Category Archives: EDUCATION/ACTIVISM

JORDAN CASTEEL — WITHIN REACH

JORDAN CASTEEL—WITHIN REACH—the exhibition catalog of the artist’s suspended solo show at the New Museum—is edited by Massimiliano Gioni, with a foreword by Lisa Phillips.

The volume includes texts by Dawoud Bey, Lauren Haynes, and Amanda Hunt, and features interviews by Thelma Golden and Gioni.

Jordan Casteel, from top: Shirley (Spa Boutique2Go), 2018, oil on canvas, Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College; Medinilla, Wanda and Annelise, 2019, oil on canvas; Benyam, 2018, oil on canvas, Komal Shah and Gaurav Garg collection;; Serwaa and Amoakohene, 2019, oil on canvas; exhibition catalog cover image courtesy and © the artist and the New Museum; Cansuela, 2019, oil on canvas; Miles and Jojo, 2015, oil on canvas, Lumpkin-Boccuzzi Family Collection; Lourdes and Karina, 2019, oil on canvas; Joe and Mozel (Pompette Wines), 2017, oil on canvas, private collection; Jenna, 2019, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York.

CALARTS POSTER SHOW

Materials from the postponed Redcat exhibition Inside Out & Upside Down—Posters from CalArts: 1970–2019 are available online.

CalArts Archive, from top: Conny Cavazos, Lei Lei, 2019; Onyou Kim and Vivian Naranjo, Martha Friedman, 2017; Florencio Zavala and Victor Hu, Miranda July & Phil Elverum, 2007; Jae-Hyouk Sung, Matmos, 2003; Cassandra Cisneros, Juyoung Kim, and SoYun Cho, Redcat: Cauleen Smith: “Black Utopia LP,” 2013; Jens Gehlhaar, Anthony Hernandez: Landscape for the Homeless, 1997; Bijan Berahimi and Sarah Faith Gottesdiener, No Age & Brian Roettinger, 2013; Angela Bac and Jessie Zo, 2014 CalArts Halloween, 2014; Scott Barry, Rachel Harrison (3/3), 2010; Louise Sandhaus, Ed Fella Farewell Lecture: Educated, Philosofated, Detroitated, Esplicated, 2013; Allison Hsiao, Redcat: Adentro, 2018. Images courtesy and © the artists and CalArts.

NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS

NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS is Eliza Hittman’s third cinéma vérité feature, starring Sidney Flanigan as a young woman from rural Pennsylvania traveling to New York City for an abortion.

The film screened earlier this month at a Film Independent Presents event in Culver City, and is now playing in Hollywood and on the Westside, opening next week in Pasadena.

The spark for my new film came in 2012, when a woman named Savita Halappanavar died of blood poisoning in a hospital in Galway after being refused a life-saving abortion. Out of devastation, I naively began to research the history of abortion rights in Ireland. In a country where abortion was criminalized, I became fascinated to learn that women who needed abortions were forced to travel from Ireland to England. 
 
I began to read more and more about Ireland’s hidden diaspora and saw a compelling untold narrative about ‘women on the run’ traveling with the unbearable burden of shame. These migratory abortion trails also exist within our own country from rural areas with limited and restrictive access, past state lines and into progressive cities. Through extensive research and interviews over several years I developed this script. After premiering Beach Rats at Sundance in 2017 and following the inauguration of Trump, I felt an urgent need to make this film now. The fate of a woman’s fundamental right to access is at risk. If Roe v. Wade is attacked and abortion made illegal nationwide, how far will we have to travel?
 
Savita Halappanavar’s death revolutionized Ireland. It unified feminist groups throughout the country and galvanized a movement to reverse the cruel Eighth Amendment that recognizes the life of a mother and a fetus as being equal. They were activated because her identity was not anonymous. She had a name, a face, a warm smile that the country could feel and mourn. The abortion ban was historically repealed last May. 
 
 Amidst such a fraught moment in U.S. history, it’s hard not to ask myself how I am doing in my artistic practice can create change. Women’s issues are global issues. By taking a social and political issue and demonstrating its impact on one individual or character, my goal is to find ways to get past our audiences’ defenses against this stigmatized subject and open people up to confronting difficult realities. 
 
 As an extension of my body of work, the film balances realism and lyricism, beauty and horror, fear and hope. It is infused with intimacy, discomfort, tension and truth. It will ignite controversy and conversation. Never Rarely Sometimes Always is ultimately a story about resistance and will perhaps even inspire change.Eliza Hittman

NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS

Now Playing.

Arclight Hollywood

6360 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles.

The Landmark

10850 Pico Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

Eliza Hittman, Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020), from top: Sidney Flanigan; Flanigan; U.S. poster; Talia Ryder and Théodore Pellerin; Flanigan. Photographs by Angal Field, images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographer, and Focus Features.

JARRETT EARNEST AND KENNETH SILVER IN CONVERSATION

To celebrate the publication of his exhibition catalogue THE YOUNG AND EVIL: QUEER MODERNISM IN NEW YORK, 1930–1955, editor and curator Jarrett Earnest will join Kenneth E. Silver for a public conversation at The Center in Manhattan.

THE YOUNG AND EVIL—JARRETT EARNEST AND KENNETH SILVER IN CONVERSATION

Tuesday, March 10. Doors at 6:30 pm

The Center

208 West 13th Street, New York City.

From top: Jared FrenchMurder, 1942, courtesy the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, John D. Phillips Fund; Jarret Earnest, photograph by Gregory Aune; Jarret Earnest, editor, The Young and Evil, David Zwirner Books. Images courtesy and © the author, his publisher, the photographer, and David Zwirner.

OKWUI OKPOKWASILI AND PETER BORN — SITTING ON A MAN’S HEAD

SITTING ON A MAN’S HEAD—the durational, audience-participatory work by Okwui Okpokwasili and Peter Born—will be performed at Danspace Project throughout March, 2020, as part of the PLATFORM 2020—Utterances from the Chorus program.

A rotating cast of performers includes Martita Abril, Jennifer Brogle, mayfield brooks, Leslie CuyjetAndré DaughtryEisa Davis, Brittany Engel-Adams, Lily GoldNaja GordonMelanie Greene, Audrey HailesRemi Harris, Jasmine Hearn, Justin Hicks, Shayla-Vie Jenkins, Chaesong Kim, Tendayi Kuumba, Breyanna MaplesPriscilla MarreroAnais MavielMaya OrchinKay Ottinger, jess pretty, Greg PurnellHans Rasch, Katrina Reid, Jean Carla RodeaLily Bo Shapiro, Samita SinhaEleanor Smith, Tatyana Tenenbaum, David Thomson, Pyeng Threadgill, Asiya WadudCharmaine Warren, AJ WilmoreAnna Witenberg, Nehemoyia Young, Okpokwasili, and Born.

OKWUI OKPOKWASILI and PETER BORN—SITTING ON A MAN’S HEAD

Friday, March 6, 13, and 20, from 6 pm to 10 pm.

Danspace Project

St. Mark’s Church

131 East 10th Street, New York City.

Okwui Okpokwasili and Peter Born, Sitting On a Man’s Head, in performance, Berlin Biennale, 2018 (Okpokwasili top right and below center in black dress). Images courtesy and © the artists and participants.