Category Archives: EDUCATION/ACTIVISM

TONY LEWIS AND HAMZA WALKER

In conjunction with CHARLATAN AND ULTIMATELY A BORING MAN—the Tony Lewis exhibition at Blum & Poe that takes as its point of focus the 1965 Cambridge University debate between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr.—Lewis will join Hamza Walker for a talk at the gallery.

TONY LEWIS AND HAMZA WALKER in conversation

Saturday, June 29, from 2 pm to 4 pm.

Blum & Poe

2727 South La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Tony Lewis, from top: …The Gravamen Of Mr. Baldwin’s Charges Against America…, 2019, graphite and Epson UltraChrome ink on paper; Man, 2018, pencil, graphite powder, and correction tape on paper and transparency; Tony Lewis—Charlatan and Ultimately a Boring Man, 2019, Blum & Poe, installation views (2); Boring, 2019, graphite, pencil, and colored pencil on paper mounted on wood (2, first 76 x 99 inches, second 76 x 100 inches); Tony Lewis—Charlatan and Ultimately a Boring Man, 2019, Blum & Poe, installation views (2). Images courtesy and © the artist and Blum & Poe.

YOKO ONO — RIVER TO RIVER FESTIVAL

Yoko Ono’s River to River Festival installations—THE REFLECTION PROJECT and ADD COLOR (REFUGEE BOAT) (1960/2019)—comprise the largest public exhibition of the artist’s work in Lower Manhattan to date.

THE REFLECTION PROJECT is a visual and mnemonic counterpoint to the relentless pace of the everyday, an invitation to connect passersby to moments of personal, meditative pause through the placement of art in non-traditional spaces. Featuring Yoko Ono as the inaugural artist, THE REFLECTION PROJECT seeks to perform urban acupuncture with large-scale art, stimulating the city’s vast nerve network… Each piece is a prompt wherein Ono speaks directly to New Yorkers, rallying the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.”*

THE REFLECTION PROJECT—YOKO ONO*

Through June 29.

28 Liberty
Fulton Transit Center
Oculus at the WTC Transportation Hub
Seaport District, and other locations in Lower Manhattan.

YOKO ONO—ADD COLOR (REFUGEE BOAT)

Through June 29.

Seaport District

203 Front Street, New York City.

Yoko Ono, from top: The Reflection Project; Add Color (Refugee Boat), photograph by Ian Douglas; Add Color (Refugee Boat), photograph by Brian J. Green; The Reflection Project. Images courtesy and © Yoko Ono, the photographers, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.

RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE

DISRUPTION TACTICS: RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE—a panel discussion moderated by Gregg Bordowitz—”will bring together artists, activists, and writers to explore legacies of radical queer publishing and print culture from the 1970s to today.”

Celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of Stonewall and the new edition of THE FAGGOTS AND THEIR FRIENDS BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS—written by Larry Mitchell and illustrated by Ned Asta—the event “will feature readings of historic manifestos and texts.”

DISRUPTION TACTICS—RADICAL QUEER PUBLISHING AND PRINT CULTURE

Tuesday, June 18, at 7 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

Larry Mitchell, The Faggots and Their Friends Between Revolutions (Brooklyn: Nightboat Books, 2019). Design and illustrations by Ned Asta, courtesy and © the artist and Nightboat Books.

NINA MENKES

“QUEEN OF DIAMONDS is my very personal portrait of the United States: an over-enlarged, profit-motivated core surrounded by mute and arid alienation. The female protagonist is both deeply estranged and psychically powerful. Her loner position is the backside of centuries of Western Heroes: she stands in the center as watcher and victim of a system which is starting to crack.” — Nina Menkes

The UCLA Film and Television program Nina Menkes, Cinematic Sorceress features a double-bill of two of Menkes’ key works—both starring her sister Tinka Menkes—including the 4K restoration of QUEEN OF DIAMONDS (1991). The filmmaker will be on hand to discuss her work.

QUEEN OF DIAMONDS shares not only the formal sophistication and structural rigor of Barbara Loden’s Wanda (1970) and Chantal Akerman’s Jeanne Dielman (1975) but also their themes: female alienation and the ways that passivity, muteness, and a refusal to engage can serve as forms of resistance to patriarchal oppression. Ironically, these same themes helped to eclipse the three works—and many others like them—for too long.” — Sarah Resnick

QUEEN OF DIAMONDS and THE BLOODY CHILD

Saturday, June 15, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

See Bérénice Reynaud on Menkes.

From top: Tinka Menkes in Queen of Diamonds (5); Tinka Menkes in The Bloody Child (2). Images courtesy and © Nina Menkes and Arbelos Films.