Category Archives: ART

TABAIMO AND MAKI MORISHITA AT REDCAT

It’s the same for all my works: it’s not so much about controlling the viewer’s point of view as it is about setting up a space which will encourage viewers to be proactive in how they look at the work. — Tabaimo

FRUITS BORNE OUT OF RUST—a multimedia performance collaboration by the artist Tabaimo and dancer-choreographer Maki Morishita— using drawings, video installations, and live music to “probe the themes that lurk beneath daily existence”—begins its premiere engagement in the United States this week at Redcat.*

TABAIMO and MAKI MORISHITA—FRUITS BORNE OUT OF RUST*

Thursday through Saturday, February 20, 21, and 22.

Sunday, February 23, at 3 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Tabaimo and Maki Morishita, Fruits borne out of rust in performance. Top photograph by Bozzo. Images courtesy and © the artists and performers.

DORA MAAR

DORA MAAR—the comprehensive retrospective of the great surrealist photographer, photomontage artist, and painter—is now on view at Tate Modern.

DORA MAAR is curated by Karolina Ziebinska-Lewandowska and Damarice Amao (curator and assistant curator, Centre Pompidou, Paris), and Amanda Maddox (associate curator, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles), with Emma Lewis (assistant Curator, Tate Modern).

DORA MAAR

Through March 15.

Tate Modern

Millbank, London.

Dora Maar, from top: Model Star, 1936, silver gelatin print, Thérond Collection; Untitled, 1935, silver gelatin print, formerly in the Christian Bouqueret Collection, Centre Pompidou, Paris; Still Life with Jar and Cup, 1945, oil on canvas, private collection; The years lie in wait for you, circa 1935, William Talbott Hillman Collection; 29 rue d’Astorg, circa 1936; Untitled (Hand-Shell), 1934; The Conversation, 1937, Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte, Madrid © FABA, photograph by Marc Domage; Woman Sitting in Profile, circa 1930, (tattoo patterns drawn on photograph), private collection; The Simulator, 1936, silver gelatin print printed on a carton, Centre Pompidou, Paris; Portrait of Picasso, Paris, Studio 29, rue d’Astorg, Winter, 1935, silver gelatin negative on flexible support in cellulose nitrate, Centre Pompidou; Model in Swimsuit, 1936, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Portrait of Ubu,1936, silver gelatin print, Centre Pompidou; Man looking inside a sidewalk inspection door, London, circa 1935, collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg, New York, courtesy art2art circulating exhibitions. Images courtesy and © Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Centre de création industrielle, Paris, MNAM-CCI, A. Laurans, P. Migeat, RMN-GP, ADAGP, Paris, 2019, DACS, London, 2019, and the estate of Dora Maar.


BILLBOARD CREATIVE 2020

Our concept is to treat the city as an open-air gallery for the benefit of both the artists and Los Angeles. — Billboard Creative founder and executive director Adam Santelli

The sixth edition of BILLBOARD CREATIVE is on view around town through the end of February.

Billboard Creative 2020 participating artists include, from top: Cornelia Hediger (detail), Sharon Eldridge (installation view), Nicole Abbett, Ellen Jantzen, Kara Maria (installation view, Fairfax Avenue, just south of Santa Monica Boulevard), Jona Frank, Sara Silvia Ferrucci, Kathleen Whitaker (installation view), Marina Shaltout, Luciana Abait, Christy Lee Rogers, and Hediger (installation view, Lexington Avenue, just west oh Highland Avenue). Images courtesy and © the artists, their galleries, and Billboard Creative.

FELLINI’S ROMA RESTORED

After the election of 1960, my friend Howard Austen and I moved to Rome not far from the classical library of the American Academy, where I daily worked on a novel about Julian the Apostate. Also during our first Roman years, in the Via Giulia and later in the Largo Argentina, movie production was at its peak, and, for a few years, many movies were made at Cinecittà, the principal Roman studio. During the late 50s I had worked on the script of Ben-Hur in an office next to that of the producer Sam Zimbalist. Farther down the corridor from my office, Federico Fellini was preparing what would become La Dolce Vita. He was fascinated by our huge Hollywood production. Several times we had lunch together in the commissary. Soon he was calling me Gorino and I was calling him Fred…

Suddenly, one day in 1971, there was Fellini on the terrace of our Largo Argentina flat. “I make film about Roma. I want you and Alberto Sordi and Anna Magnani and Marcello Mastroianni.” I asked Why? This was Fred’s least favorite word. He was a droll and inventive liar and his verbal arabesques were for the most part entirely wasted on flat-footed showbiz interviewers. He blinked his eyes as if in thought: Why? We were in the restaurant of the Grand Hotel, where he would establish himself at a special table set in what looked to be an opera box. “Because,” he said, “you all live in Rome and you are all from outside.” I laughed. “Magnani is Rome.” He realized his mistake. He waved his hands. “She is from everywhere. Like the sun. The moon. The … I have one question I will ask each of you, who can live anywhere, Why you live in Roma?”…

My scene was shot in a small square off Via dei Coronari. It was a freezing February night, but we were all dressed in summer clothes, pretending it was the August Trastevere festival of Noantri. Tables and benches were scattered around the square. Huge plastic fish were on display in tubs. Howard and I sat at a table with three or four American friends. I was fascinated to find that Fellini worked much the way Picasso did in the documentary where he paints on a sheet of glass while the camera shoots from under the table so that we can see what he is painting as he erases, transforms, re-structures. Plates of food kept arriving. Wine bottles. More plastic fish. Some tourists sit at a table opposite us. Fred directed his cameraman as he kept filling in the background with people, food, decorations. When Fellini Roma was released, in 1972 (Fred’s name was part of the title), he was also ready by then to tell the world why he had picked his four stars. “I pick Mastroianni because he is so lazy, so typical. Alberto Sordi because he is so cruel.” An odd characterization: Sordi was a superb comic actor whom one did not associate with cruelty, but then, at the core of comedy, there is indeed a level of sharp observation that the ones observed might easily regard as cruel. “I chose Anna Magnani because she is Anna and this is Roma. Vidal because he is typical of a certain Anglo who comes to Roma and goes native.” As I never spoke Italian properly, much less Roman dialect, and my days were spent in a library researching the fourth century A.D., I was about as little “gone native” as it was possible to be, but Fred clung to his first images of people.Gore Vidal*

This weekend at the Egyptian, the American Cinematheque celebrates Fellini’s centenary with a screening of the 4K restoration of the director’s surrealist documentary ROMA, preceded by a program of clips and photographs presented by Cineteca di Bologna director Gian Luca Farinelli.

FELLINI’S ROMA

Sunday, February 16, at 7 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*Gore Vidal, Point to Point Navigation (New York: Random House, 2006).

Fellini’s Roma (1972) stills (6) and Italian poster. Black and white photograph: Gore Vidal (left) and Federico Fellini. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker’s estate, the participants, the photographers, the graphic designer, the producers, and Park Circus/MGM.

AVERY SINGER AND ARAM MOSHAYEDI

In conjunction with Hauser & Wirth’s presentation of the work of Avery Singer at Frieze Los Angeles, the artist will join Hammer Museum curator Aram Moshayedi for a conversation “[exploring] Singer’s distinctive use of digital tools, including 3D modeling software, her deft engagement with established traditions of archival documentation, and her groundbreaking techniques that she uses to question the ways in which images and their distribution are increasingly informed by new media and technologies.”*

AVERY SINGER IN CONVERSATION WITH ARAM MOSHAYEDI*

Saturday, February 15, at 4 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Avery Singer. Artwork images and artist photograph courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth.