Category Archives: WEB/TELEVISION/RADIO

UGO RONDININE — MATTITUCK

Finding myself in an empty studio for the last three months, I resorted to an intimate work: drawing poems and brushing sunsets and moonrise paintings. This is a good time for me to work in silence—cocooning myself into my own time, these two pastimes I love most and tire of least. 

The Mattituck paintings show the view from my studio window across the Long Island Sound. My first summer in Mattituck was a revelation, forcing me to examine my surroundings with the freshness of a friendly alien. Every day, just when the twilight started, John [Giorno] and I would set our chairs in position and experience a new sunset, a magical illumination of the ordinary—lucid and lyrical. Looking at the sunset makes one feel that the physical and the spiritual are not separate. Like a diarist, I record the living universe: this season, this day, this hour, this sound in the grass, this crashing wave, this sunset, this end of the day, this silence.

In the middle of the AIDS crisis in 1989, I turned away from grief and found in nature a spiritual road map for solace, regeneration, and inspiration. In nature, you enter a space where the sacred and profane, the mystical and the mundane, vibrate against one another.

There is not much to say about this new group of paintings. They exist to be looked at—to let go of words and look at what is in front of our eyes. An artist is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with the visual. — Ugo Rondinone, May 2020

UGO RONDINONE—MATTITUCK

Viewing room through June 26.

Gladstone Gallery

Ugo Rondinone, Mattituck, Gladstone Gallery, May 29, 2020–June 20, 2020, watercolors on canvas in artist’s frame, from top: aprilfifthtwothousandandtwenty, 2020; decembereleventhtwothousandandnineteen, 2019; novemberthirdtwothousandandnineteen, 2019; octobereighthtwothousandandnineteen, 2019; septembertwentythirdtwothousandandnineteen, 2019; junetwentyfirsttwothousandandnineteen, 2019. Images and text courtesy and © the artist and Gladstone Gallery.

ADAM PENDLETON AND YVONNE RAINER

This week, Adam Pendleton and Performa present an online screening of the artist’s work JUST BACK FROM LOS ANGELES—A PORTRAIT OF YVONNE RAINER as well as a conversation with Pendleton and Performa founder RoseLee Goldberg. See links below for details.

They’re beginning to see what they used to only look at…

I remember the breathlessness of the lifting section

I remember your Martha Graham story and your voice rising, and I got worried you were going to talk about whether she ate cock or not and Steve starting to read on the other mic and changing the atmosphere.

I remember the opening bars of the Chambers Brothers and doing Trio A slow, very slow, and Steve joining me and then fast, with and against Steve’s tempo.

I remember… you grinning at the pleasure we had.

Oh, and the wings.

I remember watching the pillow solo and then during Trio A the wings would sometimes flap in my face.

I remember talking to you in the hotel, before “stoned,” and you said I was always wanting to get someplace and that I should just be where I was…

and only there… and that was what happened in the performance.

I remember standing around waiting to start the run-thru, and you were talking and then you turned and said, “What are you waiting for?”

and Doug saying what I had been doing, which was waiting for you!

I remember the pleasure of huddling in the rolls and Steve coming down on me with his self-conscious silly grin.

And I remember being out of it thru Becky’s solo, then toward the end seeing her so totally there with that changed and changing body of hers…

I remember the box improvisation with David.

The specter of crisis was also bolstered by the cops’ simple inability to stop killing black people. Just prior to Brown’s murder, forty-six-year-old Eric Garner of State Island, New York, unarmed and minding his own business, was approached by police and then choked to death as he gasped eleven times, “I can’t breathe.” Two days after Brown was killed, Los Angeles Police department officers shot and killed another young black man, Ezell Ford. Months later, autopsy reports would confirm that Ford was shot multiple times, including once in the back, while he lay on the ground. In a suburb of Dayton, Ohio, police shot to death John Crawford III, twenty-two years old and African American, while he was talking on his cell phone and holding an air gun on sale in the aisle of a Walmart. And as the nation waited to hear whether a grand jury would indict officer Darren Wilson for Brown’s death, Cleveland police killed thirty-seven-year-old, African American Tanisha Anderson when they slammed her to the ground, remaining on top of her until her body went limp. The following week, police in Cleveland struck again, murdering a twelve year old boy, Tamir Rice, less than two seconds after arriving at the playground where Rice was playing alone. Making maters worse, the two Cleveland police stood by idly, refusing aid, while Tamir bled to death. When his fourteen-year-old sister attempted to help him, police wrestled her to the ground. 

I remember the breathlessness of the lifting section

I remember the opening bars of the Chambers Brothers

I remember… you grinning at the pleasure we had.

I remember watching the pillow solo and then during Trio A the wings would sometimes flap in my face.

I remember talking to you in the hotel, before “stoned,”

I remember standing around waiting to start the run-thru, and you were talking and then you turned and said, “What are you waiting for?”

I remember the pleasure of huddling in the rolls and Steve coming down on me with his self-conscious silly grin.

I remember the box improvisation with David. 

Whenever one writes about a problem in the United States, especially concerning the racial atmosphere, the problem written about is usually black people, that they are either extremist, irresponsible, or ideologically naïve.

What we want to do here is to talk about white society, and the liberal segment of white society, because we want to prove the pitfalls of liberalism, that is, the pitfalls of liberals in their political thinking.

Whenever articles are written, whenever political speeches are given, or whenever analyses are made about a situation, it is assumed that certain people of one group, either the left or the right, the rich or the poor, the whites or the blacks are causing polarization.

The fact is that conditions cause polarization, and that certain people can act as catalysts to speed up the polarization; for example, Rap Brown or Huey Newton can be a catalyst speeding up the polarization of blacks against whites in the Untied States, but the conditions are already there. George Wallace can speed up the polarization of whites against blacks in America, but again, the conditions are already there.

Many people want to know why, out of the entire white segment of society, we want to criticize the liberals. We have to criticize them because they represent the liaison between both groups, between the oppressed and the oppressor. The liberal tries to become an arbitrator, but he is incapable of solving the problems. He promises the oppressor that he can keep the oppressed under control; that he will stop them from becoming illegal (in this case illegal means violent). At the same time, he promises the oppressed that he will be able to alleviate their suffering—in due time. Historically, of course, we know this is impossible, and our era will not escape history. 

A line is the distance between.

They circled the seafood restaurant singing “We shall not be moved.” Adam Pendleton,  Just back from Los Angeles: A Portrait of Yvonne Rainer, 2016–2017

ADAM PENDLETON IN CONVERSATION WITH ROSELEE GOLDBERG

Thursday, June 25.

11 am on the West Coast; 2 pm East Coast.

 JUST BACK FROM LOS ANGELES—A PORTRAIT OF YVONNE RAINER

Thursday and Friday, June 25 and 26.

7 pm, all time zones.

Text courtesy and © Adam Pendleton.

Adam Pendleton, from top: Just back from Los Angeles: A Portrait of Yvonne Rainer, 2016–2017 (still), single-channel black-and-white video; See the Sin, 2020, drawing; Black Lives Matter (wall work) #2 (detail), 2015, wallpaper; Just back from Los Angeles: A Portrait of Yvonne Rainer; Our Ideas #3, 2018, silkscreen ink on mylar; Just back from Los Angeles: A Portrait of Yvonne Rainer. Images courtesy and © the artists and Pace Gallery.

ILSA BING

As part of the Virtual Collect + Connect program, Photo LA 2020 presents an online tour of the exhibition ILSA BING—QUEEN OF THE LEICA, followed by a discussion with curators Barbara Tannenbaum and David Travis.

ILSA BING—QUEEN OF THE LEICA

Sunday, June 28.

10:30 am on the West Coast; 1:30 pm East Coast.

Ilsa Bing, from top: Self-Portrait with Mirrors, 1931; New York, the Elevated, and Me, 1936; Three Men on Steps on the Seine, 1931; Schiaparelli, Satin Dress, 1933; Greta Garbo Poster, Paris, 1932; It Was So Windy in the Eiffel Tower, 1941; Dancers, Ballet Errante, 1933; Paris, 1952; Circus Acrobat on Black Ball, New York, 1936; Self-Portrait with Leica, 1986. Images courtesy and © Estate of Ilse Bing.

SPIKE LEE VIRTUAL CONVERSATION

A black Vietnam vet who saw DA 5 BLOODS, said, “Spike, what the fuck took you so long?” Black and brown Vietnam vets, they loved the film, and that’s my validation. They put their lives on the line, for the red, white, and blue, while also knowing that their brothers and sisters were fighting another war in the United States of America. — Spike Lee

In conjunction with the release of his new film DA 5 BLOODS, Lee will join Barry Jenkins and other guests this weekend for a virtual conversation and career tribute, presented by the American Cinematheque.

SPIKE LEE VIRTUAL Q & A—MODERATED BY BARRY JENKINS

Saturday, June 20.

5 pm on the West Coast; 8 pm East Coast.

DA 5 BLOODS

Netflix, streaming now.

Spike Lee, Da 5 Bloods (2020), from top: Chadwick Boseman; Clarke Peters (left) and Delroy Lindo; Lindo (in front of line, followed by) Norm Lewis, Isiah Whitlock, Jr., Jonathan Majors, and Peters; Netflix poster, 2020; anti-Vietnam War march; Whitlock, Lewis, Lindo (with rifle), and Peters; Netflix poster. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographers, and Netflix.

JEREMY O. HARRIS

This week, playwright Jeremy O. Harris—author of Slave Play and Daddy: A Melodrama—will participate in the opening night event of the New York Times series OFFSTAGE.

Patti LuPone, Mary-Louise Parker, Katrina Lenk, and Elizabeth Stanley will also perform.

R.s.v.p. below.

OFFSTAGE—OPENING NIGHT

Thursday, June 11.

4 pm on the West Coast; 7 pm East Coast.

Jeremy O. Harris, from top: Ronald Peet and Charlayne Woodard in Daddy: A Melodrama (2019); Kahyun Kim and Tommy Dorfman in Daddy; Kim, Woodard, Peet, Alan Cumming, and Dorfman in Daddy, photograph by Sara Krulwich; Joaquina Kalukango and James Cusati-Moyer in Slave Play, photograph by Joan Marcus; Cusati-Moyer and Ato Blankson-Wood in Slave Play, photograph by Matthew Murphy. Images courtesy and © the actors, photographers, publishers, producers, and playwright.