OUTFEST 2019 — BARBARA HAMMER

TENDER FICTIONS—the late, great Barbara Hammer’s follow-up to Nitrate Kisses—traces the filmmaker’s evolution from would-be child-star of the fifties to heterosexual “earth mother” of the sixties to the lesbian artist and activist of her last decades.

As part of The Legacy Project—a partnership between OUTFEST and UCLATENDER FICTIONS (1996) will screen this weekend as part of the festival.

TENDER FICTIONS

Sunday, July 21, at noon.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

See A. L. Steiner on Hammer.

From top: Barbara Hammer, Tender Fictions; Barbara Hammer, On the Road, Big Sur, California, 1975, 2017, gelatin silver print; Barbara Hammer, Sappho Production Meeting, Los Angeles, 1978; Hammer. Images courtesy and © the artist’s estate.

DAVID CROSBY IN CONVERSATION

He was central to the Laurel Canyon scene of the 1960s, created some of the most resonant music of his era, fell in love with Joni Mitchell, became addicted to heroin and cocaine, and—after a weapons and drug conviction—became a fugitive from the law.

But it wasn’t until after his eventual arrest, getting clean in prison, and restarting his musical life with old bandmates that David Crosby managed to alienate every important person he made music with—Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, and Neil Young.

Such is the intractable nature of the subject of the essential new documentary DAVID CROSBY—REMEMBER MY NAME, directed by A. J. Eaton and produced by Cameron Crowe, who has known Crosby since Crowe was a teenage reporter for Rolling Stone. In Eaton’s film, Crosby praises the artist “who was the best of all of us”:

“When [Joni] found she was going over people’s heads, she went further.”

But no one is harder on Crosby than Crosby himself:

“I was a difficult cat. Big ego, no brains… What you do to yourself isn’t really a moral thing. But what you do to others? That counts… Were those girls addicted? Yes. And I addicted them.”

But there is another sticking point:

“I have to tour to buy groceries and pay the mortgage…. I’m under some pressure. I’m the only member of CSN&Y who’s never had a [solo] hit.”

A fitting companion piece to Martin Scorsese’s new Bob Dylan doc Rolling Thunder Revue—in REMEMBER MY NAME, Crosby claims it was The Byrds’ cover of “Mr. Tambourine Man” that inspired Dylan to go electric—what echoes up and down the canyon are the sounds of a lost sixties dream:

” ‘Ohio’ was the best job of being troubadours or town criers we ever did… Belief is good. It didn’t work out. Yet. But we’re trying.” — David Crosby

At the Film Independent Presents screening this week in Hollywood, Crowe characterized the film as “notes from the eye of the hurricane” which ends “on a precipice, where CSN&Y don’t reconcile.” On Sunday afternoon, Eaton and Crowe will return to the ArcLight and join David Crosby for a post-screening Q & A.

DAVID CROSBY—REMEMBER MY NAME

Now playing.

DAVID CROSBY, A. J. EATON, and CAMERON CROWE Q & A

Sunday, July 21, after the 2:45 pm show.

Arclight Hollywood

6360 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Henry Diltz, David Crosby, Flag Gun, 1970; Henry Diltz, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Los Angeles, CA, 1969; Henry Diltz, Joni Mitchell, David Crosby, and Eric Clapton, Laurel Canyon, 1968, photographs © Henry Diltz. Director A. J. Eaton and producer Cameron Crowe at the Film Independent Presents David Crosby—Remember My Name event at the ArcLight Hollywood on July 18, 2019, photographs (2) by Amanda Edwards/Getty Images. John Lennon (left), Crosby, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison in London during the Sgt. Pepper recording sessions, 1967, photograph by Leslie Bryce. Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, Cass Elliot, David Geffen, Ned Doheny and others at John Van Hamersveld’s studio in Venice Beach for Boyd Elder’s opening, 1972.

OLIVER PAYNE AND MARTINE SYMS AT OOGA BOOGA

For two of its last public events before closing shop for good, OOGA BOOGA welcomes Oliver Payne and Martine Syms for in-store appearances, conversation, readings, music, and a trunk show.

OLIVER PAYNE and SAFE CRACKERS

Saturday, July 20, from 4 pm to 6 pm.

MARTINE SYMS and DOMINICA PUBLISHING

Sunday, July 21, from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Ooga Booga

943 North Broadway, suite 203, Chinatown, Los Angeles.

From top: T-shirt designed by Oliver Payne; Borrowed Lady—Martine Syms, the third in Simon Fraser University Gallery’s Critical Reader Series from Syms’ exhibition, on view at the Audain Gallery from October 13 to December 10, 2016; Ooga Booga (2); exterior view of Borrowed Time—Martine Syms, Audain Gallery, SFU, Burnaby, British Columbia. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, Ooga Booga, and Simon Fraser University.

LIZ LARNER ON CHRIS BURDEN

Liz Larner, who “first encountered Chris Burden and his practice—a catalyst for Larner’s own use of scale and process—during her time at CalArts,” will give a talk on the late artist at Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.*

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS—LIZ LARNER ON CHRIS BURDEN*

Sunday, July 21, at 3 pm.

Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Liz Larner, photograph by Laure Joliet, courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles; stills (2) from Burden (2016), directed by Timothy Marrinan and Richard Dewey, courtesy and © the filmmakers.

LITLIT BOOK FAIR

This weekend, join Dagny Corcoran of Art Catalogues, Michaela Unterdörfer of Hauser & Wirth Publishers, artists Alexandra Grant and Paul McCarthy, writers Melissa Broder and Alissa Nutting, and poets Yesika Salgado and Vickie Vértiz—among many others—at LITLIT, the Little Literary Fair, at Hauser & Wirth in downtown Los Angeles.

The fair is presented by the Los Angeles Review of Books and Hauser & Wirth Publishers. See link below for special talks and events, and participating publishers, booksellers, and vendors.

LIT LIT BOOK FAIR

Saturday and Sunday, July 20 and 21.

11 am through 6 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

Top two images courtesy Hauser & Wirth; third from top courtesy Kaya Press, remaining images courtesy Art Catalogues (open book and “Grass Piece” page images from Lee Lozano, Not Working). Images © the artists and publishers.