JACOB JONAS AND DANIEL EZRALOW

Jacob Jonas The Company will close out its triumphant 2018–2019 season as the Wallis Company-in-Residence with two performances this weekend.

Daniel Ezralow will join company founder Jacob Jonas to dance in the world premiere of their new work viceversa. The evenings will end with a second world premiere: THERE’S BEEN A STUDY, choreographed by Jonas to an original score by vocalist and pianist Nicole Miglis—lead singer of Hundred Waters—which she will perform live.

Also on the bill: TO THE DOLLAR, Jonas‘ dance interpretation of Senator Elizabeth Warren‘s 2016 speech on income inequality:

“Today is Equal Pay Day. By the sound of it, one would think it is some sort of historic holiday commemorating the anniversary of a landmark day that our country guaranteed equal pay for women, but that is not what it is about—not even close. Because in the year 2016, at a time when we have self-driving cars and computers that fit on our wrists, women still make only 79 cents for every $1 a man makes, and we are still standing in the U.S. Congress debating whether a woman should get fired for asking what the guy down the hall makes for doing exactly the same job…

“Equal Pay Day isn’t a national day of celebration. It is a national day of embarrassment.”

JACOB JONAS THE COMPANY

Friday and Saturday, May 10 and 11, at 7:30 pm.

Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

9390 Santa Monica Boulevard, Beverly Hills.

Jacob Jonas The Company in performance at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, May 10, 2019, from top: Daniel Ezralow and Jacob Jonas, viceversa, Ezralow (left) and Jonas; Jacob Jonas, Crash, Jill Wilson and Nicolas Walton; Crash (from left), Lorrin Brubaker, Emma Rosenzweig-Bock, Danielle Coleman, Joy Isabella Brown, Wilson, Walton, and Mike Tyus; Jacob Jonas, To the Dollar, Brown (left) and Walton; To the Dollar, Rosenzweig-Bock (left) and Brubaker; Jacob Jonas, There’s Been a Study, Rosenzweig-Bock and Tyus; viceversa, Ezralow (left) and Jonas. Photographs by Matthew Brush.

RON GORCHOV

Eight of Ron Gorchow‘s curved surface paintings—including two stacked works—are now on view at Modern Art in London.

RON GORCHOV

Through May 11

Modern Art

4–8 Helmet Row, Clerkenwell, London.

Ron Gorchov, oil on linen, from top: CLEO, 2018; MEROPE, 2017; NNA PERENNA, 2017; ASCELLA, 2017; NAUSICAÄ, 2016. Images © Ron Gorchov, photographs by Ben Westoby, courtesy the artist, Modern Art, London, and Cheim & Read, New York.

ATE9 AT THE RUBY STREET

Starting tomorrow and continuing every Thursday night in May, the Ate9 dance company begins a residency at the Highland Park creative space The Ruby Street, with a closing night post-performance party on May 30.

Local audiences remember performances by Danielle Agami‘s acclaimed troupe at Royce Hall and The Wallis, and the 1 TO 3 engagement provides a rare opportunity to see the company in an intimate setting.

ATE9—1 TO 3

Thursday, May 9, 16, 23, and 30.

The Ruby Street

6408 Ruby Street, Los Angeles.

Also on Monday, May 20, at 7 pm.

A Noise Within

3352 East Foothill Boulevard, Pasadena.

Ate9 dancers, from top: Jordan Lovestrand; cast; Alexander Quetell and Ariana Daub; Sarah Butler; Montay Romero (top) and Lovestrand; Jobel Medina; Rebecah Goldstone (left) and Butler; cast. Photography by Cheryl Mann Productions.

VINCE ALETTI’S ISSUES

Who better than Vince Aletti to organize and aggregate a virtual tour of his massive and coveted collection of periodicals into the pages of a deluxe art book?

Something like this awaits the readers of ISSUES, a new publication from Phaidon.

The book includes work by Diane Arbus, Corinne Day, Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Edward Steichen, Toni Frissell, Irving Penn, Horst, Collier Schorr, Inez Van Lamsweerde, Vinoodh Matadin, Bill Cunningham, and Cindy Sherman.

VINCE ALETTI—ISSUES: A HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN FASHION MAGAZINES (London: Phaidon, 2019).

From top: Horst P. Horst, Vogue, June 1, 1940, cover model Lisa Fonssagrives; Melvin Sokolsky, Harper’s Bazaar, March 1963, model Simone D’Aillencourt; Vince Aletti‘s apartment, photographed by Jason Schmidt, courtesy of the photographer and Phaidon; Corinne Day, The Face, July 1990, model Kate Moss.

JEAN BAUDRILLARD AT CHÂTEAU SHATTO

A selection of the photographs of Jean BaudrillardTHE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I—is now on view at Château Shatto.

“It is not true that we need to believe in our own existence to live… Our consciousness is never in fact the echo of our own reality, of our existence in ‘real time,’ but rather the echo in delayed time, the dispersion screen of the subject and its identity. We are only distinguishable from ourselves in sleep, unconsciousness, and death. This consciousness, which is something altogether different than belief, comes more spontaneously from challenging reality, from siding with objective illusion than from objective reality. This challenge is more vital for our survival and for the survival of the species than the belief in reality and existence, which are spiritual consolations for use in another world.” — Jean Baudrillard*

JEAN BAUDRILLARD—THE CONSPIRACY OF ART: PART I

Through May 25.

Château Shatto

1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030, downtown Los Angeles.

*Jean Baudrillard, La Pensée radicale (Paris: Sens & Tonka, 1994); “Radical Thought,” in The Conspiracy of Art, edited by Sylvère Lotringer and translated by Ames Hodges (New York: Semiotext(e), 2005), 162–177.

From top: Jean Baudrillard, St. Clément II, 1988, front and reverse; Baudrillard.