Category Archives: DANCE

ANNE TERESA DE KEERSMAEKER IN PERFORMANCE AND CONVERSATION

On the opening day of her dance installation at Kunstsammlung NRW, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker will participate in an artist talk with Kunstahalle Basel director and curator Elena Filipovic, who edited De Keersmaeker’s exhibition catalog Work / Travail / Arbeid.

The installation—curated by Isabelle Malz—is a reconception of De Keersmaeker’s 1982 work FASE, FOUR MOVEMENTS TO THE MUSIC OF STEVE REICH. The piece will also be performed once in a stage version at Tanzhaus NRW.

The dancers—in alternating pairs—are Laura Bachman and Soa Ratsifandrihana, and Yuika Hashimoto and Laura Maria Poletti.

Following the presentation in Düsseldorf, De Keersmaeker will return to New York City where she is choreographing Ivo van Hove’s new Broadway production of Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim’s West Side Story. Previews begin on December 10, with opening night set for February 6, 2020.

ANNE TERESA DE KEERSMAEKER / ROSAS—FASE, FOUR MOVEMENTS TO THE MUSIC OF STEVE REICH installation

October 29–November 10, 2019.

Starting every hour from noon.

ANNE TERESA DE KEERSMAEKER IN CONVERSATION with ELENA FILIPOVIC

Tuesday, October 29, at 6 pm.

Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen K20

Grabbeplatz 5, Düsseldorf.

ANNE TERESA DE KEERSMAEKER / ROSAS—FASE, FOUR MOVEMENTS TO THE MUSIC OF STEVE REICH stage adaptation

Saturday, November 9, at 8 pm.

Tanzhaus Nordrhein-Westfalen

Erkrather Strasse 30, Düsseldorf.

From top: Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker; De Keersmaeker (left) and Michèle Anne De Mey performing Fase, Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich in 1999, photograph by Stephanie Berger (second from top and below); De Keersmaeker, Fase, 2018, Soa Ratsifandrihana (left) and Laura Bachman (2); Laura Maria Poletti; Ratsifandrihana and Bachman; Yuika Hashimoto and Poletti; Hashimoto; photographs by Anne Van Aerschot. Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker—Work / Travail / Arbeid, edited by Elena Filipovic, image courtesy and © Wiels (above). Dance images courtesy and © the choreographer, the dancers, and the photographers.

BALANCHINE’S JEWELS AT THE MUSIC CENTER

JEWELS (1967) is the three-part dance George Balanchine made in tribute to his early years at the Mariinsky Theater’s ballet school, where he learned techniques in mime and character and absorbed the school’s academic style. JEWELSEmeralds, Rubies, and Diamonds—is also, according to Arlene Croce, “unsurpassed as a Balanchine primer, incorporating in a single evening every important article of faith to which this choreographer subscribed and a burst of heresy, too, to remind us that he willingly reversed himself on occasion.”*

The heresy was the creation—on Edward Villella, for Rubies—of a major role for a male dancer equal to his female partners. Balanchine was famously preoccupied with his ballerinas, and his danseurs were there as support—in his words, “very important as princes and attendants to the queen, but woman is the queen.”* So Rubies—set to music by Igor Stravinsky—is the anomaly, falling between the choreographer’s great showcases for his primas: Emeralds (music by Gabriel Fauré) and Diamonds (Tchaikovsky).

As the opening engagement of the 2019–2020 season of Glorya Kaufman Presents Dance at The Music Center, the Mariinsky Ballet—accompanied by the Mariinsky Orchestra—will dance five performances of Balanchine’s JEWELS, which is titled for its gem-encrusted costumes as well as the necklace strands and diamond shapes of its choreography, an aspect best seen from the upper balcony. See link below for casting.

MARIINSKY BALLET—GEORGE BALANCHINE’S JEWELS

Thursday through Saturday, October 24, 25, and 26, at 7:30 pm.

Saturday and Sunday, October 26 and 27, at 2 pm.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

135 North Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

*Arlene Croce, “A Balanchine Triptych,” in Writing in the Dark, Dancing in The New Yorker (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2000), 449–456.

George Balanchine, Jewels, performed by the Mariinsky Ballet. Photographs, except above, by Natasha Razina. Above photograph by Svetlana Avvakum. Images courtesy and © the photographers, the dancers, and State Academic Mariinsky Theatre.

PATRICK COWLEY

Join Dirty Looks and Dark Entries Records to celebrate the life of dance-music pioneer Patrick Cowley (1950–1982) on what would have been his 69th birthday.

Nikki Darling, Divinity P. Fudge, Paul Gellman, Aimee Goguen, Sarah Johnson, Mr. Drummer ’79, Mz Neon, Brontez Purnell, Beau Rice, and Sheree Rose will read from MECHANICAL FANTASY BOX—THE HOMOEROTIC JOURNAL OF PATRICK COWLEY—accompanied by music from Cowley’s gay porn soundtracks and screenings of the original videos. The evening will also feature the premiere of a double album of Cowley’s unreleased recordings.

MENERGY—A NIGHT OF PATRICK COWLEY

Saturday, October 19, from 8 pm until midnight.

Civic Center Studios

207 South Broadway, suite 1, downtown Los Angeles.

Patrick Cowley, Mechanical Fantasy Box images courtesy and © Dark Entries Records; Muscle Up, 1984, film still; Menergy image courtesy and © Dirty Looks.

THE DAY AT ROYCE HALL

THE DAY—a performative investigation of the diurnal rhythms of life and what comes after—is a superlative collaboration between avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser (who conceived the work), dancer Wendy Whelan, composer David Lang, and legendary choreographer Lucinda Childs.

When [Childs started] choreographing dances, in 1968, it was with the predilection for keeping the movement vocabulary relatively simple, seeking complexity elsewhere—in the intricate design of spatial forms and in timing. But in the music-based works choreographed since 1979, which propose a much more complex movement vocabulary, Childs has broken radically with the anti-ballet aesthetic of the other ex- or neo-Duchampian choreographers with whom she has been grouped.

Of all the adepts of the rigorously modern among contemporary choreographers, she has the subtlest and most fastidious relation to classical dance… Childs does not feed balletic movements and positions into an eclectic mix but wholly transforms and reinterprets them. In this, as in other matters, she is adamantly anti-collage.Susan Sontag*

THE DAY was commissioned by Théâtre de la Ville in Paris, Carolina Performing Arts at the University of North Carolina, Jacob’s Pillow, the Joyce Theater, and CAP UCLA, and will be performed by Beiser and Whelan twice this weekend at Royce Hall.

THE DAY

Friday and Saturday, October 18 and 19, at 8 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

*Susan Sontag, “A Lexicon for Available Light,” Art in America, December 1983. Collected in Where the Stress Falls (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2001). Reprinted in Susan Sontag: Later Essays (New York: Library of America, 2017), 364–379.

The Day, Maya Beiser, Wendy Whelan, David Lang, Lucinda Childs: Beiser and Whelan in performance, photographs by Nils Schlebusch. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographer, and CAP UCLA.

WILLIAM FORSYTHE — A QUIET EVENING OF DANCE

William Forsythe presents A QUIET EVENING OF DANCE, two weeks of performances at The Shed mixing old and new works, set to the sound of the dancers breathing.

The program includes DIALOGUE (DUO2015) and CATALOGUE (SECOND EDITION) and, as a closer, the new SEVENTEEN/TWENTY ONE.

SEVENTEEN/TWENTY ONE is… a work whose brilliance Mr. Forsythe has deliberately primed us to see through the quiet rigors of the preceding works.” — Judith Mackrell

A QUIET EVENING OF DANCE will be performed by Brigel Gjoka, Jill Johnson, Christopher Roman, Parvaneh Scharafali, Riley Watts, Rauf Yasit, and Ander Zabala.

WILLIAM FORSYTHE—A QUIET EVENING OF DANCE

October 11 through 25.

Tuesday through Saturday at 7:30 pm. Sundays at 3 pm.

No performance on Thursday, October 17.

Griffin Theater, The Shed

545 West 30th Street, New York City.

William Forsythe, A Quiet Evening of Dance, from top: Ander Zabala and Parvaneh Scharafali; Rauf Yasit (foreground) and Christopher Roman (2); Jill Johnson and Roman (2); Riley Watts (right), Zabala, and Brigel Gjoka(red pants); Yasit and Scharafali; Johnson and Roman. Images courtesy and © the choreographer, the dancers, and the videographer.