Tag Archives: American Cinematheque

I LOST MY BODY — JÉRÉMY CLAPIN IN CONVERSATION

Jérémy Clapin will be in town to present his acclaimed animated drama I LOST MY BODY, the point-of-view story of an errant hand and its trip across Paris.

For this free American Cinematheque program, the director will also participate in a post-screening discussion of his work.

I LOST MY BODY—JÉRÉMY CLAPIN

Wednesday, January 29, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Jérémy Clapin, I Lost My Body / J’ai perdu mon corps (2019). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker and Netflix.

MEPHISTO AT THE EGYPTIAN

Adapted from the roman à clef by Klaus Mann (son of Thomas), MEPHISTO—directed by István Szabó and based on Gustaf Gründgens, the great German actor, extreme political opportunist, and Klaus’ former brother-in-law—traces the simultaneous rise and fall of Hendrik Höfgen, a leftist thespian (played by Klaus Maria Brandauer) who becomes the toast of Nazi Berlin for his portrayal of Goethe ’s Mephistopheles.

“In the energy they bring to the film, Brandauer and Szabó have made a mighty statement, but it is as much about acting, I think, as Nazism. In Höfgen, we see an empty man, standing for nothing. This doesn’t even bother him.” — Roger Ebert

This week at the Egyptian, the American Cinematheque and Kino Lorber present a screening of the 4K restoration of MEPHISTO—winner of the Academy Award for Best-Foreign Language film—on a double bill with the 4K restoration of Szabó’s Silver Bear winner CONFIDENCE (1980).

MEPHISTO and CONFIDENCE

Friday, January 24, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

István Szabó, Mephisto (1981), from top: Klaus Maria Brandauer (6). Poster is from East German release. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographers, and Kino Lorber.

MARTIN SCORSESE AND ROBERT DE NIRO AT THE EGYPTIAN

THE IRISHMAN actually started about thirty-five years ago with the idea of the remake of The Bad and the Beautiful and the sequel Two Weeks in Another Town. Somehow we exhausted that. And so when [Robert De Niro] came across this story and gave it to me, he said: “You know, this is an amazing part for Joe, if he wants to do it.” And also for Al Pacino—and I never worked with Al all these years, you know? We just knew that they were right for it. And then we looked at each other and realized we were meant for this somehow. It’s not necessarily a culmination, but a sense of contemplation of where we are, near the end of our lives. — Martin Scorsese

To open the American Cinematheque series The Films of Marty and Bob, Scorsese and De Niro will participate in a full discussion about forty-five years of cinematic collaboration, followed by a screening of their latest masterpiece THE IRISHMAN.

MARTIN SCORSESE and ROBERT DE NIRO IN CONVERSATION—THE IRISHMAN

Saturday, January 4, at 6 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Martin Scorsese, The Irishman (2019), from top: Joe Pesci (left) and Robert De Niro; De Niro, Al Pacino, and Ray Romano; Kathrine Narducci (left) and Stephanie Kurtzuba; U.S. film poster; De Niro and Bobby Cannavale (foreground right); De Niro, Pesci, and Lucy Gallina. Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the actors, the photographers, and Netflix.

ADAM DRIVER AT THE EGYPTIAN

Adam Driver will be at the Egyptian Theatre this weekend for a between-film conversation. The American Cinematheque presentation on Sunday of Noah Baumbach’s acclaimed MARRIAGE STORY and Jim Jarmusch’s underseen gem PATERSON begins at 7:30 pm, with Driver taking the stage shortly before 10.

MARRIAGE STORY and PATERSON

Sunday, December 15, at 7:30.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Adam Driver in Paterson (2016); Scarlett Johansson and Driver in Marriage Story (2019) (2); U.S. poster for Paterson; Driver and Golshifteh Farahani in Paterson; Driver in Marriage Story. Images courtesy and © the filmmakers, the actors, the photographers, Netflix (Marriage Story) and Amazon Studios (Paterson).

VARDA BY AGNÈS

Three words are important to me: inspiration, creation, and sharing… I don’t care if my films make money. I care that my films are seen and are loved. Agnès Varda

“My mother was very funny—left wing but not politically correct. We traveled a lot together. She was so curious and she loved gossip. Qui baise qui?

“Agnès was 89 when we started VARDA BY AGNÈS. She had lung cancer and we could only work three hours a day. This film was so difficult, going from the editing room to the hospital to the editing room…

“My mother would say, Don’t complain too much. Do it. We work hard, but it should look easy. We should not show the ‘work.’ Rosalie Varda, Agnès’ daughter and a co-producer of VARDA BY AGNÈS, in conversation with Ava DuVernay*

Agnès Varda didn’t like or use the word “master” to refer to herself or her work—what she called her cinéma écriture—but VARDA BY AGNÈS, her final film, is undeniably a master class in cinema, and a “characteristically playful, profound, and personal summation of the director’s own brilliant career.”

Now playing at the Aero Theatre, these American Cinematheque screenings of VARDA BY AGNÈS will be introduced by a variety of guests, including Illeana Douglas, Julie Delpy, Chloe King, Lisa Blok-Linson, Lynne Littman, Jim McBride, and Peter Debruge. See link below for details.

Later this month, VARDA BY AGNÈS opens at the Laemmle Glendaleand Playhouse.

VARDA BY AGNÈS

Through December 11.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From December 20:

Glendale

207 North Maryland Avenue, Glendale.

Saturday and Sunday, December 21 and 22, 10:10 am.

Playhouse

673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

*Rosalie Varda and Ava DuVernay in conversation, Array 360° Film Series, November 2, 2019, Array Campus, Los Angeles.

From top: Agnès Varda on the set of Uncle Yanco (1967); Varda, behind camera, shooting her first feature La Pointe court (1955); Silvia Monfort and Philippe Noiret in La Pointe court; Alain Resnais and Varda editing the film; Corinne Marchand, Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962); Le Bonheur (1965); Varda, Visages Villages (2017), co-directed by Varda and JR; Varda and Jean “Yanco” Varda, Uncle Yanco; Kathleen Cleaver in Black Panthers (1968); James Rado (left), Viva, and Gerome Ragni in Lions Love (…and Lies) (1969); Varda by Agnès (2019) (2); Jeanne Moreau (left), Hanna Schygulla, and Michel Piccoli (as Simon Cinéma) in One Hundred and One Nights (1995); 72nd Festival de Cannes tribute poster, 2019; Varda by Agnès. Images courtesy and © Ciné Tamaris, MK2, Criterion, and Janus Films.