Category Archives: BOOKS/PERIODICALS

SHARA HUGHES — DAY BY DAY BY DAY

What artworks never fail to make us feel is their author’s idea of us—how the artist considers the one watching the result, what he or she imagines this watcher is capable of… By using this common language that the painting and the spectator have in common—shapes—the ideas of Shara Hughes give dignity to the spectator. She trusts our capacity to understand this language: we fabricate these landscapes with her, these interiors, these flower bouquets, we are ready for this alternative reality that does not address our reason but our senses and knowledge. — Éric Troncy*

A selection of new works by Shara Hughes—drawings, monoprint drawings**, and paintings—is on view now in Zürich. A comprehensive catalogue depicting these “psychological or invented landscapes,” with an essay by Andrew Russeth, will accompany the exhibition.

SHARA HUGHES—DAY BY DAY BY DAY

Through September 19.

Galerie Eva Presenhuber

Rämistrasse 33, Zürich.

*Éric Troncy, “Shara Hughes,” in Shara Hughes: At Arm’s Length (Los Angeles: DoPe Press; Zürich: Galerie Eva Presenhuber, 2019), 51.

**The term monoprint drawing refers to a technique Hughes has developed, which consists of using the discarded sheets of former prints. In these prints, the artist removed most of the paint applied on the printing plate using a sheet of paper, thus creating a pale ghost of the motif made up of the diluted colors. This then served as the basis for the actual work, while the original, much more defined print constitutes the discarded remnants of the work. In her monoprint drawings, Hughes returns to these stark forms, which were initially used to create the ghost to serve as a subtle structure with colors that only can be produced in the printing process. Therefore, the monoprint drawings are neither a copy nor a different version of another print but rather a literal déjà-vu, a landscape one may have already seen before, or might be a mere effect of one’s imagination. — Galerie Eva Presenhuber

Shara Hughes, Day by Day by Day, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, June 2, 2020–September 19, 2020, from top: Full Moon Cove 2, 2020, printed ink and mixed media on paper; Shelter, 2020, mixed media on paper; Truth In Your Shadows 4, 2019, printed ink and mixed media on paper; The Slightest Mistake 3, 2019, printed ink and mixed media on paper; Trying To Seem Clean Cut 2, 2019, printed ink and mixed media on paper; Outsider 2, 2019, printed ink and mixed media on paper; Hopeful Self Portrait, 2020, mixed media on paper; Making It Work, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas; Sun Shower, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas; More Boundaries, 2020, mixed media on paper; Fiery Grounds, 2020, printed ink and mixed media on paper; Proud To Be Here, 2020, mixed media on paper. Images courtesy and © the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber.

MOYRA DAVEY AND MAGGIE NELSON IN CONVERSATION

On the occasion of the publication of Moyra Davey’s new book of essays INDEX CARDS, the Community Bookstore in Brooklyn presents a virtual conversation between Davey and Maggie Nelson.

MOYRA DAVEY PRESENTS INDEX CARDS, with MAGGIE NELSON

Wednesday, June 17.

4:30 on the West Coast; 7:30 East Coast.

From top: Moyra Davey, photograph by Gene Pittman; Moyra Davey, Index Cards, 2020, New Directions; Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts, 2015, Graywolf, illustration courtesy Barnard College; Maggie Nelson. Images courtesy and © the authors, Graywolf, and New Directions.

MIKE DAVIS AND JON WIENER — SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE

The nation’s first and most successful underground paper of the Sixties, the Los Angeles Free Press (the “Freep”) at its peak in 1970 published forty-eight pages every week, had a guaranteed paid circulation of 85,000, and boasted a “faithful readership” estimated at a quarter of a million. At the time, among alternative weeklies, only the Village Voice, started a decade earlier, had more readers. The Freep’s founder, Art Kunkin (1928–2019) was not a naïve hippie or flower child, but rather an experienced Old Left journalist. When he published the first issue in 1964, he was thirty-five and already a movement elder. A New Yorker who had gone to Bronx High School of Science, he had become a tool and die maker, and—by then a Marxist—joined the Trotskyite Socialist Workers Party (SWP), working at GM and Ford in the 1950s and becoming business manager of the SWP newspaper, the Militant. In the early 1960s he moved to L.A. and, he says, “went back to school to become a history professor.” A faculty member asked whether he wanted to work on a new Mexican-American newspaper, the East L.A. Almanac. It published eight pages, once a month, 5,000 copies, and was associated with MAPA, the new Mexican American Political Association, headed by Edward Roybal—the first Latino on the L.A. City Council, and later the first Latino member of Congress from California. “I was the political editor,” Kunkin said, “listed on the masthead as Arturo, and I’m writing about garbage collections in East Los Angeles.” By that time he had left the SWP, joined the less radical Socialist Party, and become its Southern California chairman: “I was working closely with Norman Thomas and with Erich Fromm, the famous psychologist,” he said. “I wrote some resolutions with Fromm against the Democratic Party drift of the Socialist Party.”

He started planning the Freep in January 1963, after a visit from the FBI. They had read his criticisms of LBJ in the East L.A. Almanac, and asked whether he was a Communist and whether he could identify names on a list of suspected Communists. He told them he was a socialist and an anti-communist, and that he refused to talk about other people. Two days later, after the FBI visited the East L.A. Almanac, he was fired. He had long been complaining to friends hanging out at the Sunset Strip coffee shop Xanadu about the Village Voice: while it excelled at covering the hip scene and ran some strong writing, politically it always supported liberal Democrats. People told Kunkin he couldn’t publish a Voice-type independent paper in L.A. because the city had no Greenwich Village; it was too spread out and fragmented, and besides, it would require at least $10,000 to get started. But Kunkin went ahead anyway, looking for financial backers…

The first stand-alone issue of the Freep was dated July 30, 1964. “A New Weekly,” it proclaimed in a front-page statement, “Why We Appear.” Kunkin opened by declaring that while the paper represented no party or group, “we class ourselves … among the liberals.” Of course, Kunkin himself was not a liberal; he had been a member of the SWP and at the time was a leader of the Socialist Party in L.A., which made it a point to criticize liberals. Apparently he thought that L.A. in 1964 was not ready for a paper that criticized liberals from the left. Kunkin did promise that the Freep would be “free enough to print material disagreeing with liberal organizations,” and indeed the paper would start doing that pretty quickly. But at the beginning, Kunkin declared his goal was “to link together the various sections of our far flung liberal community.” He also said “we do not plan to deal with national and international events”—instead, the paper would focus on Los Angeles. — from Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties*

Mike Davis and Jon Wiener—authors of the epic new movement history SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE: L.A. IN THE SIXTIES—will discuss the period covered in the book and its application to the ongoing crisis.

Presented by Verso and the London School of Economics, the authors will be joined by Glyn Robbins.

SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE: L.A. IN THE SIXTIES—

MIKE DAVIS, JON WIENER, and GLYN ROBBINS IN CONVERSATION

Monday, June 8.

10 am on the West Coast; 1 pm East Coast.

*Mike Davis and Jon Wiener, Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties (New York: Verso, 2020).

From top: Angela Davis (left, with Che-Lumumba Club Leader Kendra Alexander) enters Royce Hall at UCLA for her first lecture in October 1969—attended by 2,000 students; Art Kunkin, courtesy and © the New York Times; Los Angeles Free Press, first stand-alone issue (following sample insert premiere issue); Los Angeles Free Press, vol. 3, no. 27; Gidra, UCLA’s radical Asian-American zine, courtesy Mike Murase; members of the Gidra staff pose in a photograph to protest exploitation of Asian females, photograph by Mike Murase, courtesy and © the photographer; Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties, courtesy and © the authors and Verso, cover design by Matt Dorfman, cover photograph by Luis C. Garza, courtesy and © the photographer and the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, youth from Florence in South Central L.A. arrive at Belvedere Park in East L.A. for La Marcha por la Justicia, January 31, 1971; Dorothy Healey, leader of the Communist Party of America, 1949, courtesy and © the Dorothy Healey Collection, California State University, Long Beach; Corita Kent, a passion for the possible, 1969, serigraph, courtesy and © the Corita Art Center.

PAUL B. PRECIADO BOOK LAUNCH AND READINGS

I am not a man I am not a woman I am not heterosexual I am not homosexual I am not bisexual. I am a dissident of the sex-gender system. I am the multiplicity of the cosmos trapped in a binary political and epistemological system, shouting in front of you. I am a Uranian confined inside the limits of techno-scientific capitalism.Paul B. PreciadoAn Apartment on Uranus

The queer-studies philosopher, curator, and author Paul B. Preciado will launch his latest book AN APARTMENT ON URANUS: CHRONICLES OF THE CROSSING—published by Semiotext(e)—which explores his transition from Beatriz to Paul, the Greek economic crisis, the refugee crisis, and the Catalonian independence movement.

The streamed event—presented by Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin—will include readings by Preciado, Susanne Sachsse, Black Cracker, Margarita Tsomou.

PAUL B. PRECIADO—AN APARTMENT ON URANUS LAUNCH and CONVERSATION

Saturday, May 30.

Noon on the West Coast; 3 pm East Coast.

From top: Paul B. Preciado (2); An Apartment on Uranus, 2020, cover courtesy and © Semiotext(e); Black Cracker in Berlin, 2015, photograph by Ériver Hijano; Countersexual Manifesto, 2018, courtesy and © Columbia University Press. Images courtesy and © the author.

THE COMPLETE FILMS OF AGNÈS VARDA

A founder of the French New Wave who became an international art-house icon, Agnès Varda was a fiercely independent, restlessly curious visionary whose work was at once personal and passionately committed to the world around her. In an abundant career in which she never stopped expanding the notion of what a movie can be, Varda forged a unique cinematic vocabulary that frequently blurs the boundaries between narrative and documentary, and entwines loving portraits of her friends, her family, and her own inner world with a social consciousness that was closely attuned to the 1960s counterculture, the women’s liberation movement, the plight of the poor and socially marginalized, and the ecology of our planet. This comprehensive collection places Varda’s filmography in the context of her parallel work as a photographer and multimedia artist—all of it a testament to the radical vision, boundless imagination, and radiant spirit of a true original for whom every act of creation was a vital expression of her very being. — The Criterion Collection

The new box set THE COMPLETE FILMS OF AGNÈS VARDA features digital restorations of thirty-nine films as well as the television productions Agnès de ci de là Varda, Nausicaa (1970), Quelques veuves de Noirmoutier, and Varda’s segments from Une minute pour une image.

Also included: rare archival footage, tributes and interviews, segments from unfinished works, and a 200-page book with contributions by Amy Taubin, Michael Koresky, Ginette Vincendeau, So Mayer, Alexandra Hidalgo, and Rebecca Bengal, as well as a selection of Varda’s photography and images of her installation art.

The feature films are divided into fifteen programs:

Agnès Forever — Varda by Agnès (2019), Les 3 boutons (2015).

Early Varda — La Pointe Courte (1955), Ô saisons, ô châteaux (1958), Du côté de la côte (1958).

Around Paris — Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962), Les fiancés du pont Macdonald (1962), L’opéra-mouffe (1958), Les dites cariatides (1984), T’as de beaux escaliers, tu sais (1986).

Rue Daguerre — Daguerréotypes (1975), Le lion volatil (2003).

Married Life — Le bonheur (1965), Les créatures (1966), Elsa la Rose (1966).

In California — Uncle Yanco (1968), Black Panthers (1970), Lions Love (. . . and Lies) (1969), Mur Murs (1981), Documenteur (1981).

Her Body, Herself — One Sings, the Other Doesn’t (1977), Réponse de femmes (1975), Plaisir d’amour en Iran (1977).

No Shelter — Vagabond (1985), 7 p., cuis., s. de b. . . . (à saisir) (1985).

Jane B. — Jane B. par Agnès V. (1988), Kung-Fu Master! (1988).

Jacques Demy — Jacquot de Nantes (1991), The Young Girls Turn 25 (1993), The World of Jacques Demy (1995).

Simon Cinéma — One Hundred and One Nights (1995).

La glaneuse — The Gleaners and I (2000), The Gleaners and I: Two Years Later (2002).

Visual Artist — Visages Villages, codirected with JR (2017), Salut les cubains (1964), Ulysse (1982), Ydessa, les ours et etc. . . . (2004).

Here and There — Agnès de ci de là Varda (2011).

Beaches — The Beaches of Agnès (2008).

See link below for details.

THE COMPLETE FILMS OF AGNÈS VARDA

The Criterion Collection

Agnès Varda, from top: Varda in Visages, Villages; Du côté de la côte; Black Panthers; Nausicaa; Réponse de femmes poster; Salut les Cubains (2); Shirley Clarke, Gerome Ragni, and Viva in Lions Love (. . . and Lies); One Sings, the Other Doesn’t; The Complete Films of Agnès Varda, courtesy and © Criterion; Jane Birkin in Jane B. par Agnès V.; Daguerréotypes; Agnès de ci de là Varda. Images courtesy and © the estate of Agnès Varda and Ciné-Tamaris.