CÉLINE SCIAMMA IN CONVERSATION

At the center of the film is this idea that there is no muse, or that it’s a beautiful word for hiding the reality of how women have been collaborating with artists. I wanted to portray the intellectual dialog and not to forget that there are several brains in the room. We see how art history reduces the collaboration between artists and their companions: before, a muse was this fetishized, silent, beautiful woman sitting in the room, whereas we now know that Dora Maar, the “muse” of Picasso, was this great Surrealist photographer. And Gabrièle Buffet-Picabia, the companion of Picabia, was intensely involved in his evolution…

I wanted to portray the reality of that in the process of actually making a film in strong collaboration with my actresses. — Céline Sciamma, writer and director of PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE

Sciamma and her stars—Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel—are in town to present a special screening of PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE, followed by a Q & A. Three days later, the writer-director will present an encore screening.

PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE

CÉCILE SCIAMMA, NOÉMIE MERLANT, and ADÈLE HAENEL Q & A

Tuesday, January 7, at 7 pm.

CÉCILE SCIAMMA Q & A

Friday, January 10, at 7 pm.

The Landmark

10850 West Pico Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

Cécile Sciamma, Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019), from top: Adèle Haenel; Haenel (left) and Noémie Merlant; Valeria Golino; Haenel and Golino; Merlant; U.S. film poster; Merlant and Haenel; portrait of Haenel’s character; Merlant and Haenel. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographers, and Neon.

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