Category Archives: ART

A MADELINE GINS READER

In the 1960s] Madeline Gins… was exploring states of extreme influence, even possession, by literary language. Her way of “deal[ing] with” the displacement of her self by an influx of words was to write in the very space of delay and estrangement that reading and writing produce, to continue this delay, this interruption. She seemed truly not to aspire to any sort of fixed meaning—or, rather, to aspire to unfixing meaning—even as she was quite insistent that she wrote in the novel form. — Lucy Ives

Madeline Gins was marooned here, on Earth, and made the best of it, using what was available to her, like words. This book is a splendid testament to how far she pushed them, and us, to realize what she already knew. That this, all this, is not it. Not. Even. Close. — Paul Chan

The new anthology THE SADDEST THING IS THAT I HAVE HAD TO USE WORDS: A MADELINE GINS READER—published by Siglio—”brings never-before-published poems and essays together with a complete facsimile reproduction of Gins’ WORD RAIN (or A Discursive Introduction to the Intimate Philosophical Investigations of G,R,E,T,A, G,A,R,B,O, It Says) (1969), along with substantial excerpts from her two later books What the President Will Say and Do!! (1984) and Helen Keller or Arakawa (1994). Long out of print or unpublished, Gins’s poems and prose form a powerful corpus of experimental literature, one which is sure to upend existing narratives of American poetics.”*

See link below for details.

THE SADDEST THING IS THAT I HAVE HAD TO USE WORDS: A MADELINE GINS READER, edited and with an introduction by Lucy Ives (Catskill, NY: Siglio Press, 2020).*

From top: Madeline Gins in Tokyo, 1998, image courtesy and © the Reversible Destiny Foundation; Arakawa and Gins, Study for Critical Holder, 1990, image courtesy and © 2018 the Estate of Madeline Gins; Gins, Untitled, n.d.; Gins, Untitled, 1969, published in the Street Works edition of 0 TO 9; The Saddest Thing Is That I Have Had to Use Words: A Madeline Gins Reader, edited by Lucy Ives, image courtesy and © Siglio Press; Arakawa and Gins, Screen-Valve, 1985–1987, image courtesy and © 2018 the Estate of Madeline Gins; Gins, 2007. Images courtesy and © the Reversible Destiny Foundation Archives.

BEATE GÜTSCHOW — S SERIES IN BERLIN

Selections from Beate Gütschow’s S series—her photomontages of monumental urban scenes—are back on view in Berlin.

BEATE GÜTSCHOW

Through May 25.

Berlinische Galerie

Alte Jakobstrasse 124–128, Berlin.

Beate Gütschow, S series, images courtesy and © the artist. Beate Gütschow: S (2009) courtesy Hatje Cantz.

50 + 50 — CHOUINARD TO CALARTS

50 + 50—A CREATIVE CENTURY FROM CHOUINARD TO CALARTS is an artist-led scholarship endowment initiative and exhibition series anticipating the fiftieth anniversary of California Institute of the Arts and the centenary of Chouinard Art Institute, which was founded in 1921.

Fifty artist alumni will participate in the five-year program. The first group of artists includes John BaldessariAnne CollierLaddie John DillJoe GoodeNaotaka HiroTony OurslerGala Porras-KimStephen PrinaBarbara T. Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems

The inaugural group of works were on view this spring at Redcat, and can now be seen in the Frieze Viewing Room, the virtual gallery space of Frieze New York 2020.

And check out the CalArts Expo 2020.

From top: Barbara T. Smith, Invisible, 2018, blown glass, water, and cotton rope; Carrie Mae Weems, Queen B, 2018–2019, archival digital print; Gala Porras-Kim, Composite Artifact, 2019, Southwest stone, foam, acrylic paint, metal, wood. Artworks photographed by Joshua White. CalArts, unknown photographer, circa 1971–1972, black and white photograph, courtesy and © California Institute of the Arts Archives Photographic Materials Collection. Anne Collier, Aura (John Baldessari 2003), 2018, C-print, courtesy of the artist. Images courtesy and © the artists and published for CalArts by Lisa Ivorian-Jones.

THE FILMS OF NANCY HOLT

Friday Films—a project of the Holt / Smithson Foundation—continues with upcoming screenings of Nancy Holt’s PINE BARRENS, the Holt-Robert Smithson collaboration EAST COAST / WEST COAST, and Holt’s THE MAKING OF AMARILLO RAMP.

See links below for details.

FRIDAY FILMS

Film streams begin at 11 am on the West Coast, and end twenty-four hours later.

PINE BARRENS

Friday May 8.

EAST COAST / WEST COAST

Friday, May 15.

THE MAKING OF AMARILLO RAMP

Friday, May 22.

Nancy Holt, from top: The Making of Amarillo Ramp (1973 / 2013); Pine Barrens (1975) (2); Holt and Robert Smithson in East Coast / West Coast (1969, co-directed with Smithson); The Making of Amarillo Ramp (1973 / 2013); Pine Barrens (1975); Sun Tunnels (1978). Images courtesy and © the Holt / Smithson Foundation.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS AND LIZA LOU

This weekend on Instagram Live, Liza Lou—founder of the communal initiative Apartogether—visits Carrie Mae Weems in her studio.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS STUDIO VISIT WITH LIZA LOU

Saturday, May 9.

1 pm on the West Coast; 4 pm East Coast.

Carrie Mae Weems, from top: Wilfredo, Laura, and Me, 2002, gelatin silver print; You Became a Playmate to the Patriarch / And Their Daughter, 1995–1996, C-print with sandblasted text on glass; The Blues, 2017, archival pigment prints; I Looked and Looked to See What so Terrified You, from the Louisiana Project, 2003, courtesy of the Nasher Museum, Duke University. Images courtesy and © the artist and the Jack Shainman Gallery.