Category Archives: DESIGN

THE SWISS GRID

Order was always wishful thinking for me. For sixty years I have produced disorder in files, correspondence, and books. In my work, however, I have always aspired to a distinct arrangement of typographic and pictorial elements, the clear identification of priorities. The formal organization of the surface by means of the grid, a knowledge of the rules that govern legibility—line length, word and letter spacing, and so on—and the meaningful use of color are among the tools a designer must master in order to complete his or her task in a rational and economic matter. — Josef Müller-Brockmann

THE SWISS GRID—an exhibition that “explores the development and impact of the International Typographic Style”—is now in its final weeks at Poster House.*

See link below for details.

THE SWISS GRID

Through February 14.

Poster House

119 West 23rd Street, New York City.

The Swiss Grid, Poster House, New York, February 27, 2020–February 14, 2021, from top: Josef Müller-Brockmann, Musica Viva, 1958, Tonhalle-Gesellschaft, Zürich; Armin Hofmann, Junge Holländische Bildhauer, 1960, Kunsthalle Basel; Robert Büchler, Typographie, 1962, Gewerbemuseum Basel, unmodified and modified; Richard Paul Lohse, Ausstellung Musikinstrumente, 1962, Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zürich; Armin Hofmann, Stadt Theater Basel, circa 1963–1967; Emil Ruder, Berlin, 1963, Gewerbemuseum Basel; Armin Hofmann, Giselle, 1959, Basler Freilichtspiele. Images courtesy and © the artists, their estates, and Poster House.

ON ANNI AND JOSEF ALBERS

This week, Nicholas Fox Weber—executive director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation—will join David Zwirner gallery’s David Leiber for a conversation about Fox Weber’s new book ANNI & JOSEF ALBERS: EQUAL AND UNEQUAL.

The online discussion will be moderated by Lauren Hinkson, associate curator at the Guggenheim. See link below to register.

ON ANNI and JOSEF ALBERS—EQUAL AND UNEQUAL

Phaidon and David Zwirner

Wednesday, November 18.

10 am on the West Coast; 1 pm East Coast; 6 pm London; 7 pm Paris.

Top: Josef Albers, photographs of Hawaii (Anni Albers and Josef Albers), 1954. Image © 2020 the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / ARS, New York / DACS.

Above: Nicholas Fox Weber, Anni & Josef Albers: Equal and Unequal (2020). Images (8) courtesy and © the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and Phaidon.

Below: Josef Albers and Anni Albers. Image © 2020 the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / ARS, New York / DACS.

EMMA WOLF-HAUGH — DOMESTIC OPTIMISM

DOMESTIC OPTIMISM—a show by Emma Wolf-Haugh—opens this month in Austria.

An exhibition about mangled and mistold modernist legacies, the project begins with furniture, inanimate objects that come loaded with social connections and invisible histories. Through the displacement of cultural detritus Wolf-Haugh retells modernist architectural history in the collective key of queer-feminist and decolonial practices, continually unearthing filth in times of hygiene, and complicating things that were never simple to begin with.*

EMMA WOLF-HAUGH—DOMESTIC OPTIMISM

ACT ONE—MODERNISM: A LESBIAN LOVE STORY*

Opening: Thursday, September 24, 3 pm to 7 pm.

Exhibition on view through November 20.

Grazer Kunstverein

Palais Trauttmansdorff

Burggasse 4, Graz.

Emma Wolf-Haugh, Domestic Optimism, Act One—Modernism: A Lesbian Love Story, Grazer Kunstverein, September 24, 2020–November 20, 2020. Images courtesy and © the artist.

HANNE DARBOVEN AND RUTH WOLF-REHFELDT

SIGN OF THE TIMES / TIMES OF THE SIGN—an exhibition curated by Julia Schleicher, tracing the parallel working lives of Hanne Darboven and Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt—is on view in London.

Hanne Darboven submitted her works to a clear, artist-defined structure that allowed her to generate a visual form for the contingencies and relationships that emerged from the numerical process. Darboven’s method strikes a contrast to Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt, who composed her work using patterns and combinations of typewriter characters. Despite their differences, both artists shared an interest in the productive potential of external structures.*

HANNE DARBOVEN and RUTH WOLF-REHFELDT—SIGN OF THE TIMES / TIMES OF THE SIGN*

Through September 19, by appointment.

Sprüth Magers

7A Grafton Street, Mayfair, London.

From top: Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt, Divided Planet, circa mid-1970s, carbon copy of original typewriting; Hanne Darboven, Untitled (Early Construction Drawings New York), 1966 / 1967, pencil and ballpoint on graph paper; Hanne Darboven, Dostojewski, Monat Januar, 1990, ink and silver gelatin silver print on paper; Darboven, photograph by Angelika Platen; Wolf-Rehfeldt, portrait, circa 1960, courtesy and © Robert Rehfeldt and Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt; Hanne Darboven, Untitled (Early Construction Drawings New York), 1966 / 1967, pencil on paper; Hanne Darboven, Ost-West-Demokratie, 1983, felt-tip pen on postcards, textile flags of the Soviet Union, United States, GDR, and BRD. Images courtesy and © Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt, the Hanne Darboven Foundation, and Sprüth Magers.

ELECTRONIC — FROM KRAFTWERK TO THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS

Evoking the experience of being in a club, the exhibition ELECTRONIC—FROM KRAFTWERK TO THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS will transport you through the people, art, design, technology, and photography that have been shaping the electronic music landscape.*

See link below for details.

ELECTRONIC—FROM KRAFTWERK TO THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS

Through February 14, by appointment.

Design Museum

224–238 Kensington High Street, Kensington, London.

Electronic: From Kraftwerk to the Chemical Brothers, Design Museum, London, July 31, 2020–February 14, 2021, from top: Adam Smith and Marcus Lyall’s sensory experience for the Chemical Brothers’ track “Got to Keep On,” photograph by Guy Bell / Rex / Shutterstock; Kraftwerk, photograph by Guy Bell / Rex / Shutterstock; installation view, photograph by Felix Speller; Yuri Suzuki and Jeff Mills, The Visitor; masks from the Aphex Twin video Windowlicker (1999), photograph by Speller; Smith and Nyall’s “Got to Keep On” installation; Haçienda club designs by Ben Kelly and Peter Saville; Electronic: From Kraftwerk to the Chemical Brothers exhibition catalog; Jean-Michel Jarre’s imaginary studio, photograph by Speller; Weirdcore, Aphex Twin’s Collapse; 1024 Architecture, Core; Bruno Peinado, Untitled (The Endless Summer), 2007, photograph by Speller. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, and the Design Museum.