Tag Archives: Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again

J. HOBERMAN — NO MISTAKES

The radical filmmaking practice of Andy Warhol within the context of the work of Oscar Micheaux and Orson Welles is the subject of a lecture by J. Hoberman this weekend.

Hoberman—a contributor to Artforum and The Nation—was a film critic for The Village Voice for over thirty years.

J. HOBERMAN—NO MISTAKES

ANDY WARHOL’S NEW HISTORY OF CINEMA

Sunday, February 3, at 4 pm.

Whitney Museum of American Art

Hess Gallery and Theater

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

From top: Andy Warhol, Sleep (1963), film still (John Giorno); Oscar Micheaux, Within Our Gates (1920), film still; Orson Welles, The Lady from Shanghai (1947), film still (Welles and Rita Hayworth).

JILL JOHNSTON DANCING

In 1963 and 1964, Andy Warhol captured dancer-choreographers Lucinda Childs, Yvonne Rainer, and Freddy Herko, and Village Voice dance critic Jill Johnston with his Bolex—performing in lofts, on rooftops, and at Judson.

These cinematic time capsules will be screened this weekend and next at the Whitney, and in early December at MOMA.

The films include Jill Johnston Dancing, Freddy Herko, Jill and Freddy Dancing, Lucinda Childs, and Shoulder.

 

DO IT YOURSELF—WARHOL AS BALLETOMANE

Saturday, November 17, at 7 pm.

Friday, November 23, at 2 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

 

ANDY WARHOL AT JUDSON

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30.

Saturday, December 8, at 4:30 pm.

JUDSON DANCE THEATER—THE WORK IS NEVER DONE

Through February 3.

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

Above: Andy WarholJill Johnston Dancing, 1964.

Below: Andy Warhol, Jill and Freddy Dancing, 1963.

Image credit: © 2018 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved.

IRVING BLUM IN CONVERSATION

“Warhol didn’t make a mark on American culture. He became the instrument with which American culture designated itself.” — Peter Schjeldahl

In conjunction with the Whitney show ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN, Irving Blum—whose Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles was the first to exhibit Warhol’s post-advertising artwork, the Campbell’s soup-can paintings—will talk about working with the artist.

Blum will be joined by Bob ColacelloInterview editor throughout the 1970s—and Vincent Fremont, the former executive manager of Warhol’s studio and a co-founder of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Exhibition curator Donna De Salvo will moderate the conversation.

MY LIFE WITH WARHOL

Friday, November 16, at 6:30 pm.

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

Through March 31.

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York City.

From top:

Andy Warhol, Irving Blum, Polaroid.

Andy Warhol, from the Campbell’s Soup Can series, 1962. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol’s Exposures (1979), edited by Bob Colacello.

Warhol (left) and Irving Blum.