Category Archives: PHOTOGRAPHY

MADAME D’ORA

Madame d’Ora—born Dora Kallmus in Vienna in 1881—was the first woman admitted into the Association of Austrian Photographers. Documenting the leading lights of Viennese culture and fashion—her first portrait was of Gustav Klimt—the Francophile lenswoman opened a studio in Paris in 1925, shooting Maurice Chevalier, Josephine Baker, and Gabrielle Chanel, among others.

When the Nazis overran the French capital in 1940, d’Ora fled to Ardèche, in the southeast. After the war—most of her family were murdered in the camps—she returned to Paris and began a series of portraits of displaced persons and Parisian slaughterhouses.

Madame d’Ora, fanned by the wing of genius, strolls in a labyrinth whose minotaur goes from the Dolly Sisters to the terrible bestiary of the slaughterhouses—where this ageless woman, more lucid than any young man, brushes the killers aside with a gesture and sets up her camera in their stead in front of the daily sacrifice of our carnivorous cult. — Jean Cocteau, 1958

MADAME D’ORA—the exhibition curently on view at the Neue Galerie in Manhattan—is the largest museum retrospective on the photographer to date in this country.

MADAME D’ORA

Through June 8.

Neue Galerie

1048 Fifth Avenue (at 86th Street), New York City.

Madame d’Ora, from top: Tamara de Lempicka, hat by Rose Descat, 1933; Josephine Baker, 1928, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Displaced persons camp in Austria, 1945; Tsuguharu Foujita; Colette, 1954, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Madame Agnès with a hat made of velvet with transparent brim, circa 1936, Photoinstitut Bonartes, Vienna; Helene Jamrich with a hat from Zwieback, designed by Rudolf Krieser, 1909, Photoinstitut Bonartes, Vienna; Alban Berg, 1909, Höhere Graphische Bundes-Lehr-und Versuchsanstalt, Vienna; Countess von Haugwitz-Széchényi, Countess Khevenhüller-Fürstenberg, and Countess Marie Choloniewska serving in the Red Cross during the First World War, 1914, Ullstein Bild collection; Elsie Altmann-Loos, 1922, photoarchive Setzer-Tschiedel / IMAGNO; Pablo Picasso, 1955, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Coco Chanel, 1923, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas in a costume by Pierre Balmain; Madame d’Ora self-portrait. Images courtesy and © the photographer’s estate and all agencies names above.

THE TIMES OF BILL CUNNINGHAM

I’m not talented. Wee Gee was a real photographer… I’m lightweight stuff… I think of myself as a fashion historian… [Street photographer] Harold Chapman was the biggest influence on me… He taught me to be invisible. “Stop waving that camera around like a fan,” was his expression… 

I’m strictly interested in the way women dress in their own lives. — Bill Cunningham*

Cunningham—New York City’s greatest postwar documentarian of street style—was incredibly self-deprecating, claiming that his New York Times colleagues dismissed his regular columns “On the Street” and “Evening Hours” as “filling around the edges of the ads.”

Arriving in New York in 1949 at age 19, Cunningham went to work as a milliner at Bonwit Teller and the high-end boutique Chez Ninon, where Jacqueline Kennedy and Babe Paley shopped for line-for-line copies of couture originals. While Ninon’s proprietors valued his contribution, they did their best to push him away from fashion and into “straight” journalism—above all keeping him away from Diana Vreeland, fearing the eccentric editor would irrevocably seduce/corrupt the impressionable young man.

(Of course, Cunningham and Vreeland eventually met, and the photographer went on to document nearly every show the doyenne of fashion staged at the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute.)

In the new documentary THE TIMES OF BILL CUNNINGHAM—directed by Mark Bozek, and constructed around a long on-camera interview he shot with the photographer in 1994—Cunningham tells his tale: making hats under the name “William J,” sharing a loft at the Carnegie Hall studios with Bobby Short, Marlon Brando, and Norman Mailer, decamping to Paris for the shows during his U.S. Army stint in Rochefort-sur-Mer.

In the early 1960s, Cunningham wrote a column for John Fairchild’s Womens Wear Daily, and in 1967 was given a small Olympus-Pen by David Montgomery, who worked with Antonio Lopez. A Cunningham street photo of Greta Garbo was published in the Times in 1978, and his career at the paper began.

The year of the film’s interview is key. 1994 was at the height of the AIDS epidemic, and several times during the second half of the film, Cunningham breaks down in anguish at the loss of loved ones, including Lopez and his partner Juan Ramos.

THE TIMES OF BILL CUNNINGHAM

Now playing.

Royal

11523 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

Playhouse 7

673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

Town Center 5

17200 Ventura Boulevard, Encino.

From top: Bill Cunningham in Paris in 1970, photograph by Jean Luce Hure. All other images by Cunningham: street views, New York (3); Grace Coddington, New York; Anna Piaggi; Josephine Baker, surrounded by models including Pat Cleveland and Bethann Hardison, at the “Battle of Versailles” fashion show, 1973; Kay Thompson, who choreographed Halston’s segment of the show; Diana Vreeland, New York, at the Costume Institute in the 1970s; André Leon Talley, Vreeland’s then-assistant, at the Costume Institute; Vreeland and Marisa Berenson; Sonny Bono, Cher, and Ahmet Ertegun (in glasses); Gloria Swanson, New York; Greta Garbo, New York; street scene, New York; Gay Pride Parade, New York, 1970s; Juan Ramos (left) and Antonio Lopez; James Kaliardos (second from left), Stephen Gan (second from right), and Cecelia Dean (right) in 1991, displaying issue #1 of Visionaire. Below, Cunningham in Paris. Images courtesy and © the estate of Bill Cunningham and Greenwich Entertainment.

DORA MAAR

DORA MAAR—the comprehensive retrospective of the great surrealist photographer, photomontage artist, and painter—is now on view at Tate Modern.

DORA MAAR is curated by Karolina Ziebinska-Lewandowska and Damarice Amao (curator and assistant curator, Centre Pompidou, Paris), and Amanda Maddox (associate curator, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles), with Emma Lewis (assistant Curator, Tate Modern).

DORA MAAR

Through March 15.

Tate Modern

Millbank, London.

Dora Maar, from top: Model Star, 1936, silver gelatin print, Thérond Collection; Untitled, 1935, silver gelatin print, formerly in the Christian Bouqueret Collection, Centre Pompidou, Paris; Still Life with Jar and Cup, 1945, oil on canvas, private collection; The years lie in wait for you, circa 1935, William Talbott Hillman Collection; 29 rue d’Astorg, circa 1936; Untitled (Hand-Shell), 1934; The Conversation, 1937, Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte, Madrid © FABA, photograph by Marc Domage; Woman Sitting in Profile, circa 1930, (tattoo patterns drawn on photograph), private collection; The Simulator, 1936, silver gelatin print printed on a carton, Centre Pompidou, Paris; Portrait of Picasso, Paris, Studio 29, rue d’Astorg, Winter, 1935, silver gelatin negative on flexible support in cellulose nitrate, Centre Pompidou; Model in Swimsuit, 1936, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Portrait of Ubu,1936, silver gelatin print, Centre Pompidou; Man looking inside a sidewalk inspection door, London, circa 1935, collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg, New York, courtesy art2art circulating exhibitions. Images courtesy and © Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Centre de création industrielle, Paris, MNAM-CCI, A. Laurans, P. Migeat, RMN-GP, ADAGP, Paris, 2019, DACS, London, 2019, and the estate of Dora Maar.


DENNIS MORRIS’ MARLEY

To mark Bob Marley’s seventy-fifth birthday, Gulla Jonsdottir presents an exhibition of photographs by Marley’s official documenteur, Dennis Morris.

DJ Smoking Vinyl will play at tonight’s opening reception.

PORTRAITS OF THE KING

Through February 16.

Gulla Jonsdottir Atelier

633 North La Peer Drive, West Hollywood.

Dennis Morris. All photographs courtesy and © the artist.

GIRLS LIKE US LAUNCH

Biography—the 12th issue of GIRLS LIKE US—features interviews with Amy Sillman and Marilyn Waring, a poem by Hanne Lippard, and articles, essays, and projects by Nadia Hebson, Jill Johnston, Rebecca E. Karl, Nina Lykke, Sara Manente, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Chris E. Vargas, and Amy Suo Wu, among others.

Join Jessica Gysel, Sara Kaaman, Katja Mater, and Marnie Slater for the issue’s launch in Rotterdam.

GIRLS LIKE US LAUNCH—BIOGRAPHY

Sunday, December 29, from 4 pm to 8 pm.

Tender Center

Zaagmolenstraat 127a, Rotterdam.

Girls Like Us, from top: “Biography” launch announcement, “More or less female” T-shirt by Everybody; “Second witch in a week!” T-shirt by Butchcamp; Girls Like Us issue 12 cover; “Titty Tote”; “The Lesbian Body” T-shirt, featuring excerpt from Monique Wittig’s text. Images courtesy and © the designers, the authors, the photographers, the models, and Girls Like Us.