Category Archives: CONVERSATION

HARMONY KORINE IN CONVERSATION

“I am always thinking about the cinema experience. That’s why I haven’t made television yet. Television is a writer’s medium. Not to say there aren’t good things in it, but television—no matter how good it is—is underwhelming. The size of it, and sitting in your living room. It’s pedestrian, whereas cinema is magic, it’s huge, it envelops you, and there’s something completely sensory when it works.” — Harmony Korine

On the eve of the release of The Beach Bum—his sixth feature—join Korine in Hollywood this week for two nights of double features and between-film conversations.

This American Cinematheque presentation of Korine’s films from the last twenty years includes his masterpiece Spring Breakers. All films will be screened in 35mm.

GUMMO and JULIEN DONKEY-BOY

Tuesday, March 19, at 7:30 pm.

TRASH HUMPERS and SPRING BREAKERS

Wednesday, March 20, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Rachel Korine in Spring Breakers; Bunny Boy in Gummo; Ewen Bremner in Julien Donkey-Boy; Trash Humpers. Images courtesy the artist, A24, Warner Bros., and Drag City.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND IN CONVERSATION

“In order to move on from the limitations of endless subjectivity, critical postmodern art reduced complex phenomena to a study of cultural form’s and language. Everything became political. With this analysis as a starting point I’m taking a more integral or inclusive stance. I’m not only interested in how images are being read but also in their magic and how they make us feel, how they move us. Even though photography often starts as observation, my dream is a more immersive engagement. I’m an observer longing for intimacy.” — Torbjørn Rødland*

On the opening day of his exhibition FIFTH HONEYMOON in Sweden, join Rødland at Bonniers Konsthall for a conversation with its director Magnus af Petersens.

The show includes the presentation of the artist’s film Between Fork and Ladder.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND and MAGNUS AF PETERSENS IN CONVERSATION

Wednesday, March 13, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND—FIFTH HONEYMOON

March 13 through June 2.

Bonniers Konsthall

Torsgatan 19, Stockholm.

*Rødland to Magnus af Petersens.

From top: Torbjørn Rødland, Anchor, 2017; Torbjørn Rødland, Baby, 2017; Torbjørn Rødland, The Man in the Moon is a Miss, 2016–2018. Images courtesy the artist and the David Kordansky Gallery.

LUCY LIPPARD — TACITA DEAN — EDWARD RANNEY

“I was always pro-artist because I was well aware that what I knew about art I learned from artists—not from criticism… [Robert Smithson] went to Max’s Kansas City every other night, and he’d bring a question to be discussed; he’d come ready to talk. I was there rarely, but I love to argue, so I’d argue with him… I liked him, but I always said he was a more important writer than he was an artist, and that pissed him off—for good reason, I guess.” — Lucy Lippard*

Following a Getty Center screening of Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty and Charles and Ray Eames’s Powers of Ten—in conjunction with an exhibition on monumentalityTacita Dean, Edward Ranney, and writer-activist Lucy Lippard will talk about their engagement with land art.

“I’ve always liked what feels like the impossibility of writing about images, and I always welcome the chance to mess around with form in ways that try to address that… Writing parallel to art, or collaborating with it, is what I’ve been trying to do, and it’s certainly more fun than just acting alone.” — Lippard*

(Lippard and Ranney collaborated on the books Down Country and The Lines.)

MONUMENTALITY AND COSMIC SCALE

LUCY LIPPARD, TACITA DEAN, and EDWARD RANNEY

Saturday, March 9, at 2 pm.

Getty Center

Harold M. Williams Auditorium

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Lucy Lippard,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 288, 289, 302–303.

From top: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Lucy Lippard, from the series Art World, 1982, gelatin silver print, © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Studio International, July/August 1970; Tacita Dean, JG (offset) (detail), 2013, set of fourteen handmade offset prints, the Getty Research Institute, courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, Frith Street Gallery, London, and Niels Borch Jensen Edition, Berlin and Copenhagen, © Tacita Dean; Edward Ranney, Ollantaytambo, Peru, 1975, © Edward Ranney, courtesy of the artist.

EL ANATSUI

For the opening night of TRIUMPHANT SCALE, his exhibition at Haus der Kunst in Munich, El Anatsui will give an artist talk at the museum.

The show has been organized by Okwui Enwezor—former Haus der Kunst artistic director—and Chika Okeke-Agulu, with assistance from Damian Lentini.

ARTIST TALK WITH EL ANATSUI

Friday, March 8, at 7 pm.

EL ANATSUI—TRIUMPHANT SCALE

March 3 through July 28.

Haus der Kunst

Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

From top: El Anatsui, Flag for a New World Power, 2004, aluminum and copper wire; El Anatsui, courtesy the artist; El Anatsui, Gravity and Grace, 2010, aluminum and copper wire. Images courtesy the artist and Haus der Kunst.

HARRY DODGE — WORKS OF LOVE

At Tufts, outside Boston, the exhibition HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE brings together sculptures, drawings, and videos that “revel as much in theoretical ideas about a post-human future as they do in the ecstasy of the workaday present.”*

This week join Dodge and Amy Sillman in a public conversation for the annual Beckwith Lecture at the Museum of Fine Arts.

HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE*

Though April 14.

Tufts University Art Gallery

Aidekman Arts Center

40 Talbot Avenue, Medford.

HARRY DODGE and AMY SILLMAN

Wednesday, March 6, at 7 pm.

Museum of Fine Arts

Remis Auditorium

465 Huntington Avenue, Boston.

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HARRY DODGE—WORKS OF LOVE is an expanded version of Dodge’s 2018 show at Joan, Los Angeles.

From top: Harry Dodge, Emergency Weapon #26Harry Dodge, Emergency Weapon #21Harry Dodge, Works of Love installation view, Joan, Los Angeles, 2018. Photograph by Paul Salveson. Images courtesy the artist.