Category Archives: BOOKS/PERIODICALS

KIM GORDON — SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND

Inhabiting the four rooms of the IMMA’s Courtyard Galleries, Kim Gordon’s exhibition SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND presents new and unseen work—including paintings, drawings, sculptures from the Noise Painting, From the Boyfriend, and Airbnb series—and an immersive video projection.

KIM GORDON—SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND

Through November 10.

Irish Museum of Modern Art

Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin.

See “No Retirement Plan: Kim Gordon and Carrie Brownstein in Conversation with Dorothée Perret.” PARIS LA 15 (2017).

Kim Gordon, from top: Proposal For a Dance, 2008–2010, DVD still, 12 minutes; Dead Machines, 2018, acrylic on canvas; Lay Down Thy Limbs 2, 2019, acrylic and medium on canvas; Black Glitter Circle, 2008, glitter; Mood, 2018, acrylic on canvas; Untitled (from the boyfriend series), 2015, acrylic, medium, and interference powder on denim skirt; Proposal For a Dance, 2008–2010, still. Images courtesy and © the artist and 303 Gallery, New York.

HARALD SZEEMANN — SELECTED WRITINGS

Harald Szeemann (1933–2005)—curator, artist, art historian, and “secretary general” of the legendary documenta 5—was an exhibition maker nonpareil. HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS—published in conjunction with last year’s exhibition Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions at the Getty Research Institute (home of the Harald Szeemann Papers)—brings together over seventy essays and interviews, many published in English for the first time.

Richly illustrated throughout, the book contains a 20-page section of plates, including Szeemann’s artwork, exhibition diagrams, installation views, archival photographs, and other ephemera.

“I’m an existentialist. You are thrown in the universe from somewhere and are, once here, responsible for your acts. But it’s always a privilege to fall into a well-made bed. In this case, the Kunsthalle Bern in 1961…

“The historical moment, when the image of the creator/curator became conscious and evident, happened in 1969, when I organized When Attitudes Become Form and the artists arrived and installed their works and the TV reports publicized it. Beuys put his grease on the walls, Heizer made a hole in the public sidewalk, Artschwager distributed his blps in the city, Barry put the building under radiation, Weiner removed a square meter of wall, Ruthenbeck ruined the wooden floor with his wet ashes, Serra threw melted lead against the wall, etc., etc. This was no longer perceived as an art exhibition but as an archaic provocation—not by the artists, but by the curator who allowed it.” — Harald Szeemann*

HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS. Edited by Doris Chon, Glenn Phillips, and Pietro Rigolo. Translated by Jonathan Blower and Elizabeth Tucker. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2018.

In New York, the Swiss Institute has restaged GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE USthe 1974 exhibition Szeemann organized in his Bern apartment two years after documenta 5.

HARALD SZEEMANN—GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE US

Through August 18.

Swiss Institute

38 St. Marks Place, New York City.

*”Making Things Possible: A Conversation with Harald Szeemann.” Interview by Beti Žerovc. In Harald Szeemann—Selected Writings, 383–393.

From top, left to right: Harald Szeemann, in the 1990s in the Fabbrica Rosa, his office and archive in Maggia, Switzerland, photograph Fredo Meyer-Henn, State Archive of Canton Bern; Szeemann’s address list for his 1968 research trip to New York—for the Kunsthalle Bern exhibition Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form (1969)—includes contact info for Eva Hesse, Hans Haacke, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, and Lucas Samaras; Szeemann (seated) on the last night of documenta 5, 1972, photograph by Balthasar Burkhard; Getty Publications book cover; Lidija Delić, poster art commissioned by the Swiss Institute for the Grandfather: A Pioneer Like Us exhibition; Oasis No. 7, Haus-Rucker-Co (Laurids Ortner, Manfred Ortner, Klaus Pinter, Günter Zamp Kelp), 1972, documenta 5: Questioning Reality—Image Worlds Today, Kassel, 1972; part of Szeemann’s rubber stamp collection; Szeemann. Images courtesy the Harald Szeeman Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © J. Paul Getty Trust.

BETONY VERNON —THE BOUDOIR BIBLE

THE BOUDOIR BIBLEBetony Vernon’s sex-positive pillow book—was first published in 2013. A third printing—updated for the digital age, with new illustrations by François Berthoud—is out now from Rizzoli.

Betony—a sexual anthropologist and erotic jewelry designer—wrote THE BOUDOIR BIBLE to “provide basic body understanding that we all should have learned at school but didn’t. It fills those niches missing from other sex guides, including full, elaborated chapters on rope bondage, restraint of sound and sight, erotic flagellation and the stimulation of new erogenous zones among innumerable other offerings.”

BETONY VERNON, THE BOUDOIR BIBLE: THE UNINHIBITED SEX GUIDE FOR TODAY, illustrated by FRANÇOIS BERTHOUD (Rizzoli International Publications, third printing, 2019).

Betony Vernon, The Boudoir Bible, from top: illustrations by François Berthoud (3); photograph of Vernon by Ali Mahdavi; Rizzoli book cover; illustrations by Berthoud (2). Images courtesy and © the author, the illustrator, the photographer, and Rizzoli International Publications.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT

The Death of Michael Stewart—a 1983 painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat commonly known as Defacement—was Basquiat’s response to the killing of tagger Michael Stewart at the hands of New York City transit cops.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY—at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—explores of the impact of Stewart’s death on the lower Manhattan art community.

The exhibition—organized by Chaédria LaBouvier—includes work by David Hammons, Keith Haring, Lyle Ashton Harris, George Condo, and Andy Warhol. A film series will play in conjunction with the show (see link below for details).

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY

Through November 6.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top:  Jean-Michel Basquiat, Defacement (The Death of Michael Stewart), 1983, acrylic and marker on wood, collection of Nina Clemente, New York, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018; David HammonsThe Man Nobody Killed, 1986, stenciled paint on commercially printed cardboard with cut-and-taped photocopy from a spiral bound periodical with works by various artists, from Eye magazine, no. 14, “Cobalt Myth Mechanics,” 1986, © the Museum of Modern Art, New York, licensed by SCALA / ARS, New York; Keith HaringMichael Stewart, USA for Africa, 1985, enamel and acrylic on canvas, collection of Monique and Ziad Ghandour, © the Keith Haring Foundation; card for benefit at Danceteria, October 3, 1983, collection of Franck Goldberg, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; Jean-Michel BasquiatLa Hara, 1981, acrylic and oil stick on wood panel, Arora CollectionJean-Michel Basquiat, Charles the First, 1982, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, three panels; Lyle Ashton Harris, Saint Michael Stewart, 1994, photograph, courtesy and © Lyle Ashton Harris; Jean-Michel BasquiatUntitled (Sheriff), 1981, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, Carl Hirschmann Collection. Basquiat images courtesy and © the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / Artestar, the collectors, and the photographers.

OLIVER PAYNE AND MARTINE SYMS AT OOGA BOOGA

For two of its last public events before closing shop for good, OOGA BOOGA welcomes Oliver Payne and Martine Syms for in-store appearances, conversation, readings, music, and a trunk show.

OLIVER PAYNE and SAFE CRACKERS

Saturday, July 20, from 4 pm to 6 pm.

MARTINE SYMS and DOMINICA PUBLISHING

Sunday, July 21, from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Ooga Booga

943 North Broadway, suite 203, Chinatown, Los Angeles.

From top: T-shirt designed by Oliver Payne; Borrowed Lady—Martine Syms, the third in Simon Fraser University Gallery’s Critical Reader Series from Syms’ exhibition, on view at the Audain Gallery from October 13 to December 10, 2016; Ooga Booga (2); exterior view of Borrowed Time—Martine Syms, Audain Gallery, SFU, Burnaby, British Columbia. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, Ooga Booga, and Simon Fraser University.