Category Archives: ARCHITECTURE

BAUHAUS — BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST

In conjunction with BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, open for one more week at Getty Center, BAUHAUS—BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST is an online exhibition that “offers an in-depth look into the school’s novel pedagogy.”*

Following the end of World War I, the provisional government of the short-lived Free State of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach in Germany initiated an effort to reestablish two schools, the Weimar School of Applied Arts (Weimar Kunstgewerbeschule) and the neighboring Academy of Fine Arts (Hochschule für bildende Kunst), as a single, unified institution…

Upon the recommendation of Belgian architect Henry van de Velde, who had previously directed the Weimar School of Applied Arts, the Berlin architect Walter Gropius was invited to head the new school. Gropius’ request to rechristen the institution under a new name, BAUHAUS STATE SCHOOL (Staatliches Bauhaus), was approved in March 1919.*

BAUHAUS—BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST*

Online exhibition in conjunction with

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Postcard sent to Jan Tschichold with aerial photograph of Bauhaus Dessau, Walter Gropius, architect, 1926, photograph by Junkers Luftbild, 1926, gelatin silver print on postcard, Jan and Edith Tschichold Papers, 1899–1979; Vassily Kandinsky, Color Triangle, circa 1925–1933, graphite and gouache on paper, Vassily Kandinsky Papers, 1911–1940; students in a workshop at the Bauhaus Dessau (2), photographer(s) unknown, undated, gelatin silver prints; Erich Mzozek, Still-life drawing with analytical overlay, circa 1930, graphite on paper and vellum, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Geometric study of spiral form, artist unknown, undated, graphite and colored graphite on paper; Friedl Dicker, Light-dark contrast study for Johannes Itten’s Preliminary Course, 1919, charcoal and pastel collage on black paper. ; Pamphlet for Farben Licht-Spiele (Color-light plays), Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack, 1925, letterpress, Bauhaus Typography Collection, 1919–1937, © Kaj Delugan; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek. All images courtesy and © the Bauhaus-Archiv and the Getty Research Institute.

ALVIN BALTROP

For [Alvin] Baltrop, who for a time lived in a van parked along New York City’s Hudson River, the waterfront was more like a second home. Looking at photographs of so many naked bodies sprawled out on the docks on a summer day, we might think we were witnessing the radical democratization of men. We can be sure that some of the waterfront pleasure seekers experienced it that way, but Baltrop was always keenly aware of the inequalities embedded in queer life and in the gay civil rights movement.Jonathan Weinberg, Pier Groups

“Although initially terrified of the piers, I began to take these photos as a voyeur [and] soon grew determined to preserve the frightening, mad, unbelievable, violent, and beautiful things that were going on at that time. To get certain shots, I hung from the ceilings of several warehouses utilizing a makeshift harness, watching and waiting for hours to record the lives that these people led (friends, acquaintances, and strangers), and the unfortunate ends that they sometimes met…

“The casual sex and nonchalant narcotizing, the creation of artwork and music, sunbathing, dancing, merrymaking, and the like habitually gave way to muggings, callous yet detached violence, rape, suicide, and, in some instances, murder. The rapid emergence and expansion of AIDS in the 1980s further reduced the number of people going to and living at the piers, and the sporadic joys that could be found there.” — Alvin Baltrop*

[Baltrop] photographed constantly at the Hudson River piers from 1975 to 1986, and the thousands of negatives from that project constitute his chief photographic legacy. He risked much to work there. In order to spend more time at the piers, he gave up his job as a taxi driver and became a self-employed mover. Often he stayed for days on end, living out of his moving van parked nearby. In spite of the remarkable documentary and aesthetic value of what he accomplished, Baltrop was almost completely unsuccessful at getting his work exhibited during his lifetime.Douglas Crimp

The Bronx Museum show THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALVIN BALTROP features over 200 photographs as well as the first public exhibition of Baltrop’s personal archive. The show was curated by Sergio Bessa, and a catalog is available from Skira.

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALVIN BALTROP

Through February 9, 2020.

Bronx Museum of the Arts

1040 Grand Concourse, The Bronx.

*Alvin Baltrop, manuscript for Ashes from a Flame: Photographs by Alvin Baltrop, edited by Randal Wilcox.

See Ed Halter on Baltrop.

Alvin Baltrop, from top: The Piers (Man Sitting and Smoking), circa1975–1986, gelatin silver print; The Piers (Collapsed Warehouse), circa 1975–1986; The Piers, circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Male Drinking with Cigarette), circa 1975-1986; The Piers, circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Man from Behind), 1977–1978, silver gelatin print; The Piers (exterior view of Day’s End), 1975-8; Pier 52 (Gordon Matta-Clark’s Day’s End), 1975–1986, silver gelatin print, Bronx Museum of the Arts permanent collection; The Piers (4), circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Open Window), circa 1975-86. Images courtesy and © the Alvin Baltrop Trust, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York, Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Third Streaming, New York.

OSCAR TUAZON — MICHIGAN WATER SCHOOL

This is the closing weekend for OSCAR TUAZON—WATER SCHOOL at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.

“In 1968, engineer and inventor Steve Baer self-published the Dome Cookbook, a treatise on mathematics, do-it-yourself architecture, and off-the-grid living. Three years later he created his Zome Home in the foothills overlooking Albuquerque. The house remains one of the earliest modern examples of passive solar architecture; the sun’s energy is collected during the day and stored in drums of water installed in large, bay windows, which then provide heat during the night.

“This unique structural system, and the larger countercultural DIY building and environmental movements of the 1960s and 1970s, form the basis for Tuazon ’s latest conceptual and material research. For his exhibition at MSU Broad—curated by Steven L. Bridges—Tuazon continues his investigations of the relationship between art, architecture, and environmental sustainability, with specific consideration of the exhibition’s immediate context: Michigan and the Great Lakes region.”*

The Water School has grown out of thinking about what role art making can play in building community and culture. Oscar Tuazon

“As the title suggests, Tuazon will initiate the latest version of his Water School, while also bridging the conversation in Michigan with the artist’s schools in California and Minnesota. These schools are spaces for formal and informal learning, opportunities to specifically address water, land rights, and other socio-environmental issues, connecting local concerns with national and global conversations.”*

OSCAR TUAZON—WATER SCHOOL*

Through August 18.

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University

547 East Circle Drive, East Lansing.

Above images: Oscar Tuazon, Water School, Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, 2019, photography by Eat Pomegranate Photography. Below: Oscar TuazonZome Alloy, 2016, plywood, aluminum sheeting, and hardware, courtesy and © the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich.


ISAAC JULIEN — LINA BO BARDI

ISAAC JULIEN: LINA BO BARDI—A MARVELLOUS ENGAGEMENT is the British artist and filmmaker’s nine-screen installation in tribute to the great Brazilian architect.

“Linear time is a western invention; time is not linear, it is a marvellous entanglement, where at any moment points can be chosen and solutions invented without beginning or end.” — Lina Bo Bardi*

ISAAC JULIEN: LINA BO BARDI—A MARVELLOUS ENGAGEMENT*

Through July 27.

Victoria Miro

16 Wharf Road, Hoxton, London

ISAAC JULIEN in conversation with MARIA BALSHAW

Friday, July 5, at 6:30 pm.

Tate Britain

Millbank, London.

Isaac Julien—Lina Bo Bardi: A Marvellous Engagement, Victoria Miro, 2019, installation views. Images courtesy and © the artist and Victoria Miro. Isaac Julien limited edition cover courtesy and © the artist and Wallpaper.

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.