Category Archives: PHOTOGRAPHY

TRAJAL HARRELL — TRANSCORPOREALITIES

The Museum Ludwig ex­hi­bi­tion TRANSCORPOREALITIES “re­flects on the mu­se­um as a perme­able body in which vari­ous bi­o­log­i­cal, so­cial, tech­no­log­i­cal, po­lit­i­cal, and eco­nom­ic sys­tems flow in­to each other. Like all hu­man and non­hu­man en­ti­ties, it en­gages in per­pe­t­u­al metabolic pro­cess­es with its en­vi­ron­ment.”

On opening night—as well as Saturday and Sunday, November 30 and December 1—Trajal Harrell will perform a new work Dancer of the Year.

TRANSCORPOREALITIES participating artists also include Jesse Dar­ling, Fla­ka Hal­i­ti, Paul Ma­heke, Nick Mauss, Park McArthur, Os­car Muril­lo, and Son­dra Per­ry.

TRANSCORPOREALITIES*

Opening night:

TRAJAL HARRELL—DANCER OF THE YEAR

Friday, September 20, at 8:30 pm.

Exhibition open through January 19.

Museum Ludwig

Hein­rich-Böll-Platz, Cologne.

From top: Trajal Harrell, Dancer of the Year, 2019, Kunstenfestivaldesarts, Centre Pompidou, Brussels, © Trajal Harrell, photograph by Orpheas Emirzas; Oscar Murillo, Human Resources, 2016 (detail), installation view, Carlos/Ishikawa, London, courtesy and © Oscar Murillo and Carlos/Ishikawa; Jesse Darling, Virgin Variations (working title, detail), 2019, courtesy and © Jesse Darling; Paul Maheke, Seeking after the fully grown dancer *deep within*, 2016–19, courtesy and © Paul Maheke and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019, photograph by Henry Chan; Sondra Perry, Ecologue for [in]HABITABILITY, 2017–2019, installation view, Future Generation Art Prize, Venice, courtesy and © Sondra Perry, the Victor Pinchuk Foundation, and Bridget Donahue, New York; Flaka Haliti, What are they thinking that we thinking that they thinking we going to do next? #1, 2019 (draft), courtesy and © Flaka Haliti; Park McArthur, Polyurethane Foam, 2016, courtesy and © Park McArthur and Essex Street, New York and Lars Friedrich, Berlin. Below: Trajal Harrell. Images courtesy and © the artists, photographers, and institutions.

LUCAS BLALOCK — THE BUTTER AND THE MONEY FOR THE BUTTER

THE BUTTER AND THE MONEY FOR THE BUTTER is a new limited edition artwork by Lucas Blalock, produced on the occasion of the 2019 NY Art Book Fair.

The work is constructed of eight individual photographs printed on aluminum and bound with cloth to create a book-like sculptural object.

This Printed Matter Fundraising Edition is now available.

LUCAS BLALOCK—THE BUTTER AND THE MONEY FOR THE BUTTER (New York: Printed Matter, 2019).

Lucas Blalock, The Butter and the Money for the Butter. Images courtesy and © the artist and Printed Matter.

NY ART BOOK FAIR 2019

Printed Matter’s NY ART BOOK FAIR returns to MOMA PS1 this week.

Among the over 350 international exhibitors are Sébastien Girard, Ooga Booga, Sternberg Press, Chose Commune, Dale Zine, Mörel, Candor Arts, The Free Black Women’s Library, Noah Lyon, Phile Magazine, Hauser & Wirth Publishers, and Dancing Foxes Press.

NY ART BOOK FAIR 2019

Opening night: Thursday, September 19, from 6 pm to 9 pm.

Preview: Friday, September 20, from 11 am to 1 pm.

Public hours:

Friday, September 20, from 1 pm to 7 pm.

Saturday, September 21, from 11 am to 8 pm.

Sunday, September 22, from 11 am to 7 pm.

MOMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens.

Printed Matter is indebted to Shannon Michael Cane (1974-2017), Curator of Fairs and Editions, for his significant contributions to the NY and LA Art Book Fairs. His impact on the artists’ book community was immense. He is remembered with admiration and affection.

From top: Moyra Davey, Burn the Diaries, Dancing Foxes Press, co-published with MuMOK, Vienna, and ICA, Philadelphia; Queer Archive Work 2, 2019; Vasantha Yogananthan, Exile, Chose Commune; Nevena Aleksovski, Linger On, Zavod P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E.; Some Writers Can Give You Two Heartbeats, 2019, Black Chalk & Co.; Flint Magazine, issue 1; Variations on Cerulean Phthaloand Ice Blue, 2018, Emma Kohlmann; artwork by Rubanee, The Bettys; Barbara Jones-Hogu, Resist, Relate, Unite, 2018 monograph, Candor Arts; Phile magazine; Sébastien Girard, My Tv Girls, 2017; Sory Sanlé, Studio Volta Photo, 2018, editorial concept, design, and printing by Sébastien Girard, published by Yossi Milo Gallery and Tezeta; Sarah Mattes, Eye, Dale Zine; David Armstrong, Night and Day, Mörel Books; Alix Marie, Bleu, Mörel Books; Many of Them, vol. V, The Future of Fiction, Ooga Booga; Philip Guston, Nixon Drawings, 1971 & 1975, Hauser & Wirth Publishers; artwork by Noah Lyon. Images courtesy and © the artists, authors, photographers, and publishers.

ROBERT FRANK

There are too many pictures now. It’s overwhelming. A flood of images that passes by, and says, “Why should we remember anything?” There’s too much to remember now, too much to take in. — Robert Frank, 2004

He never crossed over into celebrity. He’s famous because he made a mark. He collected the world.Nan Goldin

Robert Frank—who was born in Switzerland but saw the United States with clearer eyes than any native—died yesterday in Inverness, Nova Scotia.

His book The Americans was published just over sixty years ago, and his films include Pull My Daisy (1959), Me and My Brother (1969), Cocksucker Blues (1972, Frank’s little-seen documentary of the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street tour), and Candy Mountain (1987, co-directed with Rudy Wurlitzer).

Top: Fred Stein, Robert Frank, 1954, Fred Stein Archive/Getty Images. Robert Frank, The Americans, from top: Los Angeles, 1956; Funeral, St. Helena, South Carolina, 1955; Drive-in movie, Detroit, 1955; Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, New York City, 1955; 14th Street White Tower, New York, 1948; New York City, 1955; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Detroit River Rouge Plant, 1955; Parade, Hoboken, New Jersey; The Americans cover image, Trolley, New Orleans, 1956, Steidl edition, 2008. Below: Robert Frank, Wellfleet, Massachusetts, 1962; Ronny Jacques, Robert Frank. Images courtesy and © Estate of Robert Frank, Pace-MacGill Gallery, Fotostiftung Schweiz, the portrait photographers, and the agencies.

ALVIN BALTROP

For [Alvin] Baltrop, who for a time lived in a van parked along New York City’s Hudson River, the waterfront was more like a second home. Looking at photographs of so many naked bodies sprawled out on the docks on a summer day, we might think we were witnessing the radical democratization of men. We can be sure that some of the waterfront pleasure seekers experienced it that way, but Baltrop was always keenly aware of the inequalities embedded in queer life and in the gay civil rights movement.Jonathan Weinberg, Pier Groups

“Although initially terrified of the piers, I began to take these photos as a voyeur [and] soon grew determined to preserve the frightening, mad, unbelievable, violent, and beautiful things that were going on at that time. To get certain shots, I hung from the ceilings of several warehouses utilizing a makeshift harness, watching and waiting for hours to record the lives that these people led (friends, acquaintances, and strangers), and the unfortunate ends that they sometimes met…

“The casual sex and nonchalant narcotizing, the creation of artwork and music, sunbathing, dancing, merrymaking, and the like habitually gave way to muggings, callous yet detached violence, rape, suicide, and, in some instances, murder. The rapid emergence and expansion of AIDS in the 1980s further reduced the number of people going to and living at the piers, and the sporadic joys that could be found there.” — Alvin Baltrop*

[Baltrop] photographed constantly at the Hudson River piers from 1975 to 1986, and the thousands of negatives from that project constitute his chief photographic legacy. He risked much to work there. In order to spend more time at the piers, he gave up his job as a taxi driver and became a self-employed mover. Often he stayed for days on end, living out of his moving van parked nearby. In spite of the remarkable documentary and aesthetic value of what he accomplished, Baltrop was almost completely unsuccessful at getting his work exhibited during his lifetime.Douglas Crimp

The Bronx Museum show THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALVIN BALTROP features over 200 photographs as well as the first public exhibition of Baltrop’s personal archive. The show was curated by Sergio Bessa, and a catalog is available from Skira.

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALVIN BALTROP

Through February 9, 2020.

Bronx Museum of the Arts

1040 Grand Concourse, The Bronx.

*Alvin Baltrop, manuscript for Ashes from a Flame: Photographs by Alvin Baltrop, edited by Randal Wilcox.

See Ed Halter on Baltrop.

Alvin Baltrop, from top: The Piers (Man Sitting and Smoking), circa1975–1986, gelatin silver print; The Piers (Collapsed Warehouse), circa 1975–1986; The Piers, circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Male Drinking with Cigarette), circa 1975-1986; The Piers, circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Man from Behind), 1977–1978, silver gelatin print; The Piers (exterior view of Day’s End), 1975-8; Pier 52 (Gordon Matta-Clark’s Day’s End), 1975–1986, silver gelatin print, Bronx Museum of the Arts permanent collection; The Piers (4), circa 1975–1986; The Piers (Open Window), circa 1975-86. Images courtesy and © the Alvin Baltrop Trust, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York, Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Third Streaming, New York.