Category Archives: VIDEO

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

At LACMA this weekend, join Charles Gaines, writers and scholars Jennifer González, Shelleen Greene, Ariel Osterweis, B. Ruby Rich, Jeffrey Stewart, and Sarah Thornton, curator Mark Nash, and LACMA‘s Naima J. Keith and Christine Y. Kim for a daylong symposium of screenings and panel discussions celebrating the work of Isaac Julien—who will be in attendance.

Among the complete works to be presented are PLAYTIME, LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS, WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS, and a 30th anniversary screening of LOOKING FOR LANGSTON, Julien’s film about Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes.

Excerpts from KAPITAL and TEN THOUSAND WAVES will also be shown.

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, May 18, from 9 am to 5 pm.

ISAAC JULIEN—PLAYTIME

Through August 11.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Full schedule of screenings and speakers:

9:00 am — Coffee and pastries.

9:25 am — Welcome and introductions by Christine Y. Kim, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, LACMA.

9:30 am — PLAYTIME (2014). Sarah Thornton.

9:50 am — KAPITAL (2013), excerpt. Charles Gaines and Mark Nash.

10:50 am — WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS (2007). Jennifer González and Shelleen Greene.

12:00 pm — TEN THOUSAND WAVES (2010) (excerpt). Jeffrey Stewart and Ariel Osterweis, with Christine Y. Kim.

1:10 pm to 1:55 pm — Lunch will be provided for participants.

2:00 pm — LOOKING FOR LANGSTON (1989). B. Ruby Rich and Isaac Julien

3:35 pm — LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS (2019). Isaac Julienand Jeffrey Stewart, with Naima J. Keith

Isaac Julien, from top: Emerald City / Capital (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 2013 (2); The Abyss (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Metro Pictures, 2013, photograph by Genevieve Hanson; All that’s solid melts into air (Playtime), 2013; Ten Thousand Waves, 2010, 35mm film, transferred to HD 9.2 surround sound; Icarus descending (Playtime), 2013; Isaac Julien, Eclipse (Playtime), 2013. Black and white photograph of Isaac Julien, 2017, by Thierry Bal. All works and images courtesy and © Isaac Julien, the photographers, Victoria Miro, London, and Metro Pictures, New York.

JOHN KELLY AT REDCAT

“Songs are like tattoos,” wrote Joni Mitchell, echoing the pain of their creation. For the composer, songs often outlive the love that inspired them. For the rest of us, they’re emblems of the faces and places they evoke and the times they define.

John Kelly—visual and performance artist, writer, choreographer, and Mitchell interpreter nonpareil—brings his new, highly subjective work TIME NO LINE to Los Angeles for a three-night stand at Redcat.

Based on journal entries spanning forty years, TIME NO LINE bridges the decades with movement, music, and art. As an on-the-ground witness to the initial devastation of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s and the culture wars of the 1990s, Kelly is an artist-activist of rare insight and experience, and this engagement is not to be missed.

“The spoken word was the last thing I cared to add to my arsenal as a performer… [Journal writing is a] habit that has accumulated and become a significant body of work, a source of both insanely good raw material and embarrassment and remorse. It’s tough to read back through this stuff.” — John Kelly

On opening night, Kelly will join writer and professor David Román for a post-performance talk.*

JOHN KELLY—TIME NO LINE

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, April 25, 26, and 27.

All shows at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*David Román is the author of Acts of Intervention: Performance, Gay Culture, and AIDS and co-editor—with Holly Hughes—of O Solo Homo: The New Queer Performance.

Joni Mitchell, “Blue,” © 1971, Joni Mitchell Music, Inc. (BMI).

John Kelly, Time No Line performance photographs, from top: Paula Court; John Kelly‘s Instagram; Theo Cote; Court. Images courtesy of John Kelly and the photographers.

John Kelly (above) at Sideways into the Shadows, his portrait series of lovers, friends, and colleagues lost to the AIDS epidemic, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, 2018. Photograph by Susan Rand Brown, courtesy of John Kelly and the photographer.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

The paintings of Ben Shahn, Antonio Berni, Raquel Forner, Honoré Sharrer, and Pavel Tchelitchew, the photography of Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, the sculpture of Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, the ballet costumes of Kurt Seligmann, Paul Cadmus, and Jared French, the music of Virgil Thomson, and the philosophy of George Gurdjieff

… all come together in LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN, the Museum of Modern Art exhibition devoted to the writer, critic, curator, patron, and impresario who set the aesthetic template for MOMA and brought George Balanchine to America to establish the New York City Ballet.

LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN

Through June 15.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

This summer MOMA‘s West 53rd Street location will close for four months—June 15 through October 21—for reconstruction.

From top: George Platt LynesLincoln Kirstein, circa 1948, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes; Paul Cadmus, set design for the ballet Filling Station, 1937, cut-and-pasted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lincoln Kirstein, 1941, © 2018 estate of Paul Cadmus; Walker EvansRoadside View, Alabama Coal Area Town, 1936, gelatin silver print, printed circa 1969 by Charles RodemeyerMuseum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the artist, © 2019 Walker Evans Archive, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Paul CadmusBallet Positions, drawing for the primer Ballet Alphabet, 1939, ink, pencil, colored ink, and gouache on paper (letters reversed on drawing), Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein, © 2019 estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel TchelitchewHide-and-Seek. 1940–42, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Harvard Society for Contemporary Art pamphlet. 1931–32, Harvard Society for Contemporary Art scrapbooks, vol. 2 (Autumn 1930–33), Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York; Ben ShahnBartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco, 1931–32, gouache on paper on board, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of Ben Shahn / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Pavel Tchelitchew, study for a backdrop for the ballet Apollon Musagète, 1942, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Kirstein; George Platt LynesLew Christensen in Apollon Musagète, June 24, 1937, gelatin silver print, Museum of Modern Art, New York, © 2019 estate of George Platt Lynes.


CIRCUS OF BOOKS AT FIERMAN

“Growing up, I always assumed every store had an over-18 section. It was only when I got older that I realized my parents were in the business of hardcore gay porn. This was a completely strange thing for me, because this was not the world I knew to be of my parents: straight-laced, boring, and in my mom’s case, religious. The world of sexual deviants, gender nonconforming transgressives and weirdos, that was my world, not theirs…

“And yet, it took me leaving Los Angeles for over a decade to fully comprehend what a massive role their two Circus of Books stores served for the community. It took making a documentary film to realize that they had nurtured a second family to the family they had at home. They had carved out their own special place as trusted shop owners who never judged anyone who showed up in their surreptitious aisles, even as the rest of the world cast down condemnation, to say nothing of other parents at our school. As the store was closing last week, a Vietnam veteran walked through the doors and stood, unmoving in front of the register. My mom had protested against Vietnam, and she proceeded to tell him how terrible the Vietnam War was, and he looked at her and said, ‘Thank you. This store is part of my history, and some of the best years of my life happened here.’ ” — Rachel Mason, producer and director, Circus of Books*

The original Circus of Books—called “Book Circus”—opened in West Hollywood in 1967, followed by the Silver Lake location at Sunset Junction. An exhibition celebrating the communal culture and backrooms of Karen and Barry Mason‘s adults-only emporiums—fifty years of getting off—is now on view in Manhattan.

The show—curated by David Fierman with Rachel Mason—features artwork by Wilder Alison, Ron Athey, Adam Baran, Bengala, Erik Bergrin, Michael Bilsborough, Raynes Birkbeck, Seth Bogart, Chris Bogia, Kathe Burkhart, Deric Carner, Chivas Clem, Scott Covert, Vaginal Davis, Anne Doran, Thomas Dozol, Zackary Drucker, Ruben Esparza, Tom of Finland, Karen Finley, Benjamin Fredrickson, ektor garcia, Mariah Garnett, Mark Golamco, Jeff Grant, Michelle Handelman, Charles Hovland, Scott Hug, David Hurles, Stephen Irwin, William E. Jones, Wayne Koestenbaum, Mike Kuchar, Bruce LaBruce, Dawn Mellor, Lucas Michael, Billy Miller, Bob Mizer, David Mramor, Narcissister, Dominic Nurre, Mel Ottenberg, Jack Pierson, Breyer P-Orridge, Pre-Echo Press, Fay Ray, Mariah Robertson, Dean Sameshima, Stuart Sandford, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Margie Schnibbe, Michael Stipe, Chris E. Vargas, Mark Verabioff, Jan Wandrag, Karlheinz Weinberger, Jimmy Wright, and Dorian Wood.

CIRCUS OF BOOKS*

Through May 6.

Fierman

127 Henry Street, New York City.

From top: Vaginal Davis, Ascyltos of the Satyricon, 2016, ink on paper; Dominic Nurre, Vale of Cashmere Head, 2017–19, coconut shell, coconut oil, salt lick, and acrylic; David Mramor, Pink Star, 2019, oil, acrylic, and inkjet on canvas; Wayne Koestenbaum, David at Leisure, 2019, oil and graphite on canvas paper; Lucas Michael, G5CR, 2017, neon; Dawn Mellor, Southend Beach, 2013, oil, Tipp-ex, and marker pen on linen; Jimmy Wright, Griffith Park, LA, 1973, graphite and charcoal on graph paper; Seth Bogart, Faggots, 2019, ceramic; Mike Kuchar, Liquid Dreams, circa 1980s–1990s, pencil, pens, felt pens, and ink on paper; Scott Hug, Untitled (STH_PW_003), 2018, collage; Jeff Grant, Snow and Holes, 2018, archival inkjet print, staples, and clearlay; Karen Finley, dickless, 2018, ink on paper. Images courtesy the artists and Fierman gallery. Special thanks to David Fierman and Rachel Mason.

CYPRIEN GAILLARD

CYPRIEN GAILLARD—ROOTS CANAL is an exhibition of the films, photographs, and sculptures by the artist—mostly from the last five years—that “describe and evoke the perpetual destruction, preservation, and reconstruction of [our] urban spaces.”*

The show includes Gaillard’s excavator heads—on view in Europe for the first time—and the Sober City Polaroid series.

CYPRIEN GAILLARD—ROOTS CANAL*

Through May 5.

Museum Tinguely

Paul Sacher-Anlage 2, Basel.

From top: Cyprien Gaillard, Sober City (Jackie Robinson & Pee Wee Reese), 2015 (detail); Cyprien Gaillard, Nightlife, 2015 (still); Cyprien Gaillard, King Island Stubtail, 2013; Cyprien Gaillard, Nightlife, 2015 (still); Cyprien GaillardKOE, 2015 (still). Images © Cyprien Gaillard, courtesy the artist, Sprüth Magers, and Gladstone Gallery.