Tag Archives: Andy Warhol

SYLVIA

“Sylvia’s best friends are her boyfriends. They’re always handsome, young, and unemployed. They follow her. Sylvia doesn’t follow anybody.

“The most famous thing Sylvia ever did was throw a plate of spaghetti, brie cheese, and salad on John Simon’s head. She was furious at him for calling her ‘a party girl and gate crasher’ in one of his reviews. She said, ‘Take that! Now you can call me a plate crasher too!’

“Sylvia never crashes parties, but she is a party girl. During the 1977 Democratic primary in New York a reporter asked Sylvia how she could go to a Bella Abzug fundraiser one night and a Mario Cuomo fundraiser the next. Sylvia replied, ‘I’m not for any candidate. I’m for the party.’

“Sylvia goes to at least three parties a night. One for cocktails, one for dinner, and one for dessert. One night she arrived at her dessert party and a big black waiter asked her if she’d like a cup of coffee. Sylvia said yes and the waiter asked, ‘How do you take your coffee, Miss Miles?’

” ‘I like my coffee the way I like my men,’ said Sylvia, eyeing the waiter up and down.

” ‘I’m sorry, Miss Miles,’ the waiter said, ‘But we don’t have any gay coffee.’ ” — Andy Warhol*

Sylvia Miles, who died on June 12, costarred with Joe Dallesandro in Andy Warhol’s Heat, and was nominated for Best Supporting Actress twice: for seven minutes of work in Midnight Cowboy (1969), and five minutes of work in Farewell, My Lovely (1975).

*Andy Warhol’s Exposures, edited by Bob Colacello (New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1979), 176.

From top: Sylvia Miles and Joe Dallesandro, publicity still for Andy Warhol’s Heat; Miles and Tennessee Williams; Vieux Carré poster for London production; Miles and Dallesandro on set, Heat; Warhol (left), Miles, Geneviève Waïte, and Bob Colacello, 1974, photograph by William E. Sauro; Miles and Dallesandro in Heat.

PARKETT — PHOTO

Parkett presents PHOTO, “the first survey exhibition of all photographic works made by artists for the journal over the last three decades. On view at Parkett’s Zurich space, the show includes some ninety works spanning a rarely seen, vast, and diverse range of photographic positions and ideas.”*

“The exhibition follows the evolution of photographic methods in the past three decades, with many of the earlier photographs making use of analog techniques, while digital editing informs the more recent works. Common threads including people and portraiture, landscapes both urban and natural, everyday objects, and abstraction, connect an otherwise expansive range of visual topics.”*

“Many of the works on view combine photographic elements with other media, such as gouache, collage, textiles, installation, or printmaking. Also on view are works, which while similar in terms of media and format, are unique and contain distinct differences within each project. Further exhibition displays include five video works, as well as a selection of artists’ inserts—the specially commissioned 10–12 book page projects published in each issue of Parkett.”*

“You can grab an issue from thirty years ago and see the context. You can grab that context and time. The internet has no historical orientation. You click on an article and you don’t know what context [it was published in]. I think this loss of memory is deplorable.” — Jacqueline Burckhardt, Parkett co-founding editor**

PHOTO

THE FIRST SURVEY OF ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS MADE BY ARTISTS FOR PARKETT SINCE 1984*

Through September 28.

Parkett Space Zürich

Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

**See “Time, Context, Object—The Parkett Story,” PARIS LA 16 (2018).

PHOTO artists include: Tomma Abts, Franz Ackermann, Doug Aitken, Allora/Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Ed Atkins, John Baldessari, Yto Barrada, Vanessa Beecroft, Alighiero e Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Maurizio Cattelan, Chuck Close, Tacita Dean, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Trisha Donnelly, Tracey Emin, Omer Fast, Robert Frank, Katharina Fritsch, Cyprien Gaillard, Ellen Gallagher, Adrian Ghenie, Gilbert & George, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, David Hammons, Rachel Harrison, Christian Jankowski, Annette Kelm, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Jannis Kounellis, Lee Kit, Zoe Leonard, Liu Xiaodong, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Tracey Moffatt, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Gabriel Orozco, Richard Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, RH Quaytman, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Pipilotti Rist, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Thomas Ruff, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Gregor Schneider, Shirana Shahbazi, Cindy Sherman, Roman Signer, Dayanita Singh, Hito Steyerl, Beat Streuli, Thomas Struth, Sturtevant, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Rosemarie Trockel, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, Charline von Heyl, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Wool, and Yang Fudong.

Parkett editions, from top: Doug Aitken, Decrease the Mass and Run like Hell, 1999, for Parkett 57; Vanessa Beecroft, untitled, 1999, for Parkett 56; Andy Warhol, untitled, 1987, for Parkett 12, 1987; David Hammons, Money Tree, 1992, for Parkett 31; Wolfgang Tillmans, Parkett edition 1992–1998, for Parkett 53; Trisha Donnelly, The Dashiell Delay, 2006 (2), for Parkett 77; Shirana Shahbazi, Composition with Mountain, 2014, for Parkett 94; Sigmar Polke, Desastres und andere bare Wunder, 1982–1984, for Parkett 2; Cindy Sherman, untitled, 1991, for Parkett 29; Jannis Kounellis, untitled, 1985, for Parkett 6; Tracey Emin, Self-Portrait, 12.11.01, for Parkett 63; Franz Ackermann, Peak Season, 2003, for Parkett 68. Images courtesy and © the artists and Parkett.


WARHOL ON BASQUIAT

Andy Warhol’s last years were often spent in the company of his friend and collaborator Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The new book Warhol on Basquiat—edited by Michael Dayton Hermann—looks at this relationship through Warhol’s photographs, archival media, excerpts from Warhol’s diaries, and examples of the artworks they created together.

WARHOL ON BASQUIAT: THE ICONIC RELATIONSHIP TOLD IN ANDY WARHOL’S WORDS AND PICTURES (Cologne: Taschen, 2019).

From top: Jean Michel and Andy at The Rockefeller Center, September 19, 1985, photograph; Jean Michel outside the Mary Boone Gallery on West Broadway, March 9, 1985, photograph; Andy and Jean Michel painting Problems at Andy’s studio at 860 Broadway, March 27, 1984, photograph; page layouts from Warhol on Basquiat (3); book cover; Jean Michel painting Untitled at Andy’s studio at 860 Broadway, April 16, 1984, photograph. Images courtesy and © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. and Taschen.

IF THE DANCER DANCES

“The beauty of dance… is that it gets passed from one body, one soul, to another. There’s something so beautiful, so precious about that. It comes out of the body, it goes into the air, and then it disappears.” — Stephen Petronio

In the afterglow of the Merce Cunningham—Night of 100 Solos events, the immersive new documentary IF THE DANCER DANCES tells a different Cunningham story: the 2015 restaging of the choreographer’s RainForest by the Stephen Petronio Company.

The sexual quality and hint of narrative in this 1968 dance—with music by David Tudor, costumes by Jasper Johns, and décor by Andy Warhol (the silver, helium-filled pillows)—create an atmosphere distinct from almost every other Cunningham work. The challenge for the stagers—and Cunningham company veterans—Andrea Weber, Meg Harper, and Rashaun Mitchell is replacing the continuous-movement ethos of the Petronio dancers with Cunningham’s non-momentum aesthetic. As the film demonstrates, how to do this is perhaps a subject of dispute:

“The focus needs to be exactly on what you’re doing, and not on an image of anything.” — Meg Harper

RainForest… transcended pure movement… [The dancers] need to hear images that might help them.” — Gus Solomons, Jr., Cunningham company veteran

IF THE DANCER DANCES—directed by Lise Friedman and Maia Wechsler—mixes extensive performance and interview footage of Petronio’s dancers and their teachers with scenes of Cunningham rehearsals from the 1960s. This essential document of modern dance making and Cunningham’s philosophy and practice is playing around town through May 9.

IF THE DANCER DANCES

Through May 9.

Q & A with former Cunningham dancers following 3 pm show on May 4.

Music Hall

9036 Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills.

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Monday and Tuesday, May 6 and 7.

Q & A with former Cunningham dancers following 7:30 pm show on May 6.

Royal

11523 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

Playhouse 7

673 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena.

From top: Nicholas Sciscione and Davalois Fearon in If the Dancer Dances, performing Merce Cunningham ‘s RainForest; Jaqlin Medlock and Sciscione rehearsing RainForest; Meg Harper (center) with Fearon in rehearsal, Gino Grenek behind Foster; Stephen Petronio Company, Grenek, Fearon, and Sciscione, RainForest performance, Joyce Theater, April 2015, photograph by Yi-Chun Wu, image © 2015 and courtesy the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and the photographer; Stephen Petronio. Film stills courtesy of Monument Releasing. Below: Merce Cunningham in RainForest, 1968, photograph by Martha Keller, courtesy of the Merce Cunningham Trust.

WARHOL WOMEN AT LÉVY GORVY

Forty-two paintings of women by Andy Warhol—including portraits of Gertrude Stein, Ethel Scull, Liza Minnelli, Dolly Parton, Golda Meir, Debbie Harry, Marilyn Monroe, and the artist’s mother Julia Warhola—are now on view at Lévy Gorvy in Manhattan.

In a silver-tin-foil-covered room in the gallery, a selection of Warhol’s 1964–1966 Screen Test shorts will play on a loop. Among the artist’s subjects for these 3-minute films were Yoko Ono, Edie Sedgwick, Marisa Berenson, Barbara Rubin, Amy Taubin, Susan Sontag, Niki de Saint Phalle, Cass Elliott, Donyale Luna, Holly Solomon, Maureen Tucker, and Nico.

“I don’t think I’ve ever met a collector today who is in between, let’s say, 25 to 65 [years old] who will tell me, ‘I won’t collect Warhol,’ and I don’t know that about any other artist… Our great-grandchildren will still be collecting Warhol more than many of the artists that are more pricey today.” — Dominique Lévy

WARHOL WOMEN

Through June 15.

Lévy Gorvy

909 Madison Avenue (at 73rd Street), New York City.

Andy Warhol, from top: Judy Garland (Multicolor), 1978, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; Wilhelmina Ross, from the series Ladies and Gentlemen, circa 1974–1975; Triple Mona Lisa, 1964, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; Kimiko Powers, 1972, acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas; Aretha Franklin, 1986, synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas; Red Jackie, 1964, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, photograph courtesy Froehlich Collection, Stuttgart. Images © 2019 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Paintings photographed by Tim Nighswander, courtesy Lévy Gorvy.