Author Archives: Barlo Perry

HOWARDENA PINDELL

Howardena Pindell’s retrospective exhibition WHAT REMAINS TO BE SEEN is now on view at Brandeis in Massachusetts.

HOWARDENA PINDELL—WHAT REMAINS TO BE SEEN

Through May 19.

Rose Art Museum

Brandeis University

415 South Street, Waltham.

From top: Howardena Pindell, Untitled #20 (Dutch Wives Circled and Squared), 1978 (detail), mixed media on canvas; Howardena Pindell, Night Flight, 2015–2016, mixed media on canvas; Howardena Pindell, Video Drawings: Swimming, 1975, chromogenic print; Howardena Pindell, Untitled #5B (Krakatoa), 2007, mixed media on paper collage. Images courtesy the artist, Garth Greenan Gallery, New York, and MCA Chicago.

JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

“My beautiful city is set on rock between two flowing paths of water that run to the sea. My city is tall and jagged—with gold-slated towers… My city chokes on its breath, and sparkles with its false lights—and sleeps restlessly at night. My city is a lone man walking at night down an empty street watching his shadow grow longer as he passes the last lamp post, seeing no comfort in the blank, dark windows, and hearing his footsteps echo against the building and fade away.” — Jerome Robbins

Admired, disparaged, beloved, feared, Jerome Robbins (1918–1998) was one of the great choreographers of the twentieth century. Arthur Laurents told Robbins he was “a shit” for naming names as a “friendly witness” for HUAC. (Robbins feared being exposed as bisexual.) Yet Laurents continued to collaborate with him, most notably on West Side Story. (Stephen Sondheim, the show’s lyricist, said that Robbins was one of the only geniuses he’d ever worked with.)

Through his work with the American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet, and on Broadway—On the Town, Gypsy, and Fiddler on the Roof, to name just three shows among dozens—Robbins was indelibly associated with his home base and muse: Manhattan.

A new exhibition curated by Julia Foulkes marks Robbins’ centenary and his lifelong celebration of the city, and includes dance films and videos, diaries, paintings, story scenarios, press clippings, and extensive photographic documentation.

VOICE OF MY CITY—JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

Through March 30.

New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York City.

From top: Sharks and Jets dance in West Side Story, on tour in Europe in the early 2000s; the original Fancy Free cast—Muriel Bentley, Janet Reed, Harold Lang, John Kriza, and Jerome Robbins—in Times Square in 1958, with photographer Gordon Parks leaning over his tripod, courtesy the Jerome Robbins Dance Division/The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Mikhail Baryshnikov in the New York City Ballet production of The Four Seasons (1979), choreographed by Robbins; Antoinette Sibley rehearses Afternoon of a Faun with the choreographer, photograph by Michael Childers, courtesy Dance Magazine; Damian Woetzel and Tiler Peck dance Robbins at Kennedy Center, 2017; Carmen de Lavallade, Robbins, and Yves Saint Laurent—photograph by Whiteside—and Robbins in 1944, both courtesy Dance Magazine.

GLENN LIGON AND HAMZA WALKER IN CONVERSATION

Join Glenn Ligon and Hamza Walker for a conversation at Regen Projects, where Ligon’s show UNTITLED (AMERICA)/DEBRIS FIELD/SYNECDOCHE/NOTES FOR A POEM ON THE THIRD WORLD will be up through Sunday.

The exhibition includes the large neon Notes for a Poem on the Third World, which is based on a tracing of the artist’s hands, and the first in a series of works inspired by an unrealized film project by Pier Paolo Pasolini.

GLENN LIGON AND HAMZA WALKER IN CONVERSATION

Wednesday, February 13, at 7 pm.

GLENN LIGON—UNTITLED (AMERICA)/DEBRIS FIELD/SYNECDOCHE/NOTES FOR A POEM ON THE THIRD WORLD

Through February 17.

Regen Projects

6750 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Glenn Ligon, photograph courtesy the artist; Glenn LigonNotes for a Poem on the Third World (chapter one), 2018, neon and paint; Glenn Ligon, Debris Field (Red) #3, 2018, etching ink and acrylic on canvas; Hamza Walker, courtesy the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Glenn LigonSynecdoche (For Byron Kim), 2018, neon. Artwork images courtesy the artist and Regen Projects.

GRACE WALES BONNER

The public presentation of MUMBO JUMBOGrace Wales Bonner’s Autumn/Winter 2019 collection that shares a title with Ismael Reed’s revolutionary 1972 novel—will conclude A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS, Wales Bonner’s exhibition at the Serpentine.

Throughout this final week of the show, the dancer and performance artist Michael-John Harper will take residence within the gallery and perform a daily ritual of movements.

Exploring “magical resonances within black cultural and aesthetic practices” through improvised installations and shrines, A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS also incorporates the work of Chino AmobiBlack Audio Film Collective, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, David Hammons, Michael-John Harper, Liz Johnson Artur, Rashid Johnson, Kapwani Kiwanga, Klein, Laraaji, Eric N. Mack, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Ben Okri, Ishmael Reed, Sahel Sounds, and Wales Bonner.

GRACE WALES BONNER—A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS

Through February 16.

Serpentine Sackler Gallery

West Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

Exhibition booklet.

From top: Eric N. Mack, Capital Heights, 2019, in Grace Wales Bonner—A Time for New Dreams, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, 2019; Rashid Johnson, Untitled (daybed 1), 2012; Wales Bonner; Grace Wales Bonner, Everything’s for RealLiz Johnson Artur, There is only one…one, 2019. Images courtesy the artists and the Serpentine Galleries.

MALCOLM LE GRICE IN LOS ANGELES

Malcolm Le Grice—”one of the most compellingly original and radical artist-theorists in the history of the post-war moving image”—will be in Los Angeles for the next week or so.

During this rare visit Le Grice and Los Angeles Film Forum will present his work around town in a series of venues, including the world premiere of the new edit of his immersive multi-screen piece FINITO at the Spielberg Theatre.

See links below for locations. Le Grice—author of Experimental Cinema in the Digital Age— will be on hand to talk with the audience at all three programs.

MALCOLM LE GRICE AT USC

Thursday, February 14, at 7 pm.

USC School of Cinematic Arts 

Broccoli Theatre

900 West 34th Street, Los Angeles.

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MALCOLM LE GRICE—HERE AND NOW

Sunday, February 17, at 7:30 pm.

Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

MALCOLM LE GRICE—BEFORE AND AFTER CINEMA

Monday, February 11, at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Malcolm Le Grice, Berlin Horse (1970); Malcolm Le GriceHorror Film 1 (1971); Le Grice presenting his work in Europe, early 2000s; Malcolm Le Grice, Marking Time, 2015; Malcolm Le Grice, Reign of the Vampire, 1970; Le Grice in the early 1970s; Malcolm Le Grice, Threshold (1972). All images © Malcolm Le Grice and courtesy the artist.