Category Archives: PHOTOGRAPHY

STAN DOUGLAS AT THE HAMMER

“Jacques Derrida loved the word observe. He paid special attention to its root word, serve, which tied observation to respect, service, and deference. To observe something, he thought, was an act of humility. You gave yourself over to the details, gathering data and storing it in reserve for the future… *

Stan Douglas uses lens-based media to facilitate this kind of servitude to details. I mention Derrida not to overemphasize the theoretical structures at work in Douglas’ output (and there are many), but rather to point out that the production details Douglas wants viewers to notice in his work are many and fine, and require sustained concentration…. [His work] is an invitation to become curious: about the narratives that have brought Douglas’ subjects to his camera and to the viewer’s gaze; about the processes Douglas uses to make an image look the way it does; and about how his subjects have emerged from seemingly long-lost historical moments and ended up in his pictures.” — Katie Anania

This week, Stan Douglas will give the UCLA Department of Art Lecture at the Hammer.

STAN DOUGLAS talk

Thursday, April 25, at 7:30 pm.

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*See Jacques DerridaMemoirs of the Blind: The Self-Portrait and Other Ruins, translated by Pascale-Anne Brault and Michael Naas (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993), 23.

Stan Douglas, from top: Exodus, 1975, 2012, digital C-print mounted on aluminum; Malabar People series, Dancer, 1951, 2011, digital fiber print; The Secret Agent installation view, David Zwirner, New York, 2016, six-channel video installation, eight audio channels with six musical variations, color, sound, 53:35 minutes; Luanda-Kinshasa (2013, still, Jason Moran at left), single-channel video projection, color, sound, 6 hours, 1 minute; Abbott and Cordova, 7 August 1971, 2008, chromogenic print mounted on aluminum; Inconsolable Memories (2005, still), two synchronized asymmetrical film loop projections, 16 mm black-and-white film, sound, fifteen permutations with a common period of 5:39 minutes. Images © Stan Douglas and courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, and Victoria Miro.

PALIMPSEST

PALIMPSEST—an exhibition in Ireland about how temporal connections alter definitions of place—features the work of Nicole Eisenman, Zoe Leonard, Hilary Lloyd, Charlotte Prodger, Martine Syms, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, and Andrea Zittel.

Curated by Charlie Porter, the show will include a new text by Olivia Laing, author of the novel Crudo (2018), and The Trip to Echo Spring (2014), a memoir about writers and alcohol.

PALIMPSEST

Through October 13.

Lismore Castle Arts

Lismore, County Waterford.

From top: Charlotte Prodger, Sophie with Sheets 32015, inkjet print, stainless steel frame, glass, courtesy of the artist and Lismore Castle Arts; Martine Syms, Notes on Gesture (4), 2015, courtesy of the artist and Sadie Coles Gallery; Zoe LeonardUntitled, 2002, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.


LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

The paintings of Ben Shahn, Antonio Berni, Raquel Forner, Honoré Sharrer, and Pavel Tchelitchew, the photography of Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, the sculpture of Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, the ballet costumes of Kurt Seligmann, Paul Cadmus, and Jared French, the music of Virgil Thomson, and the philosophy of George Gurdjieff

… all come together in LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN, the Museum of Modern Art exhibition devoted to the writer, critic, curator, patron, and impresario who set the aesthetic template for MOMA and brought George Balanchine to America to establish the New York City Ballet.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

Through June 15.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

This summer MOMA‘s West 53rd Street location will close for four months—June 15 through October 21—for reconstruction.

From top: George Platt LynesLincoln Kirstein, circa 1948, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes; Paul Cadmus, set design for the ballet Filling Station, 1937, cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941, © 2018 estate of Paul Cadmus; Walker EvansRoadside View, Alabama Coal Area Town, 1936, gelatin silver print, printed circa 1969 by Charles RodemeyerMuseum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the artist, © 2019 Walker Evans Archive, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Paul CadmusBallet Positions, drawing for the primer Ballet Alphabet, 1939, ink, pencil, colored ink, and gouache on paper (letters reversed on drawing), Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein, © 2019 estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel TchelitchewHide-and-Seek. 1940–42, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Harvard Society for Contemporary Art pamphlet. 1931–32, Harvard Society for Contemporary Art scrapbooks, vol. 2 (Autumn 1930–33), Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York; Ben ShahnBartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco, 1931–32, gouache on paper on board, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of Ben Shahn / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Pavel Tchelitchew, study for a backdrop for the ballet Apollon Musagète, 1942, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein; George Platt LynesLew Christensen in Apollon Musagète, June 24, 1937, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes.


KRAFTWERK — DANCE FOREVER

The exhibition KRAFTWERK—DANCE FOREVER—drawn from the collection of Toby Mott—documents the visual side of the highly influential electronic ensemble.

On view this weekend at Arcana are the promotional materials, sheet music, obsolete recorded media, posters, photographs, and musical toys that so distinguished the German ensemble’s aesthetic values.

The evening will feature Kraftwerk-themed musical sets by Rose Knows and Sean Horton, and Kraftwerk shirts and bags designed by Alex McWhirter.

Copies of the nearly 100-page, limited-edition catalogue—signed by Mott, who is attending the event—will be available.

KRAFTWERK—DANCE FOREVER

Saturday, April 13, from 5 pm to 9 pm.

Arcana—Books on the Arts

8675 Washington Boulevard, Culver City.

From top: Kraftwerk, materials designed by Toby Mott (2); Kraftwerk. Images courtesy the artists and Arcana Books.

L.A. ART BOOK FAIR

DoPe Press is extremely happy to see the return of the Printed Matter–LA Art Book Fair to the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. We will be in section H07 on the main level.

Our newest publications—the journal PARIS LA 16: “The Fashion and Writing Issue” and the artist’s book …my life in the sunshine—Liz Craft 2006–2017—will be available, as well as our back catalogue and a selection of out-of-print titles.

For art and fashion lovers: In 2013 the artist Max Hooper Schneider created a silk scarf edition with P.P.M. Studio, Milan. We are offering the edition for purchase, as well as his last available original artwork from this series—dense, hand-drawn graphic lines recalling imaginative worlds and biologies—which will be part of a forthcoming book published by DoPe Press in September 2019.

In addition, we have invited some friends and family from Paris to share their publications and journals: Paraguay Press, MAY, and Profane.

PRINTED MATTER—L.A. ART BOOK FAIR 2019

Opening night, April 11, from 6 pm to 9 pm.

Friday, April 12, from 1 pm to 7 pm.

Saturday, April 13, from 11 am to 7 pm.

Sunday, April 14, from 11 am to 6 pm.

Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Cassi Namoda, Love and compromise between a clock and hyena, 2018, from “Selected Paintings,” PARIS LA 16; Liz Craft, …my life in the sunshine–Liz Craft 2006-2017 page layout; image from PARIS LA 16, drawing of Lotta Volkova by Cédric Rivrain, 2018; image from PARIS LA 14, photograph of Elizabeth Schmitt Jennerjahn and Robert Rauschenberg at Black Mountain College by Hazel Larsen Archer; image from Alex Hubbard, Eat Your Friends (DoPe Press, 2015); Max Hooper Schneider, silk scarf edition for P.P.M. Studio, 2013, photograph by Nuage Lepage, 2019; image from PARIS LA 14, Juliana Huxtable, Sympathy for the Martyr, 2015; image from Oscar Tuazon, Live (DoPe Press and Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014); cover image, Pentti Monkkonen, Box Truck Paintings (DoPe Press, 2014); PARIS LA 16 inside covers, Michèle Lamy, photograph by Katerina Jebb, 2018.