Category Archives: EDUCATION/ACTIVISM

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.

RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE

DISRUPTION TACTICS: RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE—a panel discussion moderated by Gregg Bordowitz—”will bring together artists, activists, and writers to explore legacies of radical queer publishing and print culture from the 1970s to today.”

Celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of Stonewall and the new edition of THE FAGGOTS AND THEIR FRIENDS BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS—written by Larry Mitchell and illustrated by Ned Asta—the event “will feature readings of historic manifestos and texts.”

DISRUPTION TACTICS—RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE

Tuesday, June 18, at 7 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

Larry Mitchell, The Faggots and Their Friends Between Revolutions (Brooklyn: Nightboat Books, 2019). Design and illustrations by Ned Asta, courtesy and © the artist and Nightboat Books.

NINA MENKES

“QUEEN OF DIAMONDS is my very personal portrait of the United States: an over-enlarged, profit-motivated core surrounded by mute and arid alienation. The female protagonist is both deeply estranged and psychically powerful. Her loner position is the backside of centuries of Western Heroes: she stands in the center as watcher and victim of a system which is starting to crack.” — Nina Menkes

The UCLA Film and Television program Nina Menkes, Cinematic Sorceress features a double-bill of two of Menkes’ key works—both starring her sister Tinka Menkes—including the 4K restoration of QUEEN OF DIAMONDS (1991). The filmmaker will be on hand to discuss her work.

QUEEN OF DIAMONDS shares not only the formal sophistication and structural rigor of Barbara Loden’s Wanda (1970) and Chantal Akerman’s Jeanne Dielman (1975) but also their themes: female alienation and the ways that passivity, muteness, and a refusal to engage can serve as forms of resistance to patriarchal oppression. Ironically, these same themes helped to eclipse the three works—and many others like them—for too long.” — Sarah Resnick

QUEEN OF DIAMONDS and THE BLOODY CHILD

Saturday, June 15, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

See Bérénice Reynaud on Menkes.

From top: Tinka Menkes in Queen of Diamonds (5); Tinka Menkes in The Bloody Child (2). Images courtesy and © Nina Menkes and Arbelos Films.

PAINT, ALSO KNOWN AS BLOOD

PAINT, ALSO KNOWN AS BLOOD—WOMEN, AFFECT, AND DESIRE IN CONTEMPORARY PAINTING is a large-scale exhibition “devoted to women whose painting practice re-evaluates stereotypes concerning submission and domination”*

The show—featuring work from Poland and abroad— “takes on the challenge of representing the intensity of the external and internal worlds…

“In the beginning of the 1990s, third-wave feminism introduced a new, sometimes self-mocking and ironic, unconstrained and exhibitionist tone in the debate on the images of women in culture, their social roles and desires, the physiology of their bodies, and identity. The exhibition demonstrates that—despite the advancing digitization and dematerialization occurring in social media—firmly embedded in the body, its pleasures, and traumas, painting remains an exceptionally evocative medium for representing human experience.”

“In the context of current social transformations, the postulates of equal access to reproductive and sexual rights, and the race and class struggles, women’s painting provides an important contemplation on the violence inscribed in the orders of seeing and consuming images—how we look at them, what we see, and how others see us. And yet, this is not the kind of painting that seeks to forcibly instruct, provide current affairs commentary, or to admonish. Rather, it calls for alternative scenarios and, most of all, the freedom of expression and the presence of multiple, intersecting identities…”*

PAINT, ALSO KNOWN AS BLOOD—WOMEN, AFFECT, AND DESIRE IN CONTEMPORARY PAINTING*

Through August 11.

Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw

Wybrzeże Kościuszkowskie 22, Warsaw.

Artists in the exhibition include Lena Achtelik, Darja Bajagic, Gosia Bartosik, Kamilla Bischof, Agata Bogacka, Martyna Borowiecka, Agnieszka Brzeżańska, Chelsea Culprit, Martyna Czech, Olga Dmowska, Angela Dufresne, Isabelle Fein, Viola Głowacka, Penny Goring, Jenna Gribbon, Hyon Gyon, Karolina Jabłońska, Katarina Janeckova, Cheyenne Julien, Ewa JuszkiewiczCelina Kanunnikava, Irini Karayannopoulou, Allison Katz, Simone Kennedy Doig, Caitlin Keogh, Stanislava Kovalcikova, Dominika Kowynia, Sarah Ksieska, Katarzyna Kukuła, Agata Kus, Sasa Lubinska, Reba Maybury, Monika Misztal, Magdalena Moskwa, Marta Nadolle, Paulina Ołowska, Julia Poziomecka, Christina Quarles, Autumn Ramsey, Megan Rooney, Dana Schutz, Tschabalala Self, Agata Słowak, Paulina Stasik, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Alex Urban, Aleksandra Waliszewska, Ambera Wellmann, Issy Wood, and Amelie von Wulffen.

From top: Christina Quarles, Grounded By Tha Side of Yew, 2017, acrylic on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Pilar Corrias, London; Karolina Jabłońska, Goddess, 2018, oil on canvas; Martyna Borowiecka, Sleepy snakes lay curled up in their secret hides, 2018 oil on canvas; Chelsea Culprit, Cheeseburger in Paradise, 2016, oil, acrylic, mixed media, canvas, 110 x 87 cm. The FED Collection, Mexico; Ambera Wellmann, Now Now, 2018, oil, canvas; Martyna Czech, Yours Forever, 2018, oil on canvas. All images courtesy and © the artists, collectors, and the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw.

SAIDIYA HARTMAN AND ARTHUR JAFA

Join Saidiya Hartman—author of the new book Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments—and Arthur Jafa at the Hammer for a public conversation about their work.

Jafa’s new exhibition at Moderna Museet in Stockholm opens later this month.

SAIDIYA HARTMAN and ARTHUR JAFA in conversation

Thursday, June 6, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Saidiya Hartman, courtesy of the author and Columbia University; Arthur Jafa, Apex, 2018, Luma, Arles, installation views (2); Arthur Jafa, courtesy of the artist.