Author Archives: Barlo Perry

THEASTER GATES AT RICHARD GRAY

“The work is not about a social mission. It is about sculpture and how things I believe in manifest through the material world.” — Theaster Gates

Gates new gallery exhibition EVERY SQUARE NEEDS A CIRCLE explores the artist’s interest in “poetics and the history of objects”—including “architectural excerpts from Chicago”—and continues his engagement with the inspirational works and teachings of W.E.B. Du Bois.

THEASTER GATES—EVERY SQUARE NEEDS A CIRCLE

Through June 29.

Richard Gray Gallery, Gray Warehouse

2044 West Carroll Avenue, Chicago.

Theaster Gates, Every Square Needs a Circle, Richard Gray Gallery, 2019, from top: Installation view; Black Rainbow, 2019; installation view; Alls my life I have to fight, 2019; Progress Mill, 2018. Images courtesy of the artist and Richard Gray Gallery.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

The paintings of Ben Shahn, Antonio Berni, Raquel Forner, Honoré Sharrer, and Pavel Tchelitchew, the photography of Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, the sculpture of Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, the ballet costumes of Kurt Seligmann, Paul Cadmus, and Jared French, the music of Virgil Thomson, and the philosophy of George Gurdjieff

… all come together in LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN, the Museum of Modern Art exhibition devoted to the writer, critic, curator, patron, and impresario who set the aesthetic template for MOMA and brought George Balanchine to America to establish the New York City Ballet.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

Through June 15.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

This summer MOMA‘s West 53rd Street location will close for four months—June 15 through October 21—for reconstruction.

From top: George Platt LynesLincoln Kirstein, circa 1948, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes; Paul Cadmus, set design for the ballet Filling Station, 1937, cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941, © 2018 estate of Paul Cadmus; Walker EvansRoadside View, Alabama Coal Area Town, 1936, gelatin silver print, printed circa 1969 by Charles RodemeyerMuseum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the artist, © 2019 Walker Evans Archive, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Paul CadmusBallet Positions, drawing for the primer Ballet Alphabet, 1939, ink, pencil, colored ink, and gouache on paper (letters reversed on drawing), Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein, © 2019 estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel TchelitchewHide-and-Seek. 1940–42, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Harvard Society for Contemporary Art pamphlet. 1931–32, Harvard Society for Contemporary Art scrapbooks, vol. 2 (Autumn 1930–33), Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York; Ben ShahnBartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco, 1931–32, gouache on paper on board, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of Ben Shahn / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Pavel Tchelitchew, study for a backdrop for the ballet Apollon Musagète, 1942, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein; George Platt LynesLew Christensen in Apollon Musagète, June 24, 1937, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes.


MERCE CUNNINGHAM — NIGHT OF 100 SOLOS

On Tuesday, in celebration of what would have been Merce Cunningham‘s 100th birthday, the Merce Cunningham Trust will present NIGHT OF 100 SOLOS—A CENTENNIAL EVENT.

In three venues—first at London’s Barbican, then at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and finally at UCLA—an 80-minute performance of 100 overlapping solos will be overseen by Merce Cunningham Dance Company alumni as the work of the late, great choreographer continues to invigorate the canon and astonish new generations.

“This Event, and the longstanding, continuing partnerships with these three premier organizations, are true signs that the Cunningham legacy is alive and well ten years after his passing.” — Ken Tabachnick, executive director of the trust

In Los Angeles, the event will be staged by Andrea Weber—a dancer with the company from 2004 to 2011—with Dylan Crossman. Jennifer Steinkamp designed the set at Royce Hall, and Jessica Wodinsky is the lighting designer.

Madison Greenstone, Bethan Kellough, Stephan Moore, Stephanie Richards, and Suzanne Thorpe will provide live musical accompaniment, organized by Stephan Moore.

The dancers for the Los Angeles section are Paige Amicon, Barry Brannum, Lorrin Brubaker, Rena Butler, Tamsin Carlson, Erin Dowd, Katherine Helen Fisher, Joshua Guillemot-Rodgerson, Casey Hess, Thomas House, Laurel Jenkins, Burr Johnson, Vanessa Knouse, Cori Kresge, Brian Lawson, Jessica Liu, Victor Lozano, Daniel McCusker, Polly Motley, Jermaine Maurice Spivey, Savannah Spratt, Pam Tanowitz, Ros WarbyRiley Watts, and Sam Wentz, with Cemiyon Barber and Una Ludviksen as understudies.

NIGHT OF 100 SOLOS—A CENTENNIAL EVENT

Tuesday, April 16, at 8 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

From top: Gerda Peterich, Merce Cunningham in Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of Three (detail), 1952; Robert Rauschenberg, Untitled [Merce (III)] , 1953, courtesy of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation; Andrea Weber at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2012, dancing Cunningham as part of the exhibition Dancing Around the Bride, photograph by Constance Mensh; Cunningham (2).

DASH SNOW — THE DROWNED WORLD

“Dash [Snow] and David Hammons are both artists with a witch-doctor feel to their work, which is important, because ultimately what is the value of art?… In an increasingly secular society, it’s even more important as people try to form their belief systems. If you’re not going the readymade route, then you look around for the tools available to make something of your own. That’s a big part of the artist’s job or the writer’s job…

“It’s found in the moment, not in an academic way. You find it in the practice. I think the academic and institutional part of the art world is a big problem. Artists often collaborate with them to their detriment, because they think they need the institution as a go-between, a translator for the public. Dash, like Hammons, understood that you don’t need the middleman. Cut out the middleman. Make him wait in line with everyone else. It has to be on the artist’s terms.” — Glenn O’Brien on Dash Snow*

The new exhibition THE DROWNED WORLD presents work from the late artist’s archive, including a selection of rarely seen sculptures.

DASH SNOW—THE DROWNED WORLD

Through May 12.

Participant Inc

253 East Houston Street, New York City.

*”I Don’t Believe in Masterpieces AnywayGlenn O’Brien on Dash Snow,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

See David Rimanelli on Snow.

Dash Snow, from top: Mixed-media sculpture, 2000–2009; The Drowned World: Selections from the Dash Snow Archive, 2019, installation view, Participant Inc, New York, photograph by Mark Waldhauser; Untitled, 2000–2009, Polaroid (Kunle Martins (left) and Snow); Untitled (Past, Present), 2006, mixed-media sculpture; Untitled, 2007, collage; Untitled (Her Kisses Were Dangerous), 2006–2007, collage. Images © Dash Snow, courtesy of the Dash Snow Archive, New York City and Participant Inc. Special thanks to Lia Gangitano.

KRAFTWERK — DANCE FOREVER

The exhibition KRAFTWERK—DANCE FOREVER—drawn from the collection of Toby Mott—documents the visual side of the highly influential electronic ensemble.

On view this weekend at Arcana are the promotional materials, sheet music, obsolete recorded media, posters, photographs, and musical toys that so distinguished the German ensemble’s aesthetic values.

The evening will feature Kraftwerk-themed musical sets by Rose Knows and Sean Horton, and Kraftwerk shirts and bags designed by Alex McWhirter.

Copies of the nearly 100-page, limited-edition catalogue—signed by Mott, who is attending the event—will be available.

KRAFTWERK—DANCE FOREVER

Saturday, April 13, from 5 pm to 9 pm.

Arcana—Books on the Arts

8675 Washington Boulevard, Culver City.

From top: Kraftwerk, materials designed by Toby Mott (2); Kraftwerk. Images courtesy the artists and Arcana Books.