Category Archives: WEB/TELEVISION/RADIO

NAO BUSTAMANTE IS DELUSIONAL

This week, Dirty Looks and Redcat present a twenty-five-year retrospective of Nao Bustamante’s film, video, and performance work.

“Playing a variety of televisual modes off of one another—telenovela, true crime, reality TV and artist’s video—the program ricochets across media, ruminating on the brown body in an ever-shifting American pop culture landscape, questioning the role of the artist to probe, exploit, engage, and untangle this mess we’re in.”*

NAO BUSTAMANTE IS DELUSIONAL (ON SCREEN)*

Thursday, November 7, at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Nao Bustamante. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, and the New Museum.

JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

“My beautiful city is set on rock between two flowing paths of water that run to the sea. My city is tall and jagged—with gold-slated towers… My city chokes on its breath, and sparkles with its false lights—and sleeps restlessly at night. My city is a lone man walking at night down an empty street watching his shadow grow longer as he passes the last lamp post, seeing no comfort in the blank, dark windows, and hearing his footsteps echo against the building and fade away.” — Jerome Robbins

Admired, disparaged, beloved, feared, Jerome Robbins (1918–1998) was one of the great choreographers of the twentieth century. Arthur Laurents told Robbins he was “a shit” for naming names as a “friendly witness” for HUAC. (Robbins feared being exposed as bisexual.) Yet Laurents continued to collaborate with him, most notably on West Side Story. (Stephen Sondheim, the show’s lyricist, said that Robbins was one of the only geniuses he’d ever worked with.)

Through his work with the American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet, and on Broadway—On the Town, Gypsy, and Fiddler on the Roof, to name just three shows among dozens—Robbins was indelibly associated with his home base and muse: Manhattan.

A new exhibition curated by Julia Foulkes marks Robbins’ centenary and his lifelong celebration of the city, and includes dance films and videos, diaries, paintings, story scenarios, press clippings, and extensive photographic documentation.

VOICE OF MY CITY—JEROME ROBBINS AND NEW YORK

Through March 30.

New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York City.

From top: Sharks and Jets dance in West Side Story, on tour in Europe in the early 2000s; the original Fancy Free cast—Muriel Bentley, Janet Reed, Harold Lang, John Kriza, and Jerome Robbins—in Times Square in 1958, with photographer Gordon Parks leaning over his tripod, courtesy the Jerome Robbins Dance Division/The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Mikhail Baryshnikov in the New York City Ballet production of The Four Seasons (1979), choreographed by Robbins; Antoinette Sibley rehearses Afternoon of a Faun with the choreographer, photograph by Michael Childers, courtesy Dance Magazine; Damian Woetzel and Tiler Peck dance Robbins at Kennedy Center, 2017; Carmen de Lavallade, Robbins, and Yves Saint Laurent—photograph by Whiteside—and Robbins in 1944, both courtesy Dance Magazine.

DENEUVE’S SAINT LAURENT

They met in 1966 on the set of Belle de Jour—each making indelible contributions to Luis Buñuel’s masterpiece—and the following year she was the first to wear the designer’s “le smoking” tuxedo.

In the decades that followed, the relationship between Catherine Deneuve and Yves Saint Laurent bridged friendship, creative expression, and commerce—she was his greatest ambassador.

For Thursday’s live auction at Christie’s, the star has emptied her Normandy closets of over 120 YSL couture pieces. (An online auction the day before will focus on prêt-à-porter.)

CATHERINE DENEUVE

YVES SAINT LAURENT—DE MODE ET AMITIÉ

Thursday, January 24, at 2:30 pm.

Christie’s

9 avenue Matignon, 8th, Paris.

From top: Yves Saint Laurent and Catherine Deneuve, 1968; Helmut Newton (foreground) photographing Yves Saint Laurent and Catherine Deneuve in 1981, photograph by Bruno Bachelet/Paris Match via Getty Images, image credit Christie’s; from right, Zizi Jeanmaire, Deneuve, Françoise HardyElsa Martinelli, and Hélène Rochas at Saint Laurent, 1967, image credit Getty Images; Deneuve at Saint Laurent, photography credit Botti/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images.

MR. SOUL! — LA FILM FESTIVAL

Ellis Haizlip—black, gay, and deeply invested in the African-American liberation and equality movements of the 1960s and ’70s—was the producer and host of the short-lived but seminal public television show Soul!, which aired from 1968 to 1973. Sui generis in its approach and impact, Haizlip’s Soul! gave black voices an unprecedented platform at a crucial time.

Directors Melissa Haizlip and Sam Pollard have brought the life and work of this catalyst to a new generation with the documentary MR. SOUL!, screening this week at the LA Film Festival in its local premiere.

Included in the film are rare interviews and performances by James Baldwin, Nikki Giovanni, Harry BelafonteAl Green, Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, Odetta, Stokely CarmichaelMerry Clayton, Betty Shabazz, George Faison, Toni Morrison, Patti LaBelle, The Last Poets, and many more.

 

MR. SOUL!

Wednesday, September 26, at 7:30 pm.

Writers Guild Theater, 135 South Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills.

Above: Ellis Haizlip interviews Melvin Van Peebles in 1971. Soul! director Stan Lathan looks over a camera operator’s head.

Below: Haizlip, Kathleen Cleaver of the Black Panthers, and a Soul! sound engineer.

Photographs © Chester Higgins Jr.

FIELD OF VISION

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FIELD OF VISION—co-founded by Laura Poitras, Charlotte Cook, and A.J. Schnack—is a “filmmaker-driven documentary unit that commissions and creates original short-form non-fiction films about developing and ongoing stories around the globe.”*

fieldofvision.org/#films

*See: fieldofvision.org/laura-poitras-aj-schnack-charlotte-cook

Laura Poitras. Image credit: Praxis Films.

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