Category Archives: VIDEO

FELIX BERNSTEIN AND GABE RUBIN

THE TOTAL VOMITORIUM—an exhibition by Felix Bernstein and Gabe Rubin featuring the durational 4-channel video Vomitorium 720°—is now on view in Luma Westbau’s Schwarzescafé.

(An earlier iteration of Vomitorium—closed at the start of the pandemic—was at Queenslab, The Kitchen’s partner venue in Ridgewood, New York.)

Organized by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen, the show is atragicomic reenactment of the history of meta-theater from religious ritual to live-streaming, Zoom, and Twitch.  The artists transition between multiple genres, genders, ages, tropes, eras, and personae, with Bernstein playing Onkos, the Greek mask of tragedy, and Rubin playing multiple versions of Eros. They play-through arcane and new modes of performance documentation from Classical diagrams to Victorian photo journals, as well as the parallel domestication of Eros into Cupid.”*

The vomitorium is traced from its origin as a passageway in amphitheaters to the current socially reflexive architecture built for Instagram selfie-stories—comparing the way audiences watch each other watching each other binging and purging media. The impossible wish for a 360-degree perspective is shown to mark both panoptic social media and counter-surveillance tactics; normative and queer gazes. Played on four unconnected screens, Vomitorium is inlaid by Baroque frames—juxtaposing maximalist convolution with the fashionable metaphysics of presence and transparency. Virtually real versions of Vomitorium will be simultaneously made available on the new media app Ortvi.*

FELIX BERNSTEIN and GABE RUBIN—THE TOTAL VOMITORIUM*

Through September 6.

Luma Westbau—Schwarzescafé

Löwenbräukunst, Limmatstrasse 270, Zürich.

Felix Bernstein and Gabe Rubin, The Total Vomitorium, Luma Westbau, Schwarzescafé, June 9, 2020–September 6, 2020, photographs by Nelly Rodriguez, images courtesy and © the artists and David Lewis, New York.

TACITA DEAN AT EMMA

A retrospective of work by Tacita Dean is on view at EMMA in Finland through this weekend.

TACITA DEAN

Through August 2.

Espoo Museum of Modern Art

Ahertajantie 5, Tapiola, Espoo.

Tacita Dean, Espoo Museum of Modern Art, February 26, 2020–August 2, 2020, from top: Quatemary, 2014 (detail), photographs, photogravure in ten parts on Somerset White Satin; Stephen Dillane in Event for a Stage, 2015 (2); Veteran Cloud, 2016; The Book End of Time, 2013, black and white photograph on fiber-based paper; His Picture in Little, 2017, film still, 35mm color anamorphic film, silent, reduced to spherical 16mm for EMMA exhibition as a miniature, continuous loop, 15 minutes 30 seconds; Ear on a Worm, 2017, film still, 16mm color film with optical sound, continuous loop, 3 minutes 33 seconds; Chalk Fall, 2018, chalk on blackboard; Pantone Pairs, 2019 (detail), found postcards from the artist’s collection, printed and framed according to the artist’s instructions; Dillane in Event for a Stage; Quatemary, 2014 (detail), photographs, photogravure in ten parts on Somerset White Satin (detail). Images courtesy and © the artist, Frith Street Gallery, and Marian Goodman Gallery.

HELMUT NEWTON — THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL

It’s great to be a provocateur. That’s what the world needs, this provocation. It stimulates thought and it stimulates ideas. It stimulates all kinds of conversations that don’t really have anything to do with the man himself. And who cares about the man himself? We’re looking at his art. — Charlotte Rampling

He was a little bit pervert, but so am I so it’s okay. — Grace Jones

I do consider myself a feminist, but I do consider the expression of machismo as an expression of a culture. Now, of course, Helmet wasn’t simply macho—it was more complicated than that—but he does look at a woman as a sexual object, and also an attraction and an anger toward herIt was actually extraordinary that Helmut was accepted by the industry because he was much more dangerous—much more ambiguous and frightening—than an Avedon or a Penn… Helmut photographed women the way Leni Riefenstahl photographed men. Isabella Rossellini

Susan Sontag: As a woman, I find your photos very misogynist. For me it’s very unpleasant.

Bernard Pivot: You find him unpleasant?

Sontag: Yes. Not the man, the work… I never thought the man would look like the work. To the contrary. Even if you live through your work, you can be nice. I don’t expect a person to look like their work. Especially when it’s about fantasies and dreams.

Helmut Newton: I love women. There is nothing I love more.

Sontag: A lot of misogynist men say that. I am not impressed.

Newton: I swear—

Sontag: I’m sorry, I don’t think this is the truth. There’s an objective truth. The master adores his slave. The executioner loves his victim. A lot of misogynist men say they love women, but show them in a humiliating way.

Helmut actually loved strong women. — Nadja Auermann

When you’re 20 years old, 1.80 meters tall with blonde hair, you feel like a hunted deer. And Helmut Newton’s pictures made me stronger. I controlled the situation. I wasn’t the deer. I was equal to the hunter. I could decide what to do. I think a lot of people misunderstood that. — Sylvia Gobbel

I was very shy; I’d just turned 17. There was never a moment where I felt uncomfortable. I was just an amazing experience where I walked away saying, “This man is incredible.” He had a sort of twinkle in his eye—nothing serious, everything understated and very witty… Definitely, when I look at the pictures, it’s not me. It’s his imagination… I love the fact that I can be this different, through his lens.— Claudia Schiffer

I think he was Weimar. That’s how I think of him—connected to Brecht and Weill and George Grosz, that wonderful period of German Expressionism—that was Helmut. — Marianne Faithfull

Berlin for him was the very best of the Weimar Republic. Everything is possible, everything is allowed… What he liked about me was my guttersnipe style. I was not the usual elegant glamorous woman, but rather I had a portion of originality that comes from the lower classes of society. I suppose he also really like the eroticism of maids… It’s related to this Berlin period. — Hanna Schygulla

I loved my parents, they were great—very different influence on me. My mother was a very spoiled woman and quite hysterical in many ways, but pretty wonderful. And she encouraged me very much to become a photographer. My father was horrified by the idea. “You take pictures on the weekend for a hobby, my boy. You’ll end up in the gutter, my boy.” He was right, I did. But I had a good time in the gutter. — Helmut Newton*

The aesthetic of Helmut Newton—whose era is more distant from us now than the inspirational Weimar years were to Newton’s 1970s heyday—still provokes and intrigues, even in our less frivolous times.

In the excellent new documentary feature HELMUT NEWTON—THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL—now streaming on Kino Lorber’s Kino Marquee—filmmaker Gero von Boehm captures the great photographer’s obsession with the female form pushed to the edge of submission or absolute triumph.

HELMUT NEWTON—THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL

Laemmle, Los Angeles.

Lumiere Cinema at the Music Hall, Los Angeles.

*Quotations and dialog from Gero von Boehm, Helmut Newton—The Bad and the Beautiful, courtesy of the filmmaker, Kino Lorber, and Nadja Auermann, Marianne Faithfull, Sylvia Gobbel, Grace Jones, Charlotte Rampling, Isabella Rossellini, Claudia Schiffer, and Hanna Schygulla. Susan Sontag segment originally from Apostrophes, 1979.

Helmut Newton, from top: Grace Jones and Dolph Lundgren, Los Angeles, 1985; Gero von Boehm, Helmut Newton—The Bad and the Beautiful (2020), still, Grace Jones; Grace Jones; Helmut Newton—The Bad and the Beautiful, still, Isabella Rossellini; David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini, Los Angeles, 1988; Faye Dunaway, 1987, Vanity Fair cover shoot; Charlotte Rampling, Arles, 1973; Paloma Picasso, St. Tropez, 1973; Elsa Peretti in Halston Bunny Costume, 1975; Newton in Berlin in the 1930s (2), shortly before leaving Germany; A Cure for a Black Eye, Jerry Hall, 1974; Alice Springs and Newton, Us and Them (Helmut and June Newton). Images courtesy and © the Helmut Newton Foundation, June Newton, Gero von Boehm, Lupa Film, and Kino Lorber.

CARMEN ARGOTE — FILM PREMIERE AND EDITION LAUNCH

The Hammer Museum and Clockshop present the livestream premiere of Carmen Argote’s new short film LAST LIGHT, followed by a Q & A with the artist and the museum’s associate curator Erin Christovale.

Shot during the first wave of the pandemic, LAST LIGHT is a meditation on walking and memory in Los Angeles. Argote describes her walking habit as synonymous with thinking, a way of taking in and digesting the conditions of her environment. Through walking, the artist “deconstructs and reconstructs my ideas, thoughts, and self.” Combining video and still images of an evacuated city with an intimate voice-over, the narrator reflects on feelings of vulnerability and betrayal, and draws on childhood memories to make sense of a city transformed. Over the course of the piece, day moves to night as the artist traces a path from demolition and sickness to envisioning a different world.*

Also this week, the artist will launch her limited edition print BLOAT—a LACE edition guided by artist and printmaker Eric Gero—and join a conversation with LACE chief curator and director of programming Daniela Lieja Quintanar.

See links below for details.

CARMEN ARGOTE—LAST LIGHT*

Tuesday, July 21.

6 pm on the West Coast; 9 pm East Coast.

CARMEN ARGOTE—LACE EDITION LAUNCH and CONVERSATION

Wednesday, July 22.

7 pm on the West Coast; 10 pm East Coast.

Carmen Argote, Last Light (2020), images courtesy and © the artist.

RACHEL ROSE

Five video installations and a series of sculptures comprise Rachel Rose’s first comprehensive Paris exhibition, now on view at Lafayette Participations.

The artist’s LAKE VALLEY can also be seen online at the Carnegie Museum of Art. See links below for details.

RACHEL ROSE

Through September 13.

Lafayette Anticipations

9 rue du Plâtre, 4th, Paris.

RACHEL ROSE—LAKE VALLEY

Through August 16.

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh.

Rachel Rose,Lafayette Anticipations, March 13, 2020–September 13, 2020, from top: Exhibition views (2); Sitting, Feeding, Sleeping, 2013, HD video; Autoscopic Egg, 2017, resin egg and HD video; installation views of Lake Valley, 2016 (2); exhibition view; Rachel Rose (2020), edited by Guillaume Houzé, Rebecca Lamarche-Vadel, and Moritz Wesseler, cover image courtesy and © the artist, Fridericianum, Kassel, and Lafayette Participations, Paris; Rachel Rose, photograph by Landon Nordeman; Autoscopic Egg, detail; Born, 2019, rock and glass. Artwork and exhibition photographs by Lance Brewer and Andrea Rossetti, images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, Lafayette Participations, Pilar Corrias Gallery, London, and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York and Rome. (Note: Brown closed his galleries in July 2020 to partner with Gladstone Gallery, which now represents Rose.)