Category Archives: FASHION

GIRLS LIKE US LAUNCH

Biography—the 12th issue of GIRLS LIKE US—features interviews with Amy Sillman and Marilyn Waring, a poem by Hanne Lippard, and articles, essays, and projects by Nadia Hebson, Jill Johnston, Rebecca E. Karl, Nina Lykke, Sara Manente, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Chris E. Vargas, and Amy Suo Wu, among others.

Join Jessica Gysel, Sara Kaaman, Katja Mater, and Marnie Slater for the issue’s launch in Rotterdam.

GIRLS LIKE US LAUNCH—BIOGRAPHY

Sunday, December 29, from 4 pm to 8 pm.

Tender Center

Zaagmolenstraat 127a, Rotterdam.

Girls Like Us, from top: “Biography” launch announcement, “More or less female” T-shirt by Everybody; “Second witch in a week!” T-shirt by Butchcamp; Girls Like Us issue 12 cover; “Titty Tote”; “The Lesbian Body” T-shirt, featuring excerpt from Monique Wittig’s text. Images courtesy and © the designers, the authors, the photographers, the models, and Girls Like Us.

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER

I live in a world now where everything is “delegated” to photography. Nothing is left to memory, your own memory. What I’m interested in, instead, are things that can’t be seen, not those that can be… I have always labored under the illusion—but I also think it was true—that nobody ever photographed me. Because my face is not for sale. The real me is not photographable.Benedetta Barzini, to Beniamino Barrese

Beniamino Barrese is the son of Benedetta Barzini—the first Italian model to appear on the cover of American Vogue—and his mother’s obsessive interlocutor throughout his documentary THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER, one of the year’s best.

Summoned by Diana Vreeland in the mid-1960s to come to New York for a few weeks, Barzini stayed for a few years, a sought-after subject of Richard Avedon, Bert Stern, and Andy Warhol, a confident of Gerard Malanga and Salvador Dalí, and an acquaintance of Marcel Duchamp.

Barzini was a double-rebel. Modeling in Manhattan put a necessary distance between Barzini and her parents—heiress Giannalisa Feltrinelli and writer Luigi Barzini, Jr., author of The Italians. But the trajectory of second-wave feminism in the 1970s opened Barzini’s eyes to the ornamental condition of women, and she returned to Italy and became an activist and left-wing academic.

I asked myself this question: Why do we have prototypes of beauty? Why are models at the bow of the ship and the other women are squashed together into the stern? Why? Because men invent women… Maybe it would be better if female bodies disappeared from men’s imaginations.Benedetta Barzini

Barzani explains to her son that the camera is a dangerous liar because within its capture of arbitrary moments, it “freezes” life “within a limited boundary,” contaminating thought and inscribing conformity. “I don’t like frozen things… I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but there are a hundred million photos of sunsets. Frankly, they’re all the same. But they weren’t the same when you saw them.”

Barzini is by turns loving and exasperated with her son and his never-ending investment in images and their documentation. Yet Barzini still models herself—recently appearing in Simone Rocha‘s Fall-Winter 2017 show in London. Nothing if not contradictory, Barzini wants to remove herself from a world she finds deplorable, railing against ambiguity yet unsure which entrance to the void she should walk through. She explains to Barrese that their work together on this film is an act of “separation.” The filmmaker sees it differently, and together they find a sense of an ending.

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER

Now playing.

Laemmle Monica Film Center

1332 2nd Street, Santa Monica.

Quad Cinema

34 West 13th Street, New York City.

Beniamino Barrese, The Disappearance of My Mother (2019), from top: Benedetta Barzini (3); Barrese and Barzini (2); Richard Avedon spread of Barzini in American Vogue; Barzini on the cover of Vogue Italia, September 1967; Simone Rocha Fall-Winter 2017 show, London; Andy Warhol, Benedetta Barzini Screen Test, 1966; Barzini and Marcel Duchamp, filmed at the artist’s Cordier and Ekstrom Gallery opening by Warhol, 1966 (2); The Disappearance of My Mother U.S. poster; Barzini (5). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the photographers, Benedetta Barzini, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Condé Nast, and Kino Lorber.

DONNA DE SALVO ON WARHOL

As part of the Warhol Lecture Series, Donna De Salvo—curator of the exhibition ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN, organized by the Whitney and now at the Art Institute of Chicago—will talk about the artist’s impact and importance, followed by a reception and dinner on the Near North Side.

DONNA DE SALVO

Wednesday, November 20, at 6 pm.

Art Institute of Chicago, Fullerton Hall

111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago.

Reception and Dinner

Luxbar

18 East Bellevue Place, Chicago.

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again, Art Institute of Chicago, October 20– January 26, 2020, from top: Self-Portrait, 1966, Art Institute of Chicago; Gun, 1981–82, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Nine Jackies, 1964, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Ladies and Gentlemen (Marsha P. Johnson), 1975, Museum Brandhorst, Munich; Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Skull, 1976, collection Larry Gagosian; Big Electric Chair, 1967–1968, Art Institute of Chicago; Shot Orange Marilyn, 1964. Images courtesy and © the lenders and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

PIA CAMIL OPENING

To celebrate the installation of HERE COMES THE SUN—her new work for the Guggenheim rotunda—join Pia Camil in conversation with Pablo León de la Barra for a discussion of her practice, with a reception to follow.

HERE COMES THE SUN, a crowdsourced fabric sculpture, “extends the artist’s engagement with collaboration, the impact of consumer culture, contemporary trade routes, and the legacies of modernism.”*

PIA CAMIL and PABLO LEÓN DE LA BARRA IN CONVERSATION*

Friday, November 8, at 6:30.

PIA CAMIL—HERE COMES THE SUN RECEPTION

Friday, November 8, at 7:30 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Pia Camil; Camil, Telón de boca, Museo Universitario del Chopo, Mexico City, 2018, installation view; Camil, Bara bara bara, Tramway, Glasgow, 2019, installation view. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, the exhibiting institutions, and Blum & Poe.

MACHINE DAZZLE’S TREASURE

Coincident with New York Fashion Week, Machine Dazzle—artist, maximalist, and Taylor Mac’s costumier—presents TREASURE.

“Undressing layers of his past to make sense of the present, Machine will introduce twelve new looks alongside stories stitched together through song.”*

This musical performance piece will be accompanied by musical director Viva DeConcini and her band.

MACHINE DAZZLE—TREASURE*

Thursday through Saturday, September 5, 6, and 7.

All shows at 7:30 pm.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top: Machine Dazzle; Machine Dazzle, Treasure (3); young Machine Dazzle of the Dazzle Dancers, photograph by Mr. Means. Images courtesy and © the artist.