Tag Archives: American Cinematheque

ELIO PETRI — THE 10TH VICTIM

In THE 10TH VICTIM, the great Italian director Elio Petri sets his characteristic socio-political critique amid sci-fi thrills and an explosion of mid-sixties glamour—courtesy of production designer Piero Poletto and iconic stars Ursula Andress and Marcello Mastroianni.

The populace of Rome, ensconced in an Op-art wonderland, compete for televised fame and fortune in a legal game of hunter and hunted—themes borrowed by The Hunger Games nearly half a century later.

Gianni Di Venanzo—who, like Poletto, worked with Antonioni—was the film’s cinematographer. Tonino Guerra, Giorgio Salvioni, and Ennio Flaiano wrote the screenplay with Petri, and Piero Piccioni composed the propulsive score.

This weekend, the American Cinematheque, the Art Directors Guild Film Society, and The Hollywood Reporter present a rare local screening of THE 10TH VICTIM, followed by a panel discussion with Frances Anderton—host of KCRW‘s DnA: Design and ArchitectureUSC professor Nicholas J. Cull, and production designers Guy Hendrix Dyas and John Muto.

THE 10TH VICTIM

Sunday, May 19, at 5:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Ursula Andress and Marcello Mastroianni in The 10th Victim (1965), directed by Elio Petri, production design by Piero Poletto. Elsa Martinelli on phone (fourth from top).

PASOLINI AT THE AERO

Ahead of the belated Los Angeles release of Abel Ferrara‘s ingenious Pasolini biopic, the American Cinematheque and Luce Cinecittà celebrate the great Italian filmmaker in the program The Passion of Pier Paolo Pasolini.

The director—a radical public intellectual who embraced a vivid cinematic treatment of fable-into-allegory as a means to circulate his poetry to a wider audience—made twelve features before his death at age 53. Nine of them will screen at the Aero, all in 35mm.

Pasolini’s epic “Trilogy of Life” is here—THE DECAMERON, THE CATERBURY TALES, and ARABIAN NIGHTS—as well as his earlier mythology series: OEDIPUS REX, TEOREMA, MEDEA (with Maria Callas), and the rarely screened PIGSTY, starring Pierre Clémenti and Jean-Pierre Léaud.

The retrospective will open with SALÒ—Pasolini’s polarizing take on Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom—and close with perhaps the most straightforward Christ-story ever told, THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW (1964).

SALÒ and PIGSTY

Thursday, May 16, at 7:30 pm.

THE DECAMERON and OEDIPUS REX

Friday, May 17, at 7:30 pm.

THE CANTERBURY TALES and TEOREMA

Saturday, May 18, at 7:30 pm.

ARABIAN NIGHTS and MEDEA

Sunday, May 19, at 7:30 pm.

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW

Monday, May 20, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Pier Paolo Pasolini, from top: The Decameron; Silvana Mangano and Terence Stamp in Teorema (2); Maria Callas and Pasolini (right) in 1969 on the set of Medea; Pierre Clémenti in Pigsty; Pier Paolo Pasolini, Trilogia della vita, edited by Giorgio Gattei (Bologna: Cappelli, 1975), still from Arabian Nights on the cover, courtesy and © Cappelli; Pasolini as Geoffrey Chaucer in The Canterbury Tales, reading Boccaccio’s Il Decameron; Salò.

ASSAYAS DOUBLE BILL AT THE AERO

To mark the release of NON-FICTION—the new film from Olivier Assayas—the American Cinematheque presents a double feature of Assayas’ 1996 cult film IRMA VEP and a 35mm presentation of his 2008 masterpiece SUMMER HOURS. Both screen on Thursday.

NON-FICTION will screen the following night.

IRMA VEP and SUMMER HOURS

Thursday, May 2, at 7:30 pm.

NON-FICTION

Friday, May 3, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Maggie Cheung in Irma Vep; Jérémie Renier (left) and Olivier Assayas on set, Summer Hours; Édith Scob and Juliette Binoche in Summer Hours; Renier, Dominique Reymond, and Charles Berling in Summer Hours; Jean-Pierre Léaud (right) and Cheung in Irma Vep.

MIKE LEIGH — THE EARLY YEARS

The early film and television work of Mike Leigh extended so-called “kitchen sink realism” into the Thatcher era, and no one examined the decimation of Britain’s working class in the 1980s with the rigor and humor of Leigh in Meantime, High Hopes, and Life is Sweet.

Leigh reached an artistic apotheosis of sorts in 1993 with Naked, and an breakthrough in the United States with his follow-up Secrets & Lies (1996).

In their weekend series Bleak But Never Boring—Life According to Mike Leigh, the American Cinematheque brings these defining films to the Aero for three double-feature programs.

NAKED and MEANTIME

Friday, April 5, at 7:30 pm.

SECRETS & LIES and VERA DRAKE

Saturday, April 6, at 7:30 pm.

LIFE IS SWEET and HIGH HOPES

Sunday, April 7, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Tim Roth in Meantime (1983); Marianne Jean-Baptiste and Timothy Spall in Secrets & Lies (1996); David Thewlis in Naked (1993); Ruth Sheen and Phil Davis in High Hopes (1988); Jane Horrocks in Life is Sweet(1990).

MIKE LEIGH IN LOS ANGELES

Mike Leigh—England’s greatest living filmmaker—will be in Los Angeles to present his new film PETERLOO, the story of events leading up to the Peterloo Massacre in Manchester, an event that forever changed Great Britain’s electoral system and journalistic practice.

Following an American Cinematheque screening to launch its upcoming retrospective Bleak But Never Boring: Life According to Mike Leigh, the director will participate in a conversation moderated by Jim Hemphill.

PETERLOO

Monday, April 1, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1321 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Peterloo (2019), directed by Mike Leigh. Images courtesy Cornerstone Films.