ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS(1960)—Luchino Visconti’s sixth feature—marked a return to the director’s neo-realist roots while simultaneously advancing the grand style he adopted in the mid-1950s with Senso.

“One of the most sumptuous black-and-white pictures I’ve ever seen.” — Martin Scorsese

This epic story of a southern Italian family transplanted to Milan stars Annie Girardot, Claudia Cardinale, Katina Paxinou, and—on the male side—a veritable Alasdair McLellan portfolio avant la lettre, led by Alain Delon in the title role of Rocco Parondi.*

“Like all migrants, they are in search of opportunity, but instead they find an environment that only magnifies their respective strengths and weaknesses.” — Scott Eyman

As part of the American Cinematheque series Luchino Visconti—Cinematic Nobility—co-presented by Luce CinecittàROCCO will screen twice this month in a DCP restored by Cineteca di Bologna in association with Titanus.

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS

Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Saturday, March 30, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

*When a judge with the same name threatened to sue the filmmakers, the family name “Pafundi” in the original negative was changed, post-production, to “Parondi.”

From top: Alain Delon in Rocco and His Brothers; Renato Salvatori as brother Simone and Annie Girardot as Nadia; Luchino Visconti (second from left) on set; Max Cartier, as brother Ciro, and Delon; Salvatori (left), Visconti, Claudia Cardinale as Ginetta, and Delon on set; Delon, with Rocco Vidolazzi as younger brother Luca.

THE PASSION OF MCQUEEN

The opera-in-development THE PASSION OF MCQUEEN imagines the last hours in the life of Alexander McQueen.

A staged concert of the forthcoming work—with music by Kentaro Kameyama, libretto by William Nedved, and direction by Diana Wyenn—will feature mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell as Isabella Blow, and baritone David Castillo as Lee.

THE PASSION OF MCQUEEN concert

Friday, March 1, at 8 pm.

Boston Court

70 North Mentor Avenue, Pasadena.

From top: David Castillo, courtesy the artist; Peabody Southwell, courtesy the Metropolitan Opera, New York; Alexander McQueen, photograph by Ann Deniau, courtesy the photographer and Bleecker Street.

AGNES MARTIN’S GABRIEL

“The process of life is hidden from us. The meaning of suffering is held from us. And we are blind to life.

“We are blinded by pride. Pride has built another structure and it is called ‘Life,’ but living the prideful life we are frustrated and lost. It is not possible to overthrow pride… because we ourselves are pride… But we can witness the defeat of pride because pride cannot hold out. Pride is not real, so sooner or later it must go down.

“When pride in some form is lost we feel very different. We feel victory over pride, and we feel very different being for a few moments free of pride. We feel a moment of perfection that is indescribable, a sudden joy in living.” — Agnes Martin*

GABRIEL—Martin’s only completed film—will screen in conversation with several of her abstract paintings as part of the exhibition FOCUS—AGNES MARTIN in London.

FOCUS—AGNES MARTIN

Through April 13.

Lévy Gorvy

22 Old Bond Street, London.

*Agnes Martin, “On the Perfection Underling Life” (1973), in Writings (Ostfildern: Cantz Verlag, 1991), 67.

Agnes Martin, Gabriel (1976), stills, © Agnes Martin/DACS 2019, courtesy Pace Gallery.

BILL TRAYLOR BLUE

As part of the Smithsonian exhibition BETWEEN WORLDS—THE ART OF BILL TRAYLOR, musicians Jason Moran and Marvin Sewell will improvise a musical conversation between the art of Traylor—who was born into slavery in 1853, and took up art in his eighties while living on the street in Montgomery, Alabama—and the music of his time.

BILL TRAYLOR BLUE—JASON MORAN and MARVIN SEWELL

Friday, March 1, at 7 pm.

Smithsonian American Art Museum

McEvoy Auditorium

8th Street and G Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

BETWEEN WORLDS—THE ART OF BILL TRAYLOR

Through April 7.

Smithsonian American Art Museum

8th Street and F Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

From top: Bill Traylor, Truncated Blue Man with Pipe, circa 1939–1942, courtesy Louis-Dreyfus Family Collection; Bill Traylor, Untitled (Yellow and Blue House with Figures and Dog), 1939, colored pencil on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum; Bill Traylor, Red Man, circa 1939–1942, collection Jerry and Susan Lauren, © Smithsonian Institution; Bill TraylorUntitled (Seated Woman), circa 1940–1942, pencil and opaque watercolor on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Margaret Z. Robson Collection, © 1994, Bill Traylor Family Trust.

ON ROMARE BEARDEN

At Getty Center and at CAAM, Mary Schmidt Campbell will discuss the artist and his times at the center of her new book AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY: THE LIFE AND WORK OF ROMARE BEARDEN.

Bearden’s work will be on view at The Broad in the upcoming exhibition SOUL OF A NATION—ART IN THE AGE OF BLACK POWER, 1963–1983.

MARY SCHMIDT CAMPBELL—AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY

Thursday, February 28, at 11 am.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

Sunday, March 3, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

California African American Museum

600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles.

Also see Ralph Ellison, “The Art of Romare Bearden,” in Art in America, 1945–1970: Writings from the Age of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and Minimalism, edited by Jed Perl (New York: Library of America, 2014), 701–710.

From top: Romare BeardenRiver Mist ,1962, © Romare Bearden Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York; Bearden (left) with Ernest Crichlow (standing with glass) and Norman Lewis (seated far right), co-founders of the Cinque Gallery, courtesy Romare Bearden Foundation; Romare Bearden, Sha-ba, 1970, collage on paper, cloth, and synthetic polymer paint on composition board, photograph by Allen Phillips, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art; Romare Bearden, Pittsburgh Memory, 1964 (detail), mixed media collage and graphite on board, © Romare Bearden Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York.