Category Archives: FILM

BI GAN’S LONG DAY’S JOURNEY

Like Gaspar Noe‘s recent Climax, Bi Gan‘s LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT is a divided dreamscape, where the opening titles show up halfway through the film, at which point the work descends into a deeper darkness.

Climax essentially ends after the exhilarating dance sequence that makes up its first forty-five minutes, and the remainder of the film is an exercise in nihilistic free fall. But Bi’s new work—the 28-year-old’s second feature—jumps a dimension as its second half begins, when the weary protagonist (played by Jue Huang) walks into a cinema, takes a seat, puts on a pair of 3-D glasses (signaling that you, the audience, should do the same), and…

During a period of exceptionally strong Chinese and South Korean noir—see Lee Chang-Dong‘s Burning, Jia Zhangke‘s Ash is Purest White, and An Elephant Sitting Still, the first and last film by the late Hu BoLONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT is the most elliptical of the group. It’s a tale of lost love, dead ends, chance meetings, subconscious triggers—a movie that is a memory of itself.

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT—3-D

Landmark

10850 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Wei Tang and Yongzhong Chen in Long Day’s Journey Into Night; Jue Huang; Hong-Chi Lee; Yongzhong Chen. Photographs by Liu Hongyu, except Jue, photograph by Bai Linghai. Images courtesy of Kino Lorber.

I AM CUBA — SASHA CALZATTI IN CONVERSATION

I AM CUBA—now playing at the Downtown Independent in a beautiful 4K restoration—is the landmark Cuban-Soviet one-off directed by Mikhail Kalatozov in the early 1960s.

On the closing evening of the run, the film’s camera operator Alexander “Sasha” Calzatti will participate in a post-screening Q & A.

I AM CUBA

Through April 21.

SASHA CALZATTI post-screening Q & A

Sunday, April 21, at 5:30 pm.

Downtown Independent

251 South Main Street, Los Angeles.

I Am Cuba images courtesy of Milestone Films.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

The paintings of Ben Shahn, Antonio Berni, Raquel Forner, Honoré Sharrer, and Pavel Tchelitchew, the photography of Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, the sculpture of Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, the ballet costumes of Kurt Seligmann, Paul Cadmus, and Jared French, the music of Virgil Thomson, and the philosophy of George Gurdjieff

… all come together in LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN, the Museum of Modern Art exhibition devoted to the writer, critic, curator, patron, and impresario who set the aesthetic template for MOMA and brought George Balanchine to America to establish the New York City Ballet.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

Through June 15.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

This summer MOMA‘s West 53rd Street location will close for four months—June 15 through October 21—for reconstruction.

From top: George Platt LynesLincoln Kirstein, circa 1948, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes; Paul Cadmus, set design for the ballet Filling Station, 1937, cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941, © 2018 estate of Paul Cadmus; Walker EvansRoadside View, Alabama Coal Area Town, 1936, gelatin silver print, printed circa 1969 by Charles RodemeyerMuseum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the artist, © 2019 Walker Evans Archive, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Paul CadmusBallet Positions, drawing for the primer Ballet Alphabet, 1939, ink, pencil, colored ink, and gouache on paper (letters reversed on drawing), Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein, © 2019 estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel TchelitchewHide-and-Seek. 1940–42, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Harvard Society for Contemporary Art pamphlet. 1931–32, Harvard Society for Contemporary Art scrapbooks, vol. 2 (Autumn 1930–33), Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York; Ben ShahnBartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco, 1931–32, gouache on paper on board, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of Ben Shahn / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Pavel Tchelitchew, study for a backdrop for the ballet Apollon Musagète, 1942, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein; George Platt LynesLew Christensen in Apollon Musagète, June 24, 1937, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes.


DASH SNOW — THE DROWNED WORLD

“Dash [Snow] and David Hammons are both artists with a witch-doctor feel to their work, which is important, because ultimately what is the value of art?… In an increasingly secular society, it’s even more important as people try to form their belief systems. If you’re not going the readymade route, then you look around for the tools available to make something of your own. That’s a big part of the artist’s job or the writer’s job…

“It’s found in the moment, not in an academic way. You find it in the practice. I think the academic and institutional part of the art world is a big problem. Artists often collaborate with them to their detriment, because they think they need the institution as a go-between, a translator for the public. Dash, like Hammons, understood that you don’t need the middleman. Cut out the middleman. Make him wait in line with everyone else. It has to be on the artist’s terms.” — Glenn O’Brien on Dash Snow*

The new exhibition THE DROWNED WORLD presents work from the late artist’s archive, including a selection of rarely seen sculptures.

DASH SNOW—THE DROWNED WORLD

Through May 12.

Participant Inc

253 East Houston Street, New York City.

*”I Don’t Believe in Masterpieces AnywayGlenn O’Brien on Dash Snow,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

See David Rimanelli on Snow.

Dash Snow, from top: Mixed-media sculpture, 2000–2009; The Drowned World: Selections from the Dash Snow Archive, 2019, installation view, Participant Inc, New York, photograph by Mark Waldhauser; Untitled, 2000–2009, Polaroid (Kunle Martins (left) and Snow); Untitled (Past, Present), 2006, mixed-media sculpture; Untitled, 2007, collage; Untitled (Her Kisses Were Dangerous), 2006–2007, collage. Images © Dash Snow, courtesy of the Dash Snow Archive, New York City and Participant Inc. Special thanks to Lia Gangitano.

CLAIRE DENIS IN SANTA MONICA

For the opening night of the American Cinematheque program Salt, Sweat and Sunshine—The Cinema of Claire Denis, the director will join L.A. Times writer Mark Olsen for an onstage conversation at the Aero, followed by a double-bill of CHOCOLAT and WHITE MATERIAL, both of which reference Denis’ upbringing in colonial French Africa.

On Saturday afternoon, Denis will present BEAU TRAVAIL and participate in a post-screening discussion with Justin Chang.

Double-features will fill the rest of the weekend, with pairings of NÉNETTE ET BONI with 35 RHUMS, both with Alex Descas, and TROUBLE EVERY DAY with LET THE SUNSHINE IN, each featuring Nicolas Duvauchelle.

CLAIRE DENIS—CHOCOLAT and WHITE MATERIAL

Friday, April 12, at 7:30

CLAIRE DENIS—BEAU TRAVAIL

Saturday, April 13, at 5 pm.

NÉNETTE ET BONI and 35 RHUMS

Saturday, April 13, at 7:30 pm.

TROUBLE EVERY DAY and LET THE SUNSHINE IN

Sunday, April 14, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1321 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Cécile Ducasse and Isaach De Bankolé in Chocolat (1988); Alice Houri in Nénette et Boni (1996); Grégoire Colin (left) and Denis Lavant in Beau Travail (1999); Béatrice Dalle in Trouble Every Day (2001); Mati Diop and Alex Descas in 35 rhums (2008); Isabelle Huppert in White Material (2009); Juliette Binoche and Nicolas Duvauchelle in Let the Sunshine In (2017).