FRANKENTHALER IN VENICE

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992—an exhibition at Palazzo Grimani—is the first presentation of her work in Venice since the 33rd Biennale in 1966.

Curated by John Elderfield, the show features fourteen works and “focuses on the artist’s development of the pittura (painting) and the panorama: the interplay between works like easel paintings, although made on the floor, and large, horizontal paintings that open onto shallow but expansive spaces, in the way that panoramas do.”*

“There are no rules. I’d rather risk an ugly surprise than rely on things I know I can do. Art has a will of its own. You have to know how to use the accident, how to recognize it, how to control it, and ways to eliminate it so that the whole surface looks felt and born all at once.” — Helen Frankenthaler

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992*

Through November 17.

Palazzo Grimani

Ramo Grimani 4858, Venice.

From top: Helen FrankenthalerRiverhead, 1963, acrylic on canvas; Frankenthaler (center) in Venice in 1966 for the 33rd Biennale; Helen FrankenthalerMaelstrom, 1992, acrylic on canvas; Helen FrankenthalerFor E.M., 1981, acrylic on canvas (“E.M.” is Édouard Manet); Frankenthaler pouring paint—her “soak-stain” technique—onto a large unprimed canvas, photographs by Ernest Haas (2): images from the exhibition catalog Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, published by Gagosian, 2019 (3); Helen FrankenthalerOpen Wall, 1953, oil on unsized, unprimed canvas; Frankenthaler in her studio at Third Avenue and East 94th Street, New York City, with  Mediterranean Thoughts (1960, in progress, left) and Figure with Thoughts (1960, in progress, center), March 1960, photograph by Tony Vaccaro. Images of Frankenthaler works were photographed by Rob McKeever and are courtesy and © the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc., Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Gagosian, 2019.

THE QUEEN, RESTORED

My name is Jack. Well, my mother called me Jack, everybody that cares about me calls me Jack. But I work under the name Sabrina. And all the queens call me by the name Sabrina, whenever I see them. I go up to this queen and say, “What’s your name?” The queen says, “Monique.” And you say, “That’s marvelous darling, but what was your name before?” And the queen will look at you straight in the eye and say, “There was no before.”Jack Doroshow, aka Flawless Sabrina, in THE QUEEN

It’s the late 1960s and national representatives of a burgeoning countercultural movement are gathered in Manhattan for their annual conclave. These young men, however, are not protesting the war in Vietnam but—in at least one case—eager to enlist, not burning the flag but waving it in a musical number. Led by Doroshow—and armed with maquillage, Dexedrine, miles of wig tape, costumes by Mme. Berthé, and a devotion to retrograde Hollywood archetypes and the grand gesture—the “girls” have taken over a dive midtown hotel to prepare for the 1967 Miss All-American Camp Beauty Pageant, the country’s preeminent drag contest.

Interviewed by judges Larry Rivers and Terry Southern (Andy Warhol is also in the house), there is—all things considered—a minimum of shade-throwing, at least during pre-pageant prep. But once he action moves to the main event at Town Hall, the festivities come to a raucous end when runner-up Crystal LaBeija reads everyone within earshot to dirt.

Thanks to director Frank Simon, this was all captured on 16mm film and released as THE QUEEN in 1968. Thanks to a team of film preservationists, the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project, and Kino Lorber, we can now watch this peerless time capsule—previously seen only in glimpses during the opening titles of the first season of Transparent—in its entirety.

THE QUEEN

Through August 8.

Downtown Independent

251 South Main Street, Los Angeles.

See “Flawless Sabrina,” interview by Michael Bullock, Apartamento 19 (Spring-Summer 2017), 272–287.

The Queen, from top: Jack Doroshow, aka Flawless Sabrina; backstage (2); Richard, aka Harlow (3); Kino Lorber poster; Doroshow; the gown competition finale (2). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the performers, and Kino Lorber.

NOW FEST WEEK TWO AT REDCAT

The second weekend of one-of-a-kind disruptions, investigations, and interventions that make up Redcat’s NEW ORIGINAL WORKS FESTIVAL 2019 includes performances by Kate Watson-Wallace, Hprizm, Verónica Casado Hernández , Alexandro Segade, Amy Ruhl, and Paul Outlaw—who was recently seen stealing the show in Boston Court’s transgressive production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

See link below for full program.

NEW ORIGINAL WORKS FESTIVAL 2019—WEEK TWO

Thursday through Saturday, August 1, 2, and 3.

All shows at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Paul Outlaw, BBC (Big Black Cockroach); Alexandro Segade and Amy RuhlPopular Revolt (2); Kate Watson-Wallace, Hprizm, and Verónica Casado Hernándezkim (2). Photographs by Vanessa Crocini. Images courtesy and © the performers, the photographers, and Redcat.

KIM GORDON — SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND

Inhabiting the four rooms of the IMMA’s Courtyard Galleries, Kim Gordon’s exhibition SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND presents new and unseen work—including paintings, drawings, sculptures from the Noise Painting, From the Boyfriend, and Airbnb series—and an immersive video projection.

KIM GORDON—SHE BITES HER TENDER MIND

Through November 10.

Irish Museum of Modern Art

Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin.

See “No Retirement Plan: Kim Gordon and Carrie Brownstein in Conversation with Dorothée Perret.” PARIS LA 15 (2017).

Kim Gordon, from top: Proposal For a Dance, 2008–2010, DVD still, 12 minutes; Dead Machines, 2018, acrylic on canvas; Lay Down Thy Limbs 2, 2019, acrylic and medium on canvas; Black Glitter Circle, 2008, glitter; Mood, 2018, acrylic on canvas; Untitled (from the boyfriend series), 2015, acrylic, medium, and interference powder on denim skirt; Proposal For a Dance, 2008–2010, still. Images courtesy and © the artist and 303 Gallery, New York.

HARALD SZEEMANN — SELECTED WRITINGS

Harald Szeemann (1933–2005)—curator, artist, art historian, and “secretary general” of the legendary documenta 5—was an exhibition maker nonpareil. HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS—published in conjunction with last year’s exhibition Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions at the Getty Research Institute (home of the Harald Szeemann Papers)—brings together over seventy essays and interviews, many published in English for the first time.

Richly illustrated throughout, the book contains a 20-page section of plates, including Szeemann’s artwork, exhibition diagrams, installation views, archival photographs, and other ephemera.

“I’m an existentialist. You are thrown in the universe from somewhere and are, once here, responsible for your acts. But it’s always a privilege to fall into a well-made bed. In this case, the Kunsthalle Bern in 1961…

“The historical moment, when the image of the creator/curator became conscious and evident, happened in 1969, when I organized When Attitudes Become Form and the artists arrived and installed their works and the TV reports publicized it. Beuys put his grease on the walls, Heizer made a hole in the public sidewalk, Artschwager distributed his blps in the city, Barry put the building under radiation, Weiner removed a square meter of wall, Ruthenbeck ruined the wooden floor with his wet ashes, Serra threw melted lead against the wall, etc., etc. This was no longer perceived as an art exhibition but as an archaic provocation—not by the artists, but by the curator who allowed it.” — Harald Szeemann*

HARALD SZEEMANN: SELECTED WRITINGS. Edited by Doris Chon, Glenn Phillips, and Pietro Rigolo. Translated by Jonathan Blower and Elizabeth Tucker. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2018.

In New York, the Swiss Institute has restaged GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE USthe 1974 exhibition Szeemann organized in his Bern apartment two years after documenta 5.

HARALD SZEEMANN—GRANDFATHER: A PIONEER LIKE US

Through August 18.

Swiss Institute

38 St. Marks Place, New York City.

*”Making Things Possible: A Conversation with Harald Szeemann.” Interview by Beti Žerovc. In Harald Szeemann—Selected Writings, 383–393.

From top, left to right: Harald Szeemann, in the 1990s in the Fabbrica Rosa, his office and archive in Maggia, Switzerland, photograph Fredo Meyer-Henn, State Archive of Canton Bern; Szeemann’s address list for his 1968 research trip to New York—for the Kunsthalle Bern exhibition Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form (1969)—includes contact info for Eva Hesse, Hans Haacke, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, and Lucas Samaras; Szeemann (seated) on the last night of documenta 5, 1972, photograph by Balthasar Burkhard; Getty Publications book cover; Lidija Delić, poster art commissioned by the Swiss Institute for the Grandfather: A Pioneer Like Us exhibition; Oasis No. 7, Haus-Rucker-Co (Laurids Ortner, Manfred Ortner, Klaus Pinter, Günter Zamp Kelp), 1972, documenta 5: Questioning Reality—Image Worlds Today, Kassel, 1972; part of Szeemann’s rubber stamp collection; Szeemann. Images courtesy the Harald Szeeman Papers at the Getty Research Institute, © J. Paul Getty Trust.