Category Archives: LITERATURE/POETRY

THE JUDAS KISS

This is the final week of the local production of THE JUDAS KISS, David Hare‘s brilliant take on the last years of Oscar Wilde and his doomed relationship with Alfred, Lord Douglas—known to Wilde and the world as “Bosie.”

The play is directed by Michael Michetti, and Rob Nagle‘s uncanny portrayal of the iconoclastic Irish playwright is definitive.

THE JUDAS KISS

Monday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday

March 18, 21, 22, and 23, at 8 pm.

Saturday and Sunday, March 23 and 24, at 2 pm.

Boston Court Pasadena

70 North Mentor Avenue, Pasadena.

From top: Rob Nagle, (right) as Oscar Wilde, and Colin Bates, as Alfred, Lord Douglas, in The Judas Kiss; Bates, Kurt Kanazawa, and Nagle; Nagle (left) and Darius de la Cruz. Photographs by Jenny Graham, courtesy of Boston Court Pasadena.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS — PAST TENSE

“As much as I’m engaged with it, with violence, I remain ever hopeful that change is possible and necessary, and that we will get there. I believe that strongly, and representing that matters to me: a sense of aspiration, a sense of good will, a sense of hope, a sense of this idea that one has the right, that we have the right to be as we are.” — Carrie Mae Weems*

The timeless themes of political power, social justice, gender oppression, and valiant persistence are brought to life in a modern context in PAST TENSE, Carrie Mae Weems’ multimedia take on Antigone.

Combining music, spoken word, video, and projected images, PAST TENSE—presented this week in Los Angeles by CAP UCLA—includes works by poet Carl Hancock Rux and composer Craig Harris, and will be performed by Weems, Eisa Davis, Francesca Harper, David Parker, Imani Uzuri, and Alicia Hall Moran, who brought the house down at Disney Hall earlier this week in Bryce Dessner’s Triptych.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS—PAST TENSE

Friday, March 8, at 8 pm.

Theatre at Ace Hotel

929 South Broadway, downtown Los Angeles.

*Megan O’Grady, “Carrie Mae Weems,” T: The New York Times Style Magazine, October 21, 2018, 140.

From top: Carrie Mae Weems, Past Tense, in performance; Past Tense production photographs (2) by William Strugs; Carrie Mae Weems, portrait by Jerry Klineberg; Past Tense, in performance with, from right, Alicia Hall Moran, Imani Uzuri, and Eisa Davis. Images courtesy CAP UCLA.

HAL FOSTER IN CONVERSATION

“I’m a writer first, a critic-historian-theorist second. That said, I’ve never wanted the writing to be self-involved or involuted; I’ve always wanted to be as lucid as possible—difficult but lucid… I don’t like it when criticism becomes subjectivist; that’s not much more than sensibility criticism come again…

“Most people think we are in a ‘post-critical age’; they even hope we are. I understand the fatigue with the negativity of criticism, but mostly that fatigue is laziness—and an anti-intellectualism that is far more American than apple pie ever was. It’s obvious that we need criticism now more than ever.” — Hal Foster*

Hal Foster—who is a visiting Getty scholar this semester and whose new book collects fifteen years of conversations with Richard Serra—recently spoke at LACMA, and will give two more public conversations over the next week or so.

JASON E. SMITH PRESENTS HAL FOSTER

Tuesday, February 26, at 7:30 pm

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

HAL FOSTER AND CHARLES RAY

Wednesday, March 6, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Westwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Hal Foster,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 154.

From top: Hal Foster, courtesy Hammer Museum; book cover credits: Yale University Press; Verso Books (cover illustration, Isa Genzken, X-Ray, 1991, black-and-white photograph, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin and Cologne); The New Press.

THE YOUNG AND EVIL

“Dinner with Paul Cadmus in the Village. He showed me a hundred drawings or more; the nakedest and least disinterested are the best, particularly those of Jared French. Until lately they have shared this apartment, an oddly un-American interior; good shabby antiques; a quantity of books and music, charming evidence of self-education. Late in the evening a youth named Lloyd Goff, who was Paul’s assistant, wandered in, at his ease, sleepy, perhaps tipsy. Soon he threw himself on the couch and fell asleep… Paul and I talked and talked, reminiscence and theory, in that particular mood of ours, or of his: smiling relaxation, solemn boyish idealism, who knows what else…

“Goff then woke up and undertook to say goodnight, but the next thing I knew, there he lay again, sprawled face down on another couch, his clothes all drawn on the bias and tight upon his very fine little back and buttocks. At last I gave up whatever impulse it was that had kept me so late. Paul fondly accompanied me to the subway. Perhaps, he said, he would make a drawing or two before he went to bed; our talk had been so stimulating, and a sleeping model suits him…” — Glenway Westcott, 1937*

Falling between last year’s Nick Mauss: Transmissions at the Whitney and next month’s Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern at MOMA, THE YOUNG AND EVIL—curated by Jarrett Earnest at David Zwirner—looks at the between-the-wars Neorealist-Romantic circles around the artists Jared French, his lover Paul Cadmus, his wife Margaret Hoening French (collectively known as PaJaMa), Cadmus’ sister Fidelma—who was married to Kirstein—Bernard Perlin, Pavel Tchelitchew, George Tooker, and Jensen Yow.

Taking its title from the 1933 collaborative novel by art critic Parker Tyler and poet Charles Henri Ford (Tchelitchew’s lover), the exhbition features never-before-exhibited photographs—many from the Kinsey Institute—rarely seen major paintings, sculptures, drawings, and ephemera of this American Bloomsbury, which included Katherine Anne Porter and the ménage à trois of writer Glenway Westcott, publisher Monroe Wheeler, and George Platt Lynes, who photographed (and often modeled for) them all.

THE YOUNG AND EVIL exhibition catalogue will be published later this year by David Zwirner Books, featuring new scholarship by Ann Reynolds and Kenneth E. Silver.

THE YOUNG AND EVIL

Through April 13.

David Zwirner

533 West 19th Street, New York City.

*Continual Lessons: The Journals of Glenway Westcott, 1937–1955, edited by Robert Phelps with Jerry Rosco (New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1990), 8–9.

Also see: By With To & From: A Lincoln Kirstein Reader, edited by Nicholas Jenkins (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1991).

From top: Paul Cadmus, Stone Blossom: A Conversation Piece, 1939–1940, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Juliana Cheyney Edwards Collection and Seth K. Sweetser Fund, © 2019 Estate of Paul Cadmus / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY; Paul Cadmus, Monroe Wheeler, 1938, © 2019 Estate of Paul Cadmus / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY; Jared French, Murder, 1942, courtesy the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, John D. Phillips Fund; Fidelma Cadmus Kirstein, Two Women, circa 1930–1939; Pavel Tchelitchew, Portrait, 1935; Pavel Tchelitchew, The Lion Boy, 1936–1937, private collection, New Jersey; Pavel Tchelitchew, George Platt Lynes, circa 1937–1942; Paul Cadmus, Shore Leave, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, gift of Malcolm S. Forbes, © 2019 Estate of Paul Cadmus / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

WOJNAROWICZ — LOTRINGER — SCEMAMA

Following a screening of DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA, Lotringer and Amy Scholder will join Hedi El Kholti for a conversation about Scemama’s film and Wojnarowicz’s life and work.*

The film intercuts footage from Lotringer‘s extensive 1989 interview with Wojnarowicz—itself filmed by Scemama—with documents from the artist’s estate and papers, and Scemama’s personal archives.

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ—A CONVERSATION WITH SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER AND MARION SCEMAMA

Tuesday, February 19, at 7:30 pm.

ArtCenter College of Design

Hillside Campus

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena.

*At the recent Berlinale, the film screened under the title SELF-PORTRAIT IN 23 ROUNDS: A CHAPTER IN DAVID WOJNAROWICZ’S LIFE, 1989–1991.

David Wojnarowicz. Images courtesy Marion Scemama.