Category Archives: ART

NAYLAND BLAKE’S GENDER DISCARD PARTY

Join Marvin Astorga, Nao Bustamante, Ron Athey, Robert Crouch, Jennifer Doyle, Jamillah James, Young Joon Kwak, Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, and Bradford Nordeen at Zebulon for an evening of performance, music, and dance at Nayland Blake’s FIRST INTERNATIONAL INTERGENERATIONAL GENDER DISCARD PARTY.

The event marks the closing day of Blake’s ICA LA exhibition NO WRONG HOLES—THIRTY YEARS OF NAYLAND BLAKE.

DISGENDER EUPHORIA—NAYLAND BLAKE’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL INTERGENERATIONAL GENDER DISCARD PARTY

Sunday, January 26, from 8 pm to midnight.

Zebulon

2478 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

From top: Nayland Blake; Nayland Blake, Untitled, 2000, charcoal on paper; Nao Bustamante as Conchita, photograph by Austin Young; Nayland Blake, Kit No. 7 (Flush), 1990, rubber gloves, stainless steel cups, belt, hose, shelf, books; Xina Xurner, photograph by Austin Young. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, and ICA LA.

DO YOU KNOW WHERE THE CHILDREN ARE?

As a native Texan, I have witnessed firsthand the discrimination that immigrants face in the United States. I have heard from friends who visited detention centers, and from lawyers representing those detained. I have heard the stories of those who are separated from their families, and read transcripts from underfunded courtrooms operating far beyond capacity. It is devastating. That all of this occurs in the name of “security” and “safety” is the greatest farce of all. Molly Gochman

DO YOU KNOW WHERE THE CHILDREN ARE (DYKWTCA) is a call to action and exhibition of over 100 unique works of art by 100+ leading visual artists that is organized by the artists and activists Mary Ellen Carroll and Lucas Michael. Each work incorporates, or represents an actual account (in whole or in part) from a child who was separated from their family and detained by the U.S. government. This text may be in the native language of the child or a translation into English. The accounts are taken from the interviews that were conducted by the Flores investigators that included legal, medical and mental health experts who visited the detention facilities six months ago in June of 2019. Upon witnessing the deplorable, inhumane, and illegal conditions they found the children in, they decided it was necessary to act upon their findings. They went public.*

The exhibition—WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED…,curated by Ruth Noack—will open this weekend in Washington, D.C., and proceeds from artwork sales will benefit and support the Safe Passage Project, Terra Firma, Team Brownsville, and the Innovation Law Lab.

WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED…*

Through March 29.

Opening night: Saturday, January 25, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

The Corner at Whitman-Walker

1701 14th St. NW, Washington, D.C.

When We First Arrived…, artwork, from top: Spencer Ostrander, Ricci Albenda, Mary Lum, Molly Gochman, Rob Pruitt, Terence Gower, Jesse Presley Jones, When We First Arrived invitation card, Amy Sillman, Beto De Volder and Leon Villagran, Kay Rosen, and Carlos Motta. Artwork courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, DYKWTCA, Mary Ellen Carroll, and Lucas Michael.

SAMUEL BECKETT — QUAD I AND II AT THE HAMMER

As part of the citywide Eurydice Found program, the Hammer Museum presents three live performances of Samuel Beckett’s wordless, percussive teleplays QUAD I and QUAD II, first broadcast in Germany in 1981.

QUAD brings together the representational conventions of ritual, computational code, and matheme. This television play presents a clear connection between Beckett’s literary convictions, in particular his concept of the “unword” and its avant-garde possibilities, and the role of mathematics in art. The formal connections between the ritualistic, computational, and allegorical dimensions of this television play render QUAD a “hyperstitional” work, one that is composed of twin formal elements: symbols without significance and superstition without belief. The relation between the television play and mathematics is thus not superficial or referential: Beckett’s “hyperstitional” work produces a literary dimension that echoes the temporal and spatial stakes peculiar to twentieth-century mathematics.*

SAMUEL BECKETT—QUAD I and II

Thursday, January 23, at 7:30 pm.

Saturday, January 25, at 2 pm and 4 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*See Baylee Brits, “Ritual, Code, and Matheme in Samuel Beckett’s Quad,” Journal of Modern Literature 40, no. 4 (Summer 2017), pp. 122–133. Published by Indiana University Press.

Samuel Beckett, Quad I and Quad II. Images courtesy and © the writer’s estate and Süddeutscher Rundfunk, Stuttgart, 1981.

MEPHISTO AT THE EGYPTIAN

Adapted from the roman à clef by Klaus Mann (son of Thomas), MEPHISTO—directed by István Szabó and based on Gustaf Gründgens, the great German actor, extreme political opportunist, and Klaus’ former brother-in-law—traces the simultaneous rise and fall of Hendrik Höfgen, a leftist thespian (played by Klaus Maria Brandauer) who becomes the toast of Nazi Berlin for his portrayal of Goethe ’s Mephistopheles.

“In the energy they bring to the film, Brandauer and Szabó have made a mighty statement, but it is as much about acting, I think, as Nazism. In Höfgen, we see an empty man, standing for nothing. This doesn’t even bother him.” — Roger Ebert

This week at the Egyptian, the American Cinematheque and Kino Lorber present a screening of the 4K restoration of MEPHISTO—winner of the Academy Award for Best-Foreign Language film—on a double bill with the 4K restoration of Szabó’s Silver Bear winner CONFIDENCE (1980).

MEPHISTO and CONFIDENCE

Friday, January 24, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

István Szabó, Mephisto (1981), from top: Klaus Maria Brandauer (6). Poster is from East German release. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographers, and Kino Lorber.

CONSTANCE MALLINSON IN CONVERSATION

The rise of the feminist movement and the globalism that exposed United States audiences to other cultures were two energizing forces for artist Constance Mallinson, coinciding with the artist’s late-1970s move to Los Angeles. Mallinson worked downtown, creating paintings and drawings that channeled the form and logic of weaving. She focused her attention on employing pattern as a bridge between minimalist aesthetics and a more personal and feminine approach as part of the Pattern and Decoration art movement.

Mallinson joins MOCA assistant curator Rebecca Lowery in a conversation about her practice then, now, and in the context of the exhibition WITH PLEASURE—PATTERN AND DECORATION IN AMERICAN ART 1972–1985.*

CONSTANCE MALLINSON and REBECCA LOWERY IN CONVERSATION*

Thursday, January 23, at 7 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Constance Mallinson, artworks courtesy and © the artist, Jason Vass Gallery, and Edward Cella Art and Architecture. Photograph of Mallinson by Todd Gray, courtesy and © the photographer and Mallinson.