Category Archives: BOOKS/PERIODICALS

GRIEF AND GRIEVANCE CURATORIAL ROUNDTABLE

As images from the civil rights era migrated in the American visual lexicon, some becoming icons… a shift also happened in the aesthetic understanding of what images do and how they function. American society has been saturated with images since the post-Second World War period, and artists growing up at that time were some of the first to turn a critical eye to the production of images and cast doubt on their narrative function…

Black artists understood that though Black people may be the subject of many images throughout U.S. history, those captured by and circulated within those images gave little or no consent. In addition, the Black body and its visual reception have been so predetermined by stereotype that their presentation may undermine even good intentions. — Naomi Beckwith*

To kick off the New Museum exhibition GRIEF AND GRIEVANCE—ART AND MOURNING IN AMERICA—the final show conceived by Okwui Enwezor—join Beckwith, Glenn Ligon, Mark Nash, and New Museum artistic director Massimiliano Gioni for a curatorial roundtable.

See link below to register for this online event.

GRIEF AND GRIEVANCE CURATORIAL ROUNDTABLE

New Museum

Tuesday, February 16.

4 pm on the West Coast; 7 pm East Coast.

See MEETING WORLDS—ON OKWUI ENWEZOR’S WORK, an online conversation featuring Ute Meta Bauer (the founding director of the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore), Franklin Sirmans (the director of the Pérez Art Museum in Miami), Terry Smith (a professor of Contemporary Art History and Theory at the University of Pittsburgh), and Octavio Zaya, an independent art critic and curator. New Museum director Massimiliano Gioni moderated the January 21 talk.

*Naomi Beckwith, “My Soul Looks Back in Wonder,” in Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America (New York: New Museum; London: Phaidon, 2020), 182.

From top: Naomi Beckwith, photograph by Maria Ponce, courtesy of the photographer, Beckwith, and MCA Chicago; Glenn LigonA Small Band (2015) installation, New Museum, 2021, neon, paint, and metal support, image © Glenn Ligon, courtesy of the artist, Hauser & Wirth, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, Chantal Crousel, Paris, and the New Museum; Garrett Bradley, Alone (2017), still, single-channel 35mm film transferred to video, sound, black and white, image © Garrett Bradley, courtesy of the artist and the New Museum; Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America (2020), conceived by Okwui Enwezor, cover image courtesy and © New Museum and Phaidon; Mark Nash, image courtesy of Nash; Massimiliano Gioni, courtesy of Gioni and Alain Elkann.

FOR ELIJAH CUMMINGS

I’ve said many times, “We’re better than this…” I said it on the streets of my home, Baltimore, a city on the verge of explosion over police treatment of citizens. I said it in Congress when microphones were shut down, barring free speech… I will continue to say it. Because we must call out what is wrong, and call on our better selves to make things right. This is a fight for the future of our democracy. — Rep. Elijah Cummings

Join Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings—Elijah’s widow—and We’re Better Than This co-author James Dale for an online conversation on the life and work of the late Congressman.

This event is presented by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles. See link below for details.

DR. MAYA ROCKEYMOORE CUMMINGS and JAMES DALE IN CONVERSATION

ALOUD—Library Foundation of Los Angeles

Tuesday, February 9.

3 pm on the West Coast; 6 pm East Coast.

From top: Elijah Cummings (center) in 1988, courtesy and © Afro Newspaper /Gado / Getty Images; Elijah Cummings, We’re Better Than This, cover image courtesy and © HarperCollins; Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, courtesy of Dr. Cummings; Elijah Cummings (left).

ROBERT JONES JR. AND BRIT BENNETT

I had read tons of literary works and yet could find none where Black queer love was front and center, or present in the cultural or historical landscape prior to the Harlem Renaissance of the 20th century. Where I did find references, it was only in the context of sexual assault or some other form of depravity. And my question was: What about love?Robert Jones, Jr.

Join Robert Jones, Jr., and Brit Bennett in conversation as they discuss Jones’ debut novel The Prophets.

This Crowdcast event is hosted by Charis Books & More, outside Atlanta. See link below to register.

ROBERT JONES, JR., IN CONVERSATION WITH BRIT BENNETT

A Charis Virtual Event

Tuesday, January 12.

4:30 pm on the West Coast; 7:30 pm East Coast.

From top: Robert Jones Jr., photograph by Alberto Vargas, courtesy and © the author, the photographer, and G. P. Putnam’s Sons; Brit Bennett, photograph by Emma Trim, courtesy and © the author and the photographer; Jones, The Prophets, cover image courtesy and © G. P. Putnam’s Sons; Bennett, The Vanishing Half, cover image courtesy and © Riverhead Books.

RONI HORN’S ICELAND WRITINGS

You consume with your eyes. And eyes are voracious. The stomach has a size. It will only fit so much. But the eyes?…You think eventually you will get enough. But satisfaction and familiarity don’t come. You just keep wanting and waiting. Wanting and waiting, needing more. A meal that does not end. — Roni Horn

ISLAND ZOMBIE: ICELAND WRITINGS—a new collection of texts, essays, and poems by Horn, illustrated with more than fifty images—is out now from Princeton University Press.

Roni Horn, from top: Man at hot spring, Strúter, Iceland, 1990, from To Place: Pooling Waters IV, published by Walther König, Cologne, 1994, image © Roni Horn, collection of the artist; Roni Horn, Island Zombie: Iceland Writings (2020), cover image courtesy and © the artist and Princeton University Press; Rationalists Would Wear Sombreros, 1990, Ink and graphite on special-edition print, from To Place: Bluff Life, published by Peter Blum Edition, New York,1990, image © Roni Horn, collection of the artist.

LAZARUS STREAM

LAZARUS was one of the last things dad created before he died. I know he was incredibly excited about it: working with new people in a new medium. His favorite place to be. As tired as he was, he was clearly loving it! The original London production will be streaming in January. — Duncan Jones

David Bowie and Enda Walsh’s LAZARUS—directed by Ivo van Hove—will stream this month for three days only, marking Bowie’s birthday and the fifth anniversary of his death. See link below to find your location, date, and time.

LAZARUS

Music and lyrics by David Bowie, book by Enda Walsh.

Based on the novel The Man Who Fell To Earth by Walter Tevis.

DICE

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, January 8, 9, and 10.

David Bowie and Enda Walsh, Lazarus (2015), from top: Michael C. Hall; Lazarus poster; Hall and Sophia Anne Caruso; Hall. Images courtesy and © Robert Fox Ltd. and Jones/Tintoretto Entertainment.