Category Archives: PHOTOGRAPHY

PEDRO ALMODÓVAR — WAITING FOR THE LIGHT

WAITING FOR THE LIGHT, a new exhibition of photographs by Pedro Almodóvar, can be seen at Marlborough through the end of next month.

PEDRO ALMODÓVAR—WAITING FOR THE LIGHT

Through June 29.

Marlborough

40 West 57th Street, New York City.

Pedro Almodóvar—Waiting for the Light, digital prints on paper and dibond, from top: To Morandi, 2018; Menina, 2019; Explosion of Spring 1, 2018; Untitled 1, 2018; Homage To Zurbaran, 2018. Images courtesy and © the artist and Marlborough.

VINCE ALETTI’S ISSUES

Who better than Vince Aletti to organize and aggregate a virtual tour of his massive and coveted collection of periodicals into the pages of a deluxe art book?

Something like this awaits the readers of ISSUES, a new publication from Phaidon.

The book includes work by Diane Arbus, Corinne Day, Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Edward Steichen, Toni Frissell, Irving Penn, Horst, Collier Schorr, Inez Van Lamsweerde, Vinoodh Matadin, Bill Cunningham, and Cindy Sherman.

VINCE ALETTI—ISSUES: A HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN FASHION MAGAZINES (London: Phaidon, 2019).

From top: Horst P. Horst, Vogue, June 1, 1940, cover model Lisa Fonssagrives; Melvin Sokolsky, Harper’s Bazaar, March 1963, model Simone D’Aillencourt; Vince Aletti‘s apartment, photographed by Jason Schmidt, courtesy of the photographer and Phaidon; Corinne Day, The Face, July 1990, model Kate Moss.

JEAN BAUDRILLARD AT CHÂTEAU SHATTO

A selection of the photographs of Jean BaudrillardTHE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I—is now on view at Château Shatto.

“It is not true that we need to believe in our own existence to live… Our consciousness is never in fact the echo of our own reality, of our existence in ‘real time,’ but rather the echo in delayed time, the dispersion screen of the subject and its identity. We are only distinguishable from ourselves in sleep, unconsciousness, and death. This consciousness, which is something altogether different than belief, comes more spontaneously from challenging reality, from siding with objective illusion than from objective reality. This challenge is more vital for our survival and for the survival of the species than the belief in reality and existence, which are spiritual consolations for use in another world.” — Jean Baudrillard*

JEAN BAUDRILLARD—THE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I

Through May 25.

Château Shatto

1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030, downtown Los Angeles.

*Jean Baudrillard, La Pensée radicale (Paris: Sens & Tonka, 1994); “Radical Thought,” in The Conspiracy of Art, edited by Sylvère Lotringer and translated by Ames Hodges (New York: Semiotext(e), 2005), 162–177.

From top: Jean Baudrillard, St. Clément II, 1988, front and reverse; Baudrillard.

GORDON PARKS’ EARLY WORK

The exhibition GORDON PARKS—THE NEW TIDE, EARLY WORK 1940–1950G looks at his mid-century work from the time when “images began to proliferate in picture magazines and on television,” providing an “engaging study of the competing purposes and meanings” of his commissions—journalistic, governmental, industrial, and fashion.*

GORDON PARKS—THE NEW TIDE, EARLY WORK 1940–1950*

Through June 9.

Cleveland Museum of Art

11150 East Boulevard, Cleveland.

Gordon Parks, gelatin silver prints, from top: Self-Portrait, 1941; Washington, D.C. Government charwoman, [Ella Watson],1942; Tenement Dwellers, Chicago, 1950; Paris Fashions, 1949. Images courtesy and © the Gordon Parks Foundation.

CORNELIA HEDIGER AT PENTIMENTI

Cornelia Hediger‘s DOPPELGÄNGER is now on view in Philadelphia.

“The DOPPELGÄNGER series of photographs are pictorial narratives that explore internal human emotions, notions of the uncanny, the subconscious/conscious mind, the ego and the alter ego. The narrative structure itself is based upon and utilizes the concept of the Doppelgänger—specifically as understood within Germanic literature: a ghostly double or apparition of a living person, widely assumed to be sinister and a harbinger of bad luck, but also highly ambiguous, thus presenting a psychological dilemma. The central characters are enacted by the artist herself within claustrophobic and timeless spaces.

“The structural device of the tableaux-vivant is used to carefully choreograph multiple individual, full-frame photographs into single artworks, using a grid system that also serves to maintain the photographic integrity of each photograph. Most of the artworks are constructed with six photographs, but as the series has progressed they have developed in complexity, incorporating up to twelve.” — Cornelia Hediger

CORNELIA HEDIGER—DOPPELGÄNGER

Through June 15.

Pentimenti Gallery

145 North Second Street, Philadelphia.

Cornelia Hediger, digital C-prints, from top: Doppelgänger 06.21.07, 2007; Doppelgänger 05.18.09, 2009; Doppelgänger 08.02.10, 2010; Doppelgänger 11.26.09, 2009; Doppelgänger 07.20.07, 2007; Doppelgänger 01.22.09, 2009; Doppelgänger 10.03.08, 2008; Doppelgänger 04.21.11, 2011; Doppelgänger 12.03.07, 2007. Images courtesy of the artist and Pentimenti Gallery.