Tag Archives: Aero Theatre

VISCONTI — THE LEOPARD

The American Cinematheque begins its series Luchino Visconti—Cinematic Nobility with the epic masterpiece THE LEOPARD, an apotheosis of the director’s social and aesthetic predilections.

The film stars Burt Lancaster as a Bourbon prince in Risorgimento-era Italy hoping to forestall the end of his aristocratic way of life—under threat by Garibaldi and his redshirts—with the marriage of his nephew (Alain Delon) to a rich merchant’s daughter (Claudia Cardinale).

Based on the classic novel by Giuseppe di Lampedusa, THE LEOPARD will screen twice during the series in a DCP beautifully restored by the Cineteca di Bologna and co-presented by Luce Cinecittà.

THE LEOPARD

Thursday, February 7, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Friday, March 29, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Burt Lancaster as Prince Don Fabrizio Salina in The LeopardAlain Delon as Tancredi Falconeri and Claudia Cardinale as Angelica; Lancaster with a tailor on set; Garibaldi’s redshirts; costumes for The Leopard were designed by Piero Tosi and Umberto Tirelli; Lancaster and Cardinale in the film’s ballroom dance scene.

WINGS OF DESIRE

“I always felt throughout the making of WINGS OF DESIRE that the city of Berlin was carrying the film, the city had sort of co-invented the story…

“Then, of course, two years later it became a whole different city… I realized I had just caught it in the nick of time, that strange, legendary island of a city that had made Berlin unique for thirty years.” — Wim Wenders

A new 4K restoration of WINGS OF DESIRE—the 1987 masterpiece written by Wenders and Peter Handke and directed by Wenders—will play this week at the Aero, presented by the American Cinematheque.

The film was a late-80s phenomenon, attended multiple times by artists, writers, students, and film buffs during its extended runs in large cities and university towns across the country.

WINGS OF DESIRE

Friday, January 25, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top:

Solveig Dommartin in Wing of Desire.

Bruno Ganz.

Crime & the City Solution perform “Six Bells Chime.”

Peter Falk.

Ganz.

Images courtesy Wim Wenders Stiftung.

GODARD ENCORE AT THE AERO

A sequel of sorts to the recent American Cinematheque series For the Love of Godard arrives this weekend at the Aero.

CONTEMPT (Le Mépris) and ALPHAVILLE will screen, as well as 35mm prints of LE PETIT SOLDAT and MADE IN U.S.A.Anna Karina’s last film for Jean-Luc Godard, featuring a cameo by Marianne Faithfull.

And if you missed last year’s MOCA screening of ONE PLUS ONE—Godard’s documentary incorporating the Rolling Stone’s “Sympathy for the Devil” recording sessions—it will be at the Aero Sunday night.

(The Cinematheque’s exclusive run of Godard’s new film THE IMAGE BOOKLe livre d’imagecommences Friday, February 15.)

CONTEMPT and LE PETIT SOLDAT

Friday, January 18, at 7:30 pm.

ALPHAVILLE and MADE IN U.S.A.

Saturday, January 19, at 7:30

ONE PLUS ONE

Sunday, January 20, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Top: Michel Piccoli (left), Fritz Lang, Jack Palance, and Jean-Luc Godard, on the set of Contempt (1963).

Above: Anna Karina in Alphaville (1965).

Below: Brigitte Bardot and Piccoli in Contempt.

Image credit: Rialto Pictures.

LUKAS DHONT’S GIRL

“Placing social value on concepts like authenticity is an invitation to manufacture them.” — Louis Menand*

The initial controversy over Lukas Dhont’s acclaimed debut feature GIRL—the story of a young, transgender ballet dancer in Belgium—focused on the casting of a then-14-year-old cisgender actor (Victor Polster, as Lara) in a transgender lead role.

Nora Monsecour—the woman Lara is based on—worked closely with the director and has enthusiastically endorsed Polster’s performance:

“In one of our first conversations, I said to Lukas that I didn’t care at all if the actor was male, female, transgender, lesbian, gay. For me, it was very important that Lara… be played by someone who had a lot of love and empathy for the character, [and] was also a very good dancer. When I saw pictures of Victor, I thought to myself, ‘this is it, he is it.’ ”

Since the film’s release in Europe, some but not all critics in the transgender community have gone further, dismissing the film as dangerous “trauma porn” and worse.

The film was a triumph this year at Un Certain Regard at Cannes, winning a Caméra d’Or for Dhont and best actor for Polster. The great Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui choreographed the dances for the film.

This week the American Cinematheque presents GIRL as part of its Golden Globe Foreign-Language Nominees series.

 

GIRL

Tuesday, January 1, at 5 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

GIRL streams on Netflix from January 18.

 

*Louis Menand, “Faking It,” The New Yorker, December 10, 2018, 69.

Victor Polster (top, foreground left) in Girl. Image credit: Netflix.

CHRIS MARKER — LE FOND DE L’AIR EST ROUGE

“Political or critical or academic subcultures and avant-gardes—with their armatures of highly localized and professionalized expertise, their demand that we laboriously teach ourselves to gaze askance—are pretty often choked up with panics about self-justification, the fear that curiosity and the free play of the imagination will somehow lure us haplessly away from our supposed higher goals.

“This is where I connect with Chris Marker: he isn’t afraid of curiosity. His is an avant-garde that goes out into the world, open to the unexpected encounter.” — Mark Sinker, Film Quarterly

Narrated by, among others, Simone Signoret and Yves MontandLE FOND DE L’AIR EST ROUGE (1977)—Chris Marker’s essay film on the rise and disintegration in the 1960s and ’70s of the New Left in Europe, Asia, and the Americas—will screen in 35mm this weekend in an American Cinematheque presentation in Santa Monica.

LE FOND DE L’AIR EST ROUGE never substitutes anti-establishment piety for Establishment piety. Marker’s commitment is of a fiercely independent, insubordinate, individualistic kind… There is, I think, a fellow-travelling dilemma constantly in play in this film (notwithstanding its worn-on-the-sleeve sympathy for left unity): How to speak out against tyranny without the dull and heavy jargon of, for example, post-structuralist theories of ideology whose language is nearly as alienating and infuriating—and as inaccessible to a nonspecialist audience—as the awful, monotonous management-speak we hear being born in the mouth of a Citroën technocrat?” — Rob White, Film Quarterly

LE FOND DE L’AIR EST ROUGE

(A GRIN WITHOUT A CAT)

Sunday, October 7, at 7:30.

Aero Theatre, 1328 Montana Avenue.

Scenes from Le Fond de l’air est rouge/A Grin without a Cat.