Tag Archives: Andy Warhol

LUPE

LUPE (1965)—the last feature Edie Sedgwick shot for Andy Warhol—features his most notorious superstar playing herself in an art-meets-life portrayal of Lupe Vélez, the stage and screen actress known as the “Mexican Spitfire” who died at age 36 after an overdose of Seconal and brandy. (Edie made it to age 28.)

The film—a double-screen projection—co-stars Factory regular Billy Name and will screen this week at USC.

LUPE

Wednesday, March 27, at 7:30 pm.

Ray Stark Theatre

George Lucas Building, USC

900 West 34th Street, Los Angeles.

Edie Sedgwick in Lupe, © Andy Warhol Museum, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, all rights reserved.

SORRY ANGEL

In the art-for-art’s-sake world of Christophe Honoré and his characters—gay men in love with love and the legends of representation that give their at-risk lives sense, sensibility, and station—matters of love, life, death are navigated through a filter of literature and performance, and this combination of high art and pop sentimentality brings solace.

In PLAIRE, AIMER ET COURIR VITE / SORRY ANGEL—now playing at the Nuart—the brief 1990s encounter of Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps) and Arthur (Vincent Lacoste) is haunted by the long shadows and quotations of some of the writers Honoré recently celebrated in his stage piece Les IdolesBernard-Marie Koltès, Hervé Guibert—supplemented by queer icons and allies Jean Genet, Isabelle Huppert, Robert Wilson, Walt Whitman, W.H. Auden, David Hockney, Andy Warhol, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Jacques, not willing to undergo yet another course of AIDS treatment, is reaching the end of his story just as Arthur—like Honoré, a transplant from the provinces—is beginning his. With a little help from his idols, Jacques can put Arthur on the path to become a proper young Parisian.

SORRY ANGEL

Through March 21.

Nuart Theatre

11272 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Los Angeles.

From top: Pierre Deladonchamps (foreground) and Vincent Lacoste in Sorry Angel; Deladonchamps; Deladonchamps and Lacoste; Lacoste.

K8 HARDY’S OUTFITUMENTARY

“A record of the way a young lesbian feminist dressed in her coming of age” — K8 Hardy

K8 Hardy’s directorial debut OUTFITUMENTARY (2016) will screen this week as part of the Jason Simon series Blame the Audience at MOCA.

Also on the bill: If Andy Warhol’s Super-8 Camera Could Talk, directed by Roddy Bogawa, and Tiger Morse, directed by Warhol.

OUTFITUMENTARY

Thursday, March 7, at 6 pm.

MOCA Grand Avenue

250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: K8 Hardy, Outfitumentary, still; Andy Warhol, Tiger Morse, aka Tiger Morse (Reel 14 of ****), still; K8 Hardy, How To: Untitled Runway Show book cover, published by DoPe Press in 2013, cover design by Madame Paris.

KARL LAGERFELD

“I was once a professor at the College of Applied Art in Vienna. In the short period in which I lectured, I realized that I had absolutely no educational fiber whatsoever, that I wasn’t interested in my students. Without being egotistical, what I do is make things. Explaining it to others is not my thing at all. I’m a battlefield person. And generals don’t necessarily make a good minister of war.” — Karl Lagerfeld

“It is with deep sadness that the House of Chanel announces the passing of Karl Lagerfeld, the Creative Director for the Chanel Fashion House since 1983. Virginie Viard, director of Chanel’s fashion creation studio and Lagerfeld’s closest collaborator for more than thirty years, has been entrusted by Alain Wertheimer with the creative work for the collections, so that the legacy of Gabrielle Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld can live on.” — Chanel, February 19, 2019

“I love frivolousness. I know a lot of people who would have disappeared long ago had they not been frivolous… I hate it when the gentlemen with their taffeta and scissors take themselves too seriously. I love everything that is transcient. You should never anchor yourself in an epoch. The tale of Romeo and Juliet lasted only one night, and now it’s the symbol of eternal love.” — Karl Lagerfeld

The fashion designer, creative director, photographer, artist, publisher, bibliophile, actor, author, costumer, and aphorist was a cherished contributor to PARIS LA, supporting Chanel’s campaign collaborations over the last ten years, and creating a poster for Issue 5.

“I have no conception of my valuable time. For me, wasting time is the ultimate luxury. For example, if I’m lying on the couch and reading an interesting book when I should be doing something else, maybe that’s wasting time. But the stimulation of a guilty conscience is extremely creative. It’s the spice of life.” — Karl Lagerfeld

Lagerfeld quotes from Deutsch Vogue Dialogues, “Camouflage, Camouflage: Voyeur Karl Lagerfeld in conversation with his friend Gabriele Henkel, an expert on the stage management of life” (originally published in Deutsch Vogue in 1992), edited by Condé Nast Germany (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 2004), 110–114.

From top: Karl Lagerfeld in Paris, Grand Palais, July 2018; young Lagerfeld in Paris; Lagerfeld with Donna Jordan (left) and Jane Forth in L’Amour (1973), directed by Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey; Lagerfeld in the 1970s; Lagerfeld with Jacques de Bascher, 1970s, photograph © Philippe Heurtault; Yves Saint Laurent and Lagerfeld at the Palace, 1970s; Karl Lagerfeld, photograph from Metamorphoses of an American (Göttingen: Steidl, 2008), his tribute to model Brad Kroenig; Karl Lagerfeld, posters (front and verso) for PARIS LA 5 (Winter 2010–2011); Lagerfeld with Paloma Picasso at Studio 54, photograph by Richard P. Manning.

JOHN GIORNO AT WARHOL DRAWINGS PANEL

A trove of over 150 drawings by Andy Warhol—now on view at the New York Academy of Art—trace nearly four decades of work by the hand of the artist who wanted to be a machine.

This week—in conjunction with ANDY WARHOL: BY HAND—join curator and Warhol associate Vincent Fremont, curator Donna De Salvo, and poet, artist, and Warhol actor John Giorno for a panel discussion on the exhibition, moderated by curator and New York Academy of Art president David Kratz.

ANDY WARHOL: BY HAND—

DRAWINGS 1950s–1980s

JOHN GIORNO, DONNA DE SALVO, and VINCENT FREMONT panel

Monday, February 11, at 6:30 pm.

Exhibition runs through March 10.

New York Academy of Art

111 Franklin Street, New York City.

From top: Andy Warhol, Two Male Heads; Andy Warhol, Self Portrait, 1986 synthetic polymer paint on paper; Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, 1975; Andy Warhol, Serious Girl, circa 1954, ink and graphite on paper. Images courtesy the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS).