FOUR QUARTETS — TANOWITZ, MARDEN, SAARIAHO

If I am right to think this is the greatest creation of dance theater so far this century, we’re fortunate that FOUR QUARTETS will travel to other stages. I long to become more deeply acquainted with the many layers of its stage poetry.Alastair Macaulay

In great demand and at the height of her powers, Pam Tanowitz creates work that bridges contemporary dance and ballet. Her FOUR QUARTETS—the most acclaimed dance work of the past two decades—is a collaboration with Brice Marden, who created the set images, and composer Kaija Saariaho.

The title refers to T. S. Eliot’s poetry cycle, which provided the inspiration and text for the work, read in performance by Kathleen Chalfant.

This weekend, CAP UCLA presents two performances of FOUR QUARTETS at Royce Hall. Dancers include Kara Chan, Jason Collins, Dylan Crossman, Christine Flores, Zachary Gonder, Lindsey Jones, Victor Lozano, Maile Okamura, and Melissa Toogood.

The scenic and lighting design is by Clifton Taylor, the costume design by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung, and the sound design by Jean-Baptiste Barriére. Saariaho’s music will be performed by The Knights.

PAM TANOWITZ, BRICE MARDEN, and KAIJA SAARIAHO—FOUR QUARTETS

Saturday, February 15, at 8 pm.

Sunday, February 16, at 3 pm.

Royce Hall, UCLA

10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles.

Pam Tanowitz, Brice Marden, Kaija Saariaho, Four Quartets, in performance. Photographs by Maria Baranova. Images courtesy and © the artists, the dancers, the photographer, and CAP UCLA.

AVERY SINGER AND ARAM MOSHAYEDI

In conjunction with Hauser & Wirth’s presentation of the work of Avery Singer at Frieze Los Angeles, the artist will join Hammer Museum curator Aram Moshayedi for a conversation “[exploring] Singer’s distinctive use of digital tools, including 3D modeling software, her deft engagement with established traditions of archival documentation, and her groundbreaking techniques that she uses to question the ways in which images and their distribution are increasingly informed by new media and technologies.”*

AVERY SINGER IN CONVERSATION WITH ARAM MOSHAYEDI*

Saturday, February 15, at 4 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Avery Singer. Artwork images and artist photograph courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

LUCHITA HURTADO AND HANS ULRICH OBRIST

The most interesting thing for me now is to make sure that the planet is going in the right direction. I keep the words sky, water, earth, fire in my mind. Those are the elements, and that’s what my work has come to be about. That’s what I’m about… When I think about my painting and the political and the planet, it’s about the hope that it’s not too late and that people can still get together and in whatever small way make a difference that adds up. As far as physical strength and ability goes, I’m very weak, of course, because of my age, but I still can paint, I can still draw. And so that’s my contribution…

I enjoy life, and I feel I’ve been different people. I was a different person, for example, when I did these very sexy drawings and paintings of my body, looking at my body. [Laughs] It’s the truth. Sex was all I could think about…

When I used to go to my house in Taos, New Mexico, and go to watch tribal dances, they wouldn’t ask me if I was Indian; they would say, “What tribe are you?” I would say, “Venezuelan.’”And they’d say, “I’ve never heard of that one!”… Within myself, I felt that I was Indian. I felt that very much when I went to the dances, because the tribes had a complete attitude towards the earth, that it was alive. I remember asking why the dances in the winter were different from the summer dances. A lot of stomping went on in the summer. I asked a man about this once, and he said, “Because the earth is asleep, of course, in winter.” Instead of stomping, they drag the foot, so as not to wake the earth. It’s an attitude toward the planet as a living thing.Luchita Hurtado*

Frieze Los Angeles brings Hans Ulrich Obrist to the city for a conversation with Hurtado, who worked with the curator on her retrospective I LIVE I DIE I WILL BE REBORN—which opens at LACMA on February 16..

The discussion will be moderated by Jennifer King, associate curator of Contemporary Projects at LACMA.

LUCHITA HURTADO and HANS ULRICH OBRIST IN CONVERSATION

Saturday, February 15, at 2 pm.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*“The Painter and the Planetarian: Luchita Hurtado in Conversation with Andrea Bowers,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

Also see the monograph I LIVE I DIE I WILL BE REBORN.

Luchita Hurtado, from top: Untitled, 1973, oil on canvas and thread, photograph by Brian Forrest; Encounter, 1971, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1975, oil on canvas, photograph by Jeff McLane; Untitled, 1971, photograph by McLane; The Umbilical Cord of the Earth is the Moon, 1977, oil on canvas, photograph by McLane; Untitled, circa 1951, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, photograph by Genevieve Hanson; Untitled, 1972, oil on canvas, photograph by Hanson; Luchita Hurtado—I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn monograph cover, image courtesy and © Walther König.

Photograph of Luchita Hurtado by Man Ray, 1947, courtesy and © Man Ray 2015 Trust/Artists Rights Society, New York / Adagp, Paris. Artwork images courtesy and © Hurtado and Hauser & Wirth.

FRIEZE LOS ANGELES — ITEM IDEM

Item Idem (Cyril Duval) is in town for Frieze Los Angeles, where he will present his new experimental short COLD SINGLE—directed in collaboration with Mel Hsieh—and join Frieze Film curator Venus Lau in conversation.

COLD SINGLE

Friday, February 14, from 11 am to 2 pm.

ITEM IDEM IN CONVERSATION with VENUS LAU

Saturday, February 15, at 1:30 pm.

Paramount Theater

5555 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles.

Mel Hsieh and Item Idem, Cold Single (2019). Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, the participants, Nowness, and Frieze.

KIM GORDON AND CHRISTOPHER WOOL

The Broad presents Kim Gordon and Christopher Wool in conversation at the Colburn School as the museum celebrates its fifth anniversary with a Wool exhibition.

The evening will be moderated by John Corbett, author of Extended Play—Sounding Off from John Cage to Dr. Funkenstein and co-owner of the Chicago gallery Corbett vs. Dempsey.

THE UN-PRIVATE COLLECTION—CHRISTOPHER WOOL and KIM GORDON and JOHN CORBETT

Saturday, February 15, at 2 pm.

Zipper Hall at the Colburn School

200 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Top and bottom: Artwork by Kim Gordon. Above: Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2008. Below: Wool, Untitled, 1991. Images courtesy and © the artists and their galleries.