Category Archives: FASHION

MACHINE DAZZLE’S TREASURE

Coincident with New York Fashion Week, Machine Dazzle—artist, maximalist, and Taylor Mac’s costumier—presents TREASURE.

“Undressing layers of his past to make sense of the present, Machine will introduce twelve new looks alongside stories stitched together through song.”*

This musical performance piece will be accompanied by musical director Viva DeConcini and her band.

MACHINE DAZZLE—TREASURE*

Thursday through Saturday, September 5, 6, and 7.

All shows at 7:30 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Machine Dazzle; Machine Dazzle, Treasure (3); young Machine Dazzle of the Dazzle Dancers, photograph by Mr. Means. Images courtesy and © the artist.

OOGA BOOGA — CLOSING WEEKEND

In 2017, when Ooga Booga founder Wendy Yao was awarded the White Columns/Shoot the Lobster award—”presented annually to individuals who selflessly create a context for other artists’ ideas and seek to build communities around them”— Asher Penn wrote:

Ooga Booga has become a non-institutional hub within the Los Angeles area; a go-to place for its selection of books, multiples, fashion items, and accessories. Outside Los Angeles, Ooga Booga is an icon of independent entrepreneurship, participating in art and book fairs, opening temporary satellite stores, creating online resources for independent publishers, and organizing events in various venues. 

PARIS LA is one of countless publications that Yao has supported over the years, facilitating introductions to future collaborators and providing a platform for imagination to take flight.

Ooga Booga’s Chinatown store is closing this weekend—Sunday, September 1 is the last day. Stop by and visit one last time. (The web shop is scheduled to continue operations.)

OOGA BOOGA

943 North Broadway, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Wendy Yao, KCET; Ooga Booga, Chinatown, exterior and interior (2); Excursus III: Ooga Booga at ICA in Philadelphia, 2012, photograph by Alex Klein; Ooga Booga II at 356 Mission; sign in Chinatown, Los Angeles. Images courtesy and © Wendy Yao and the photographers.

YOUNG SOUL REBELS

London, 1977. A year of nascent punk rock explosion and the rebirth of soul. Pirate DJs and the Queen’s Jubilee. Love on the run and racist skinheads on the prowl. YOUNG SOUL REBELS—an early feature by Isaac Julien—is part-thriller, part-musical, and a groundbreaking exemplar of the New Queer Cinema movement of the 1990s.

Starring Mo Sesay, Valentine Nonyela, Jason Durr, and Sophie Okonedo, the film screens this week in Westwood as part of the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project Screening Series.

YOUNG SOUL REBELS

Friday, August 16, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater, Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard., Los Angeles.

Isaac Julien, Young Soul Rebels (1991). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker.

ALTERED AFTER

ALTERED AFTER—a group show at Participant Inc featuring work by Darrel Ellis, fierce pussy, General Idea, Jerry the Marble Faun, Leslie Kaliades, Kang Seung Lee, Ronald Lockett, Jonathan Molina Garcia, Cookie Mueller, Raúl de Nieves, Jason Simon, Manuel Solano, Gail Thacker, Julie Tolentino, and XFR Collective—incorporates “archives, archaeology, salvaged objects, material migrations, inherited knowledge, and bequests in response to HIV/AIDS.”*

The exhibition is curated by Conrad Ventur for Visual AIDS.

“I’ve learned that we have to find our own saviors. For me, I like to create a fantasy, and one of the ways I’ve found beauty is by stacking beads on top of each other. I usually work in circles and let time shape the work…

“I guess I choose shoes as a vehicle to adorn myself, to give off different identities… The shoes are very organic. I actually see them grow. It pushes me to want to learn more about weight and design, to push them into new forms. But I also want them to design themselves in a way.” — Raúl de Nieves

In conjunction with ALTERED AFTER, Anthology Film Archives and Visual AIDS present RECORD TIME, a free evening of films and videos on August 8, curated by Carmel Curtis and Leeroy Kun Young Kang.

The program includes SOMETHING FIERCE (1989)—Greg Bordowitz and Jean Carlomusto’s video for Gay Men’s Health CrisisColin Campbell’s SKIN (1990), Nguyen Tan Hoang’s K.I.P. (2002), Hayat Hyatt’s VILLANELLE (2015), Tran T. Kim-Trang’s KORE (1994), Barbara Hammer’s VITAL SIGNS (1991), and Jim Hubbard’s THE DANCE (1992).

ALTERED AFTER*

Through August 18.

Participant, Inc

253 East Houston Street, #1, New York City.

RECORD TIME film program

Thursday, August 8, at 7:30 pm.

Anthology Film Archives

32 Second Avenue (at 2nd Street), New York City.

Altered After, Participant, Inc, 2019, from top: Manuel Solano, Untitled, from the series, An Interior, A Sensation, An Instant, 2019, acrylic on canvas, courtesy and © the artist and Peres Projects, Berlin; Darrel Ellis, Untitled (from Thomas Ellis photo of child’s birthday party), circa 1990, gelatin silver print, courtesy and © the Estate of Darrel Ellis and OSMOS; Altered After installation views (3), including shoes by Raúl de Nieves; fierce pussy, Flag, 1992/2019, five photocopies on paper, courtesy and © the artist; Greg Bordowitz and Jean Carlomusto for Gay Men’s Health Crisis, Something Fierce (1989, 3:30 minutes, video), still, courtesy and © the artists and ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries; Colin Campbell, Skin (1990, 18 min, 16mm), still, courtesy and © the artist and V Tape; Altered After installation view, including a painting by Darrel Ellis and a section of Kang Seung Lee, Untitled  (Garden) , 2018, 24K Nishijin gold thread on Sambe, ceramic (California clay, soils from Derek Jarman’s Garden, Nam San, Tapgol Park), pebbles from Dungeness and Tapgol Park, metal parts and dried plants from Derek Jarman’s Garden, courtesy and © the artist and ONE AND J. Gallery, Seoul; Kang Seung Lee, Untitled (Garden) detail; Jason Simon, Untitled (Video Against AIDS), 2013. three facsimile cassette wraps and original printed materials designed by Hannah H. Alderfer, courtesy and © the artist and Callicoon Fine Arts, New York; detail of Altered After exhibition catalog cover, designed by Jean Foos, image by Leslie Kaliades, still from Altered After, 1997, video, black and white, sound, 4:45 minutes; Altered After installation views (2); Tran T. Kim-Trang, Kore (1994, 17 min, video), still, courtesy and © the artist and Video Data Bank. Images courtesy Participant, Inc.

FUNNY FACE, PARIS BLUES

Pink is the navy blue of India. — Diana Vreeland

Long before her international fame as editor-in-chief of Vogue in the sixties and the “Empress of Fashion” at the Met’s Costume Institute in the seventies and eighties, Diana Vreeland was a legend in Manhattan creative circles. As Harper’s Bazaar‘s fashion editor, she was the inspiration for Allison Du Bois in the Kurt Weill-Ira Gershwin-Moss Hart musical Lady in the Dark (1941). And Kay Thompson played Maggie Prescott, a version of Vreeland, in the dazzling Paramount musical FUNNY FACE (1957, directed by Stanley Donen).

Upon discovering Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn), a lovely, philosophical clerk in a Greenwich Village bookstore, Prescott and photographer Dick Avery (Fred Astaire, in a role based on Richard Avedon) sweep Jo uptown for a test shoot. Maggie orders her office minions to chop off Jo’s hair and paint her with a “marvelous mouth.” Jo resists, but gives in once she realizes her new modeling gig comes with a paid trip to Paris, home of Jean-Paul Sartre.

This weekend, as part of its series Runaway Hollywood—Global Production in a Postwar World, the UCLA Film and Television Archive will screen FUNNY FACE, followed by the black-and-white Paul Newman-Sidney Poitier vehicle PARIS BLUES (1961, directed by Martin Ritt). The story of two American jazz musicians in Paris, the tourists they fall for (Joanne Woodward and Diahann Carroll), and the Latin Quarter dives at the center of their expat scene, PARIS BLUES features a score composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn.

FUNNY FACE and PARIS BLUES

Saturday, July 27, at 7:30 pm.

Billy Wilder Theater—Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face; Kay Thompson performing the “Think Pink” number; Thompson, Fred Astaire, and Hepburn after wrapping up “Bonjour, Paris!”; Verve album cover; Diahann Carroll and Sidney Poitier in Paris Blues; Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman; Louis Armstrong (left), Poitier, and Newman on set.