Tag Archives: American Cinematheque

TOKYO STORY

If, in our century, something sacred still existed, if there were something like a sacred treasure of the cinema, then for me that would have to be the work of Yasujiro Ozu… Never before and never again since has the cinema been so close to its essence and its purpose: to present an image of man in our century, a usable, true and valid image in which he not only recognizes himself, but from which, above all, he may learn about himself. — Wim Wenders

Ozu’s TOKYO STORY—starring the great Setsuko Hara and voted the “greatest film of all time” in a 2012 Sight & Sound poll—will screen this week at the Aero as part of the American Cinematheque’s new Tuesday Matinee series.

TOKYO STORY

Tuesday, August 20, at 1 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Yasujiro Ozu, Tokyo Story, from top: cast; Chishû Ryû (left) and Setsuko Hara; Chieko Higashiyama and Hara; Sô Yamamura (left) and Haruko Sugimura; Hara and Ryû; cast.

KIAROSTAMI AT THE AERO

The touring retrospective of the films of Abbas Kiarostami is here. A Taste of Kiarostami—presented by the American Cinematheque at the Aero in Santa Monica over the next four days—opens with a double bill of LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE (2012, shot in Japan) and the director’s last work 24 FRAMES (2017).

On Friday and Saturday TASTE OF CHERRY (winner of the Palme d’Or in 1997), TEN (2002), the fictional documentary CLOSE-UP (1990), and THE WIND WILL CARRY US (1999) will screen.

The retrospective will close with a trilogy of films set in the Iranian village of Koker—a matinee program beginning at 2 pm.

A series of Kiasrostami shorts—chiefly from the 1970s—will play each day before the features, and on opening night the director’s son Ahmad Kiarostami will be on hand to introduce the screening.

LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE and 24 FRAMES—AHMAD KIAROSTAMI IN PERSON

Thursday, August 8, at 7:30 pm.

TASTE OF CHERRY and TEN

Friday, August 9, at 7:30 pm.

CLOSE-UP and THE WIND WILL CARRY US

Saturday, August 10, at 7:30 pm.

WHERE IS THE FRIEND’S HOUSE?, AND LIFE GOES ON, and THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES

Sunday, August 11, at 2 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Los Angeles.

Abbas Kiarostami, from top: Taste of Cherry; Ten; The Wind Will Carry Us; Like Someone in Love; from the Koker Trilogy; Kiarostami in the 1990s, photograph by Everett; Close-Up; 24 Frames. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker’s estate, the performers, the photographers, IFC Films, and Janus Films.

GAINSBOURG’S JE T’AIME MOI NON PLUS

This week, La Collectionneuse and the American Cinematheque present the 4K restoration of Serge Gainsbourg’s 1976 film JE T’AIME MOI NON PLUS, its first Los Angeles screening in many years. Starring Jane Birkin, Joe Dallesandro, and Hugues Quester, this truck-stop triangle was the first of only two features films Gainsbourg directed.

“Serge is the one who approached me. [Jane and Serge] were great people. Just a great couple that were truly a couple. They were fun to be with. It was really difficult to shoot a film where your love interest is the wife of the man who’s directing it. The film had to be erotic and I had to be very cool. I was doing multiplication tables in my head the whole time. But I loved both of them very much. They were very special people…

“[JE T’AIME MOI NON PLUS] was ahead of its time. I thought the public was gonna be ready for that kind of story. I thought it’d have been a nice success if they’d released it back then. But they weren’t giving Serge the kind of play he wanted.” — Joe Dallesandro

  JE T’AIME MOI NON PLUS

Wednesday, July 24, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Jane Birkin and Joe Dallesandro in Je t’aime moi non plus, with Hugues Quester (third from top, right) and director Serge Gainsbourg (fourth from top, center, on raft, and sixth from top, second from right).

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE

This week in Hollywood, Kalyane Lévy’s La Collectionneuse will screen the film her program is named for.

Co-presented by Women & Film and the American Cinematheque, Éric Rohmer’s LA COLLECTIONNEUSE (1967) is one of his beloved contes moraux, and stars Haydée Politoff, Patrick Bauchau, and Daniel Pommereulle.

Stay for post-screening drinks and music, with a DJ set by DJ Izella.

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE

Friday, June 21, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Haydée Politoff and Patrick Bauchau in La Collectionneuse.

ELIO PETRI — THE 10TH VICTIM

In THE 10TH VICTIM, the great Italian director Elio Petri sets his characteristic socio-political critique amid sci-fi thrills and an explosion of mid-sixties glamour—courtesy of production designer Piero Poletto and iconic stars Ursula Andress and Marcello Mastroianni.

The populace of Rome, ensconced in an Op-art wonderland, compete for televised fame and fortune in a legal game of hunter and hunted—themes borrowed by The Hunger Games nearly half a century later.

Gianni Di Venanzo—who, like Poletto, worked with Antonioni—was the film’s cinematographer. Tonino Guerra, Giorgio Salvioni, and Ennio Flaiano wrote the screenplay with Petri, and Piero Piccioni composed the propulsive score.

This weekend, the American Cinematheque, the Art Directors Guild Film Society, and The Hollywood Reporter present a rare local screening of THE 10TH VICTIM, followed by a panel discussion with Frances Anderton—host of KCRW‘s DnA: Design and ArchitectureUSC professor Nicholas J. Cull, and production designers Guy Hendrix Dyas and John Muto.

THE 10TH VICTIM

Sunday, May 19, at 5:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Ursula Andress and Marcello Mastroianni in The 10th Victim (1965), directed by Elio Petri, production design by Piero Poletto. Elsa Martinelli on phone (fourth from top).