Author Archives: Barlo Perry

MIRANDA JULY AND SPIKE JONZE IN CONVERSATION

My feeling is that, regardless of how we grew up socioeconomically, most of us grew up sort of siloed. We grew up within these constructions that we couldn’t really see were constructions—they seemed like the whole world. I guess I leaned into the righteousness that arises when we’re siloed in that way. There’s a nasty, villainous, slightly evil righteousness to this particular family [in KAJILLIONAIRE], but I think even the most well-meaning righteousness ultimately fails children. I mean, your parents will have misinformed you because they can only speak about life as they knew it, and you will betray them because you will not continue to live the way that you once lived as a child in that family. The inherent betrayal in that, and the resulting heartbreak, is what I was writing from. I tore through the first draft of the script never once thinking about my own family. They’re not literal, but for me they’re more resonant because of that. There’s this kind of ache. — Miranda July*

Join Miranda July and Spike Jonze in virtual conversation as they discuss July’s new film KAJILLIONAIRE.

To r.s.v.p. for this event—presented by the American Cinematheque—see link below.

MIRANDA JULY and SPIKE JONZE IN CONVERSATION

Monday, September 28.

7:30 pm on the West Coast; 10:30 East Coast.

KAJILLIONAIRE

Now playing in select cinemas.

*Miranda July, interview by Nick Haramis, Interview, September 18, 2020.

Miranda July, Kajillionaire (2020), from top: Evan Rachel Wood; Gina Rodriguez (left) and Wood; Richard Jenkins, Debra Winger (center), and Wood; Wood; Rodriguez; Kajillionaire U. S. poster; Wood; Rodriguez and Wood; Jenkins, Winger, and Wood; Miranda July. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, and Focus Features.

BETYE SAAR — CALL AND RESPONSE VIRTUAL TOUR

BETYE SAAR—CALL AND RESPONSE—an exhibition curated by Carol S. Eliel at LACMA that traces the genesis between Saar’s preliminary notebook sketches and her finished work—is now on view in Manhattan.

This week, Morgan curator Rachel Federman will present a virtual guided tour of the show.

BETYE SAAR—CALL AND RESPONSE

Through January 31, by appointment.

RACHEL FEDERMAN: BETYE SAAR—CALL AND RESPONSE VIRTUAL TOUR

Friday, September 25.

Noon on the West Coast; 3 pm East Coast.

The Morgan Library and Museum

225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street), New York City.

Betye Saar, from top: Sketchbook page from U.S.A., Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe, 1988–1991, watercolor and ballpoint pen; sketchbook page for ​The Weight of Buddha​, 2013, ballpoint pen, colored pencil, and wash; installation view, Betye Saar: Call and Response, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, September 22, 2019–April 5, 2020 (closed in March 2020 after pandemic shutdown), image courtesy and © the artist and Museum Associates / LACMA; Sketchbook (1970–1972); sketchbook page from 2009–2010; sketchbook page for Eyes of the Beholder, November 6, 1994. Images courtesy and © the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles.

MOU TUN-FEI — THE END OF THE TRACK

LACMA, the Taiwan Academy in Los Angeles, and the Taiwan Film and Audiovisual Institute present a rare virtual screening of THE END OF THE TRACK, the second feature by Mou Tun-fei.

Unreleased in its day and unseen for decades, The End of the Track now takes its rightful place as an early landmark of Taiwanese queer and independent cinema.*

The film will be preceded by Mou’s I Didn’t Dare Tell You. A post-screening conversation will include Ryan Pin-Hung Cheng and LACMA film curator Adam Piron.

THE END OF THE TRACK*

Friday, September 25, from 10 am to 10 pm, PDT.

Mou Tun-Fei, The End of the Track (1970), images courtesy and © the Taiwan Film and Audiovisual Institute.

EMMA WOLF-HAUGH — DOMESTIC OPTIMISM

DOMESTIC OPTIMISM—a show by Emma Wolf-Haugh—opens this month in Austria.

An exhibition about mangled and mistold modernist legacies, the project begins with furniture, inanimate objects that come loaded with social connections and invisible histories. Through the displacement of cultural detritus Wolf-Haugh retells modernist architectural history in the collective key of queer-feminist and decolonial practices, continually unearthing filth in times of hygiene, and complicating things that were never simple to begin with.*

EMMA WOLF-HAUGH—DOMESTIC OPTIMISM

ACT ONE—MODERNISM: A LESBIAN LOVE STORY*

Opening: Thursday, September 24, 3 pm to 7 pm.

Exhibition on view through November 20.

Grazer Kunstverein

Palais Trauttmansdorff

Burggasse 4, Graz.

Emma Wolf-Haugh, Domestic Optimism, Act One—Modernism: A Lesbian Love Story, Grazer Kunstverein, September 24, 2020–November 20, 2020. Images courtesy and © the artist.

HILTON ALS AND MARY WANG IN CONVERSATION

For this season’s inaugural Miscellaneous Files event—in association with the School of Visual Arts’ Curatorial Practice program—Hilton Als will join Guernica senior editor Mary Wang in conversation.

Hilton Als once called the essay “a form without a form”—a description equally applicable to his work as a staff writer and theater critic for The New Yorker, but also to his work as a curator. For this virtual studio visit, writer and editor Mary Wang will use clips from films foundational to Als’ practice to discuss the formal transgressions in his work and how such methods can help bring muddled presents into shape.*

A FORM WITHOUT A FORM—HILTON ALS IN CONVERSATION WITH MARY WANG*

Wednesday, September 23.

5 pm on the West Coast; 8 pm East Coast.

This event will be held via Zoom. To receive a link to attend, please RSVP to macp@sva.edu with your name and the event you plan on attending.

From top: Hilton Als, photograph by Dominique Nabokov, image courtesy and © the photographer and Als; Mary Wang, courtesy and © the photographer and Wang; Marlene Dumas, Hilton Als, 2018, from the series Great Men, 2014–present, courtesy and © the artist and David Zwirner.