valitutto; Numbers and Trees: Palm Canyon, Palm Trees Series 2, Tree #7, Mission (detail), 2019, acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, photograph, two parts, photograph by Nilsen. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, and Hauser & Wirth.


VARDA BY AGNÈS AT THE AERO

Three words are important to me: inspiration, creation, and sharing… I don’t care if my films make money. I care that my films are seen and are loved. Agnès Varda

“My mother was very funny—left wing but not politically correct. We traveled a lot together. She was so curious and she loved gossip. Qui baise qui?

“Agnès was 89 when we started VARDA BY AGNÈS. She had lung cancer and we could only work three hours a day. This film was so difficult, going from the editing room to the hospital to the editing room…

“My mother would say, Don’t complain too much. Do it. We work hard, but it should look easy. We should not show the ‘work.’ Rosalie Varda, Agnès’ daughter and a co-producer of VARDA BY AGNÈS, in conversation with Ava DuVernay*

Agnès Varda didn’t like or use the word “master” to refer to herself or her work—what she called her cinéma écriture—but VARDA BY AGNÈS, her final film, is undeniably a master class in cinema, and a “characteristically playful, profound, and personal summation of the director’s own brilliant career.”

Now playing at the Aero Theatre, these American Cinematheque screenings of VARDA BY AGNÈS will be introduced by a variety of guests, including Illeana Douglas, Julie Delpy, Chloe King, Lisa Blok-Linson, Lynne Littman, Jim McBride, and Peter Debruge. See link below for details.

VARDA BY AGNÈS

Through December 11.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

*Rosalie Varda and Ava DuVernay in conversation, Array 360° Film Series, November 2, 2019, Array Campus, Los Angeles.

From top: Agnès Varda on the set of Uncle Yanco (1967); Varda, behind camera, shooting her first feature La Pointe court (1955); Silvia Monfort and Philippe Noiret in La Pointe court; Alain Resnais and Varda editing the film; Corinne Marchand, Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962); Le Bonheur (1965); Varda, Visages Villages (2017), co-directed by Varda and JR; Varda and Jean “Yanco” Varda, Uncle Yanco; Kathleen Cleaver in Black Panthers (1968); James Rado (left), Viva, and Gerome Ragni in Lions Love (…and Lies) (1969); Varda by Agnès (2019) (2); Jeanne Moreau (left), Hanna Schygulla, and Michel Piccoli (as Simon Cinéma) in One Hundred and One Nights (1995); 72nd Festival de Cannes tribute poster, 2019; Varda by Agnès. Images courtesy and © Ciné Tamaris, MK2, Criterion, and Janus Films.

PAULINE BOUDRY AND RENATE LORENZ — MOVING BACKWARDS

We do not feel represented by our governments and do not agree with decisions taken in our name. We witness European nations building giant walls and fences around borders that already didn’t seem useful in the first place, rejecting rescue ships at the harbors. Philosopher Achille Mbembe speaks of the “Society of Enmity.” Queer scholar José Esteban Munoz calls the here and now a “prison house.” People stop using gender neutral language and move from their polyamorous groups into traditional families. Hate speech not only seems acceptable, but becomes a motor of aggressively arresting us into what is considered a normal life. Do you sometimes feel as if you are massively being forced to move backwards?

We have, of course, no recipe. But after taking a deep breath we are up for turning disadvantage into a tool: Let’s collectively move backwards…

Women of the Kurdish guerrillas wore their shoes the wrong way round to walk from one place in the snowy mountains to the other. This tactic saved their lives. It seems as if you are walking backwards, but actually you are walking forwards. Or the other way around.

Let’s take this story as a starting point for the project: Can we use the tactical ambivalence of this movement as a means of coming together, re-organizing our desires, and finding ways of exercising freedoms? Can its feigned backwardness even fight the notion of progress’ inevitability?

We will move backwards and think about the ways in which we wish to live with loved but also unloved others. We will move backwards, because strange encounters might be a pleasant starting point for something unforeseen to happen. — Renate and Pauline

This weekend, Joan presents the United States premiere of Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz’ 2019 Venice Biennale video installation MOVING BACKWARDS.

The Venice iteration in the Swiss Pavilion—curated by Charlotte Laubard—incarnated a nightclub environment, and the opening weekend in Los Angeles will feature a live performance by Marbles Jumbo Radio.

PAULINE BOUDRY and RENATE LORENZ—MOVING BACKWARDS

Opening Night

Saturday, December 7, from 7 pm.

PAULINE BOUDRY and RENATE LORENZ IN CONVERSATION WITH ANNE ELLEGOOD

Sunday, December 8, at 4 pm.

Performances

Opening Night at 7 pm and Sunday, December 8, from noon to 4 pm.

Joan

1206 Maple Avenue, suite 715, downtown Los Angeles.

In addition to Marbles Jumbo Radio, performers in the video include Julie Cunningham, Werner Hirsch, Latifa Laâbissi, and Nach.

The MOVING BACKWARDS exhibition catalog is available from Skira.

Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz, Moving Backwards, 2019, installation and performance photographs from the 58th Venice Biennale, Swiss Pavilion. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, the performers, la Biennale di Venezia, and Skira.

MARIA LASSNIG — NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980—restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation and the Austrian Film Museum—comprise live-action and documentary footage, and “enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.” (New York Diary)

These films were largely never finished, nor shown in the artist’s lifetime, which perhaps accounts for their frankness, a type of elucidate meditation on the artistic process, life in the studio, and the psychologies, lives, and bodies of Lassnig’s friends and colleagues. As such, the films of this period become essential to understanding the shift within Lassnig’s practice, which occurred around 1970 following the artist’s move to New York from Vienna in 1968, to be “in the country of strong women.”* Shifting her focus from the personal to that of the body and its relations, her reaction to the sensory overload of Manhattan was not so much an abandonment of an earlier practice of “body sensation” drawings and the subsequent “body awareness” paintings, but rather a redefinition of a transposed body within a cultural and civic environment.**Mary L. Coyne

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

Friday, December 6, at 12:15 pm.

Arthouse Piccadilly

Mühlebachstrasse 2, Zürich.

*Maria LassnigThe Pen is the Sister of the Brush: Diaries 1943-1997, edited by Hans Ulrich Obrist (Göttingen: Steidl; Zürich: Hauser and Wirth, 2009).

**Wolfgang Dreschler, “About the intimate link between the pained and the painter,” in Maria Lassnig (Vienna: Museum moderner Kunst, Ludwig Foundation, 1999).

Maria Lassnig, from top: Kopf (circa 1976); Stonelifting: A Self Portrait in Progress (1971–1974) (2); Moonlanding / Janus Head (1971–1972). Images courtesy and © the Maria Lassnig Foundation.