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LARS MÜLLER AT UCLA

Publisher, designer, and educator Lars Müller will give a Department of Design Media Arts lecture this week at UCLA.

 

LARS MÜLLER

Tuesday, January 22, at 6 pm.

Broad Art Center, UCLA

240 Charles E. Young Drive North, Los Angeles.

Image credit: Lars Müller Publishers.

ON JÖRG IMMENDORFF

“One day, I entered one of [Immendorff’s] cafés—and since then there has been no end to my slipping on the glass-smooth parquet of these paintings again and again and bouncing off the tables.” — Catherine Millet

Critic, editor, and memoirist Catherine Millet will give a talk on Jörg Immendorff, followed by a Q & A with curator and critic Thibaut de Ruyter.

 

GESAMTKUNSTWERK IN THE STYLE OF JÖRG IMMENDORFF—

A LECTURE BY CATHERINE MILLET

Tuesday, January 22, at 7 pm.

Haus der Kunst

Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

Above: Catherine Millet in 2017. Photograph by Jean-Francois Robert.

Below: Jörg Immendorff, Café Deutschland: Contemplating The Question—Where Do I Stand?, 1987. Oil on canvas.

THE EXPANDED GRAPHICS OF HAMILTON AND HOCKNEY

The paintings, drawings, and photographs on view in HOCKNEY/HAMILTON—EXPANDED GRAPHICS—an exhibition in Cologne of the early work of Richard Hamilton and David Hockney—are enhanced by two 25-minute shorts by art-film innovator James Scott.

LOVE’S PRESENTATION (1966) follows Hockney as he created his Il­lus­tra­tions for Four­teen Po­ems by C.P. Ca­va­fy series, and RICHARD HAMILTON (1969) “brings the tem­ples of con­sump­tion, pop stars, and crossed-out Mar­i­lyns back in­to cir­cu­la­tion and dis­solves them in the noise of the me­dia from which Hamil­ton took them.”*

HOCKNEY/HAMILTON—EXPANDED GRAPHICS*

Through April 14.

Museum Ludwig

Hein­rich-Böll-Platz, Cologne.

From top: Richard Hamilton, My Marilyn (paste-up), 1964, oil on photographs, Museum Ludwig, Cologne; James Scott, still from Love’s Presentation (1966; Hockney drawing directly from photographs onto the plate), image courtesy of Scott; Richard Hamilton, Swingeing London 67 II, 1968, screenprint and oil on canvas, Museum LudwigDavid Hockney, Two Boys, from Il­lus­tra­tions for Four­teen Po­ems by C.P. Ca­va­fy (1966), etching and aquatint on paper, donated to Museum Ludwig by Her­bert Mey­er-Ellinger and Chris­toph Vow­inck­el © David HockneyRichard Hamilton, Palindrome, 1974, acrylic film on collotype on paper, Museum Ludwig, Cologne, loan Freunde der Art Cologne e.V., 2012. All Hamilton: © R. Hamilton, all rights reserved/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.

JORDAN CASTEEL

Jordan Casteel—two of whose paintings are part of ONE DAY AT A TIME at MOCA—will discuss the exhibition at the museum during a public tour this weekend.

And Casteel’s museum show RETURNING THE GAZE will open in Denver next month.

JORDAN CASTEEL ON ONE DAY AT A TIME—MANNY FARBER AND TERMITE ART

Sunday, January 20, at 3 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

 

JORDAN CASTEEL—RETURNING THE GAZE

February 2 through August 18.

Denver Art Museum

100 West 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver.

From top:

Jordan Casteel, Memorial, 2017. Oil on canvas. Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Image courtesy the artist and MOCA.

Jordan CasteelBenyam, 2018. Oil on canvas. Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg Collection. Image courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York.

Jordan Casteel, Glass Man Michael, 2016. Oil on canvas. Collection of John L. Thomson, Minneapolis. Image courtesy the artist and MOCA.

Jordan CasteelYahya, 2014. Oil on canvas. Collection of Jim and Julie Taylor. Image courtesy Sargent’s Daughters, New York.

All images © Jordan Casteel.

ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

“While geological epochs are known as products of slow change, the Anthropocene has been characterized by speed. Runaway climate change, rising water, surging population, non-stop extinction, and expanding technologies compress our breathless sense of space and time.”*

Organized around seven themes—Deluge, Raw Material, Consumption, Extinction, Symbiosis and Multispecies, Justice, and Imaginary Futures—the traveling exhibition THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE explores the ongoing crisis through the work of over forty artists.

THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE*

Through March 3.

Harn Museum of Art

University of Florida

3259 Hull Road, Gainesville.

From April 27 through July 28:

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

University of Michigan Museum of Art

525 South State Street, Ann Arbor.

See: Antek Walczak, “Welcome to the Anthropocene: Tornadoes of Cash and Hurricanes of Capital,” in Oscar Tuazon Live (Los Angeles: DoPe Press/Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014), 55–62.

THE WORLD TO COME includes work by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Claudia Andujar, Sammy Baloji, Subhankar Banerjee, Huma Bhabha, Liu Bolin, Edward Burtynsky, Sandra Cinto, Elena Damiani, Dornith Doherty, Charles Gaines, Mishka Henner, Felipe Jácome, Chris Jordan, William Kentridge, Wifredo Lam, Maroesjka Lavigne, Eva Leitolf, Dana Levy, Yao Lu, Pedro Neves Marques, Noelle Mason, Mary Mattingly, Gideon Mendel, Ana Mendieta, Kimiyo Mishima, Richard Misrach, Beth Moon, Richard Mosse, Jackie Nickerson, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, Abel Rodríguez, Allan Sekula, Taryn Simon, Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Laurencia Strauss, Thomas Struth, Bethany Taylor, Frank Thiel, Sergio Vega, Andrew Yang, and Haegue Yang.

From top:

Taryn SimonWhite Tiger (Kenny), Selective Inbreeding, Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and Foundation, Eureka Springs,Arkansas(detail), 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007 © Taryn Simon.

Liu Bolin, Hiding in the City, No. 95, Coal Pile, 2010. Image courtesy the artist. © Liu Bolin.

Richard Mosse, Stalemate, 2011, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Maroesjka LavigneWhite Rhino, Namibia. From the series Land of Nothingness (2015). Courtesy of the artist.

Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Spatial Intervention 1, video still, 2002. Courtesy the artists. © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2017.