Category Archives: ART

MARIA LASSNIG — NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980—restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation and the Austrian Film Museum—comprise live-action and documentary footage, and “enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.” (New York Diary)

These films were largely never finished, nor shown in the artist’s lifetime, which perhaps accounts for their frankness, a type of elucidate meditation on the artistic process, life in the studio, and the psychologies, lives, and bodies of Lassnig’s friends and colleagues. As such, the films of this period become essential to understanding the shift within Lassnig’s practice, which occurred around 1970 following the artist’s move to New York from Vienna in 1968, to be “in the country of strong women.”* Shifting her focus from the personal to that of the body and its relations, her reaction to the sensory overload of Manhattan was not so much an abandonment of an earlier practice of “body sensation” drawings and the subsequent “body awareness” paintings, but rather a redefinition of a transposed body within a cultural and civic environment.**Mary L. Coyne

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

Friday, December 6, at 12:15 pm.

Arthouse Piccadilly

Mühlebachstrasse 2, Zürich.

*Maria LassnigThe Pen is the Sister of the Brush: Diaries 1943-1997, edited by Hans Ulrich Obrist (Göttingen: Steidl; Zürich: Hauser and Wirth, 2009).

**Wolfgang Dreschler, “About the intimate link between the pained and the painter,” in Maria Lassnig (Vienna: Museum moderner Kunst, Ludwig Foundation, 1999).

Maria Lassnig, from top: Kopf (circa 1976); Stonelifting: A Self Portrait in Progress (1971–1974) (2); Moonlanding / Janus Head (1971–1972). Images courtesy and © the Maria Lassnig Foundation.

TEO HERNÁNDEZ — SALOMÉ

For the viewer enamored with arthouse, experimental, experiential and extremely lyrical cinema, it takes less than five minutes to get wholly immersed in this ethereal, boldly unconventional phantasmagoria which eschews historical/biblical narrative in favor of the sensual visuals and chic baroque atmosphere. Although it does feature the Dance of the Seven Veils, SALOMÉ refuses to tell the (familiar) story and instead opts for satiating our appetite for aesthetic pleasure. Ars gratia artis it may be, yet it hardly ever fails to impress, holding you in its gentle embrace…

Its pure, unadulterated magic relies on soft light, warm colors, strong chiaroscuro, deliberate pacing and slow-motion ‘action’ which turns the archetypal characters into partakers of a strange ritual of unfathomable purpose. As Eros and Thanatos dance like they are making love, the ripe darkness that surrounds them engulfs their hypnotized worshippers and drives them into sublime ecstasy. However, it is not only them who are under hypnosis, but us as well, with our gazes transfixed to the screen and ourselves lost in contemplative reveries.Nikola Gocić

Dirty Looks and the Los Angeles Filmforum present a special, one-night-only screening of Teo Hernández’ richly impressionistic take on SALOMÉ at the Philosophical Research Society.

Dorian Wood—fresh off his Redcat incarnation in Xavela Lux Aeterna—will perform a score created for the event, “marrying the operatic evocations of Wood’s singular voice with Hernández’ baroque cinematography in the unique, Mayan-inspired architecture” of the venue.*

SALOMÉ*

Thursday, December 5.

Doors at 7:30 pm, screening at 8 PM.

Philosophical Research Society

3910 Los Feliz Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Teo Hernández, Salomé (1976), images courtesy and © the Teo Hernández Fund, Kandinsky Library, and Centre Pompidou, Paris.

ANNE IMHOF — FAUST RECORD LAUNCH

Join Anne Imhof, Eliza Douglas, Billy Bultheel, and Susanne Pfeffer for a talk, performance, and party celebrating the release of the album FAUST.

Deriving from the performance and exhibition—staged by Imhof at the 57th Venice BiennaleFAUST is part documentation and part elaboration, the sonic capture and extrapolation of the gestures, intensities, and durations of the live event. Serving as the dramatic backbone of the several-hour long performance at the 2017 German Pavilion, the soundtrack was a product of the collective and its individuals, written by Imhof and her collaborators Bultheel, Douglas, and Franziska Aigner.*

FAUST launch, Thursday, December 5*

BILLY BULTHEEL, ELIZA DOUGLAS, ANNE IMHOF, and SUSANNA PFEFFER IN CONVERSATION

6:30 pm.

BULTHEEL, DOUGLAS, and IMHOF PERFORMANCE

8 pm.

Museum für Moderne Kunst

Domstrasse 10, Frankfurt.

FAUST party

BILL KOULIGAS and VILLE HAIMALA

10 pm.

Robert Johnson

Nordring 131, Offenbach.

Anne Imhof, Faust (2019), album images courtesy and © the artists. the performers, the photographers, Museum für Moderne Kunst, and Zak Group. Below: Eliza Douglas in Faust (2017), German Pavilion, 57th Venice Biennale, photograph by Nadine Fraczkowski, courtesy and © the artists, the photographer, and the German Pavilion 2017.

WU TSANG AT ICA

Wu Tsang—the spring 2019 Art Council Chair at the UCLA Department of Art—will give a visiting artist lecture at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

WU TSANG—ARTIST TALK

Wednesday, December 4, at 7 pm.

Institute of Contemporary Art

1717 East 7th Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Wu Tsang, photograph by Maciek Jasik; Wu Tsang, Into a Space of Love, 2018, stills (2), courtesy and © Frieze and Gucci; Fred Moten and Wu Tsang, Who Touched Me? (2018), cover image courtesy and © If I Can’t Dance; Wu Tsang, The Looks, 2015, featuring boychild, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, photograph by Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf; Wu Tsang, Damelo Todo / Odot Olemad, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, photograph by Stefan Alteburger. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, the publishers, Clifton Benevento, Michael Benevento, and Isabella Bortolozzi.

CELIA PAUL

[Celia Paul’s] story is striking. It is not, as has been assumed, the tale of a muse who later became a painter, but an account of a painter who, for ten years of her early life, found herself mistaken for a muse, by a man who did that a lot. [Self-Portrait] is about many things besides [Lucian] Freud: her mother, her childhood, her sisters, her paintings. But she neither rejects her past with Freud nor rewrites it, placing present ideas and feelings alongside diary entries and letters she wrote as a young woman, a generous, vulnerable strategy that avoids the usual triumphalism of memoir. For Paul, the self is continuous (“I have always been, and I remain at nearly sixty, the same person I was as a teenager…. This simple realisation seems to me to be complex and profoundly liberating”), and equal weight is given to “the vividness of the past and the measured detachment of the present.” — Zadie Smith, 2019

Landscapes and portraiture—self- and otherwise—are the focus of an exhibition of paintings by Celia Paul, who has just published an extensively illustrated memoir.

CELIA PAUL

Through December 20.

Victoria Miro Gallery II

16 Wharf Road, London.

CELIA PAUL—SELF-PORTRAIT

2019, Jonathan Cape.

Celia Paul, from top: Self-Portrait, Early Summer, 2018, oil on canvas; Self-Portrait, 1983, ink on paper; Kate in White, Spring, 2018 (detail), oil on canvas; Room and Tower, 2019, oil on canvas; 2016 photograph of Paul in her London studio by Gautier Deblonde; My Sisters in Mourning, 2015–16, oil on canvas; Last Light on the Sea, 2016; Celia Paul, Self-Portrait (2019), cover image courtesy and © Jonathan Cape; Lucian and Me, 2019, oil on canvas; Painter and Model, 2012, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, Jonathan Cape, and Victoria Miro.