Category Archives: VIDEO

LIGIA LEWIS — DEADER THAN DEAD

Maybe within the museum dance can have another rhythm, temporality, be made more elusive. Dance could then escape the heavily prescribed regime often found in theaters, with concise beginnings and ends and a required length. Here then it could even be made “ghostly.”

Even then, I can attest to my general feelings of unease with the weight of History and the collecting of objects within the museological frame. This unease also bears on questions of site/sight as it pertains to the museum as space for viewing dance and performance. I have become increasingly more comfortable and, let’s say, provoked by the role of seeing and being seen by an audience. This relation to an audience is crucial and in large part where the resistance lies in my work. — Ligia Lewis*

As the Hammer Museum, the Huntington, and an art-starved public wait for the chance to experience Made in L.A. 2020: a version in person, artist and choreographer Ligia Lewis has created a video documenting deader than dead, her work for the biennial.

Performed by Jasper Marsalis, Jasmine Orpilla, Austyn Rich, and Lewis, deader than dead “began with an intrigue-based inquiry into deadpan, an impassive mannerism deployed in comedic fashion in order to illustrate emotional distance. Utilizing this expression as a type of stasis, Lewis initially developed a choreography for ten dancers that remained expressively flat or dead, resisting any narrative or representational hold tied to a climactic build or progression. Lewis had relegated deader than dead to this corner of the gallery (a kind of ‘dead’ space) where the dance would ostensibly emerge, although deadened in its repetition, limited in its fate, as it ricocheted from wall to wall.

“[Lewis] abandoned this recursive ensemble of death due to COVID-19, reducing the cast to four performers and pivoting to a more traditionally theatrical presentation. In this new work the dancers use Macbeth’s culminating soliloquy (‘Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,’ a reflection on repetition and meaninglessness) as the beginning of a work that unfolds in modular parts, each one an illustration or parody of death, stasis, and the void, each one tied to its own carefully selected soundtrack or sample.”**

See link below to watch the video.

LIGIA LEWIS—DEADER THAN DEAD**

Made in L.A.: a version

Hammer Museum and the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Gardens

Through March 2021.

*“Ligia Lewis and Ikechukwu Onyewuenyi in Conversation,” in Made in L.A. 2020: a version (Los Angeles: Hammer Museum; Munich: DelMonico-Prestel, 2020).

Ligia Lewis, deader than dead (2020), Made in L.A. 2020: a version. Video images © Ligia Lewis, courtesy of the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles and Seoul.

PUPPIES PUPPIES PERFORMANCE

In conjunction with the exhibition NOT I—THROWING VOICES (1500 BCE–2020 CE), LACMA presents a new video, installation, and performance work by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo): Performance–Trans, Transfeminine, Femme, Trans Womxn, Trans Women, Gender Non-Conforming, Non-Binary, Genderqueer, and Two-Spirit people (Dedicated to Camila María Concepción—Rest In Peace).

In addition to the artist, the performance features Jerome AB, Cielo Oscuro, Bamby Salcedo, Davia Spain, and Bri Williams. See link below for viewing information about this online event.

PUPPIES PUPPIES PERFORMANCE

LACMA

Thursday, November 12, at 5 pm (PST) through Sunday, November 15, at 1 pm (PST).

Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), from top: Realistic Androids for Hospitals in Japan (audio “Kanzi the Ape Speaking Through a Lexigram Keyboard”), 2020, digital video with sound, courtesy of the artist, commissioned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Anxiety, Depression & Triggers, Balice Hertling, June 6, 2019–July 20, 2019, installation views (3). Images © Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), courtesy of the artist, LACMA, and Balice Hertling.

DIANA THATER — YES, THERE WILL BE SINGING

From the beginning, I never wanted to work with just Bill Viola-style hidden projectors projecting on to screens. I wanted to work with architecture and with corners and doorways and windows. A lot of Robert Morris’ writing was important to me – still is. He talks about presence, about presence in the work of art and about being present, and that’s been really influential for me. — Diana Thater

YES, THERE WILL BE SINGING—a new sound, video, and light piece by Thater—is on view now, presented by David Zwirner Offsite. See link below.

DIANA THATER—YES, THERE WILL BE SINGING

David Zwirner Offsite

Through November 28.

Diane Thater, Yes, There Will Be Singing, David Zwirner Offsite, October 14, 2020–November 28, 2020. Images © Diana Thater, courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

CÉCILE B. EVANS — GISELLE

Cécile B. Evans presents her “experimental ecofeminist thriller” A Screen Test for an Adaptation of Giselle and a related performance work—Notations for an Adaptation of Giselle (welcome to whatever forever)—in Paris, through the first week of November. The works are part of the Move 2020 festival at Centre Pompidou.

Both A Screen Test—which combines digital footage, 16mm, VHS recordings, animation and AI—and the live Notations performances feature Alexandrina Hemsley as Giselle, Rebecca Root as Bertie, and Lily McMenamy as Leonida.

See link below for schedule.

CÉCILE B. EVANS—INSTALLATION AND PERFORMANCES

Through November 7.

Centre Pompidou

Place Georges-Pompidou.

Temporary entrance on rue Beaubourg and rue Saint-Merri, 4th, Paris.

Cécile B. Evans, A Screen Test for an Adaptation of Giselle (2019). Images © Cécile B. Evans, courtesy of the artist, Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna, and Château Shatto, Los Angeles.

KLARA LIDEN — TURN ME ON

The city that never gets any sleep. Turn me on. Ever since Edison invented the lightbulb, big cities everywhere have been associated with lights, with sky-lines glittering far off in the distance, city lights like eyes in the night, wires cables network solutions and all kinds of pollutions to keep the whole thing going. Stank you smelly much. If they can’t make it there, they can’t make it anywhere.

All artists’ works are said to be self-portraits whether figurative or abstract or bearing any kind of likeness whatsoever to their subject and what with Klara Liden performing repetitive, minimal, and what often looks like physically quite exhaustive tasks in her own videos. I mean, it’s her alright but then performing as a kind of extra, body double or stand-in. Social climbing, it’s a lonely thing. From rags to riches and back again. Likewise oftentimes bringing attention to what’s maybe some of society’s less spot-lit sides, its non-sites and service entrances off the beaten track beneath the arches hidden in plain view not necessarily meant to be looked at. Streaming like was I dreaming pinch me punch me bring it on again to where the streets have no names and anyone’s up for anything really. Achtung baby. Human kindness is overflowing. Check the radar change the channel. Life’s a beach and then you get old, do I dare to wear my trousers rolled!!? Come on and on one and many, come true it’s up to you. Rhythm to the rhythm. You know what, just never turn me off. — Karl Holmqvist*

A new show of Liden’s sculpture and video work is on view in London. See link below.

KLARA LIDEN—TURN ME ON*

Through October 31.

Sadie Coles HQ

1 Davies Street, Mayfair, London.

Klara Liden, Turn Me On, Sadie Coles HQ, September 3, 2020–October 31, 2020, installation photographs by Robert Glowacki. Images courtesy and © the artists and Sadie Coles HQ.