Tag Archives: Andy Warhol

BLAKE GOPNIK AND OLIVIA LAING IN CONVERSATION

Blake Gopnik will join Olivia Laing and moderator Charlie Porter for a conversation about Andy Warhol, the subject of Gopnik’s massive new biography and the Tate Modern retrospective that opens this week.

Book signings with Gopnik and Laing will follow the event.

ON WARHOL—BLAKE GOPNIK and OLIVIA LAING

Thursday, March 12, at 6:30 pm.

Starr Cinema—Tate Modern

Bankside, London.

Andy Warhol, from top: Self-Portrait, 1986; Boy with Flowers, 1955–1957; Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975; Blake Gopnik, Warhol: A Life as Art, British edition, courtesy and © 2020 London: Allen Lane/Penguin; Billy Name (left) and Warhol in the Factory, mid-1960s; Debbie Harry, 1980. Images courtesy and © 2020 the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., Artists Right Society, New York, and DACS, London.

MOURNING — ON LOSS AND CHANGE

MOURNING—ON LOSS AND CHANGE, curated by Brigitte Kölle, looks at death and grief through the eyes and works of nearly thirty contemporary artists.

Participants include Bas Jan Ader, Kudjoe Affutu, Khaled Barakeh, Christian Boltanski, Helen Cammock, Anne Collier, Johannes Esper, Sibylle Fendt, Seiichi Furuya, Paul Fusco, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Aslan Ġoisum, Ragnar Kjartansson, Maria Lassnig, Jennifer Loeber, Ataa Oko, Adrian Paci, Philippe Parreno, Susan Philipsz, Greta Rauer, Willem de Rooij, Michael Sailstorfer, Thomas Schütte, Dread Scott, Rein Jelle Terpstra, Rosemarie Trockel, Tilman Walther, and Andy Warhol.

Cammock—recent joint winner of the Turner Prize—makes her German debut with the exhibition, which includes a sound piece produced by Philipsz that “revives the old mourning tradition of keening in the atrium of the Gallery of Contemporary Art.”*

A bilingual exhibition booklet can be viewed here.

MOURNING—ON LOSS AND CHANGE*

Through June 14.

Hamburger Kunsthalle

Glockengiesserwall 5, Hamburg.

Mourning—On Loss and Change, Hamburger Kunsthalle, February 7–June 14, 2020 , from top: Maria Lassnig, Balken im Auge / Trauernde Hände, 1964; Khaled Barakeh, The Untitled Images, 2014; Helen Cammock, Untitled, (If You Won’t Be Touched) Shouting in Whispers, 2017; Seiichi Furuya, Mémoires, 2012; Ragnar Kjartansson, God, 2007; Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968/2019; Andy Warhol, Jackie, 1964; Anne Collier, Woman Crying (Comic) #8, 2019. Images courtesy and © the artists (and their estates and galleries), the photographers, and Hamburger Kunsthalle.

THE POWER OF THE ARTIST

AIDS completely changed American culture. People always say “pop culture.” As if we have some high culture to distinguish it from. The effect of AIDS was like a war in a minute country. Like, in World War I, a whole generation of Englishmen died all at once. And with AIDS, a whole generation of gay men died practically all at once, within a couple of years. And especially the ones that I knew.

The first people who died of AIDS were artists. They were also the most interesting people. I know I’ve said this before, but the audience for the arts—whether it was for writing or films or ballet—also died and no longer exists in a real way. So all the judgment left at the same time that all this creativity left. And it allowed people who would be fifth-rate artists to come to the front of the line. It decimated not just artists but knowledge. Knowledge of a culture. There’s a huge gap in what people know, and there’s no context for it anymore. — Fran Lebowitz*

Daniel Mendelsohn will moderate the panel THE POWER OF THE ARTIST at the Kitchen.

Presented by David Zwirner and the New York Review of Books, panelists include Jeremy O. Harris, Fran Lebowitz, Elizabeth Alexander, and Lisa Yuskavage.

THE POWER OF THE ARTIST—ELIZABETH ALEXANDER, JEREMY O. HARRIS, FRAN LEBOWITZ, and LISA YUSKAVAGE

Monday, February 3, at 6:30 pm

The Kitchen

512 West 19th Street, New York City.

*“The Voice: Fran Lebowitz,” interview by Francesco Clemente, Interview, March 2016.

From top: Jeremy O. Harris; Fran Lebowitz with Andy Warhol; Elizabeth Alexander. , photograph by Djeneba Aduayom. Photographs courtesy and © the subjects and the photographers. Above and below: Lisa Yuskavage, Bonfire, 2013–2015, oil on linen, diptych; Lisa Yuskavage, Naked Neighbors, 2019, oil on linen. Images courtesy and © the authors, the artist, the photographers, and David Zwirner.

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER

I live in a world now where everything is “delegated” to photography. Nothing is left to memory, your own memory. What I’m interested in, instead, are things that can’t be seen, not those that can be… I have always labored under the illusion—but I also think it was true—that nobody ever photographed me. Because my face is not for sale. The real me is not photographable.Benedetta Barzini, to Beniamino Barrese

Beniamino Barrese is the son of Benedetta Barzini—the first Italian model to appear on the cover of American Vogue—and his mother’s obsessive interlocutor throughout his documentary THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER, one of the year’s best.

Summoned by Diana Vreeland in the mid-1960s to come to New York for a few weeks, Barzini stayed for a few years, a sought-after subject of Richard Avedon, Bert Stern, and Andy Warhol, a confident of Gerard Malanga and Salvador Dalí, and an acquaintance of Marcel Duchamp.

Barzini was a double-rebel. Modeling in Manhattan put a necessary distance between Barzini and her parents—heiress Giannalisa Feltrinelli and writer Luigi Barzini, Jr., author of The Italians. But the trajectory of second-wave feminism in the 1970s opened Barzini’s eyes to the ornamental condition of women, and she returned to Italy and became an activist and left-wing academic.

I asked myself this question: Why do we have prototypes of beauty? Why are models at the bow of the ship and the other women are squashed together into the stern? Why? Because men invent women… Maybe it would be better if female bodies disappeared from men’s imaginations.Benedetta Barzini

Barzani explains to her son that the camera is a dangerous liar because within its capture of arbitrary moments, it “freezes” life “within a limited boundary,” contaminating thought and inscribing conformity. “I don’t like frozen things… I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but there are a hundred million photos of sunsets. Frankly, they’re all the same. But they weren’t the same when you saw them.”

Barzini is by turns loving and exasperated with her son and his never-ending investment in images and their documentation. Yet Barzini still models herself—recently appearing in Simone Rocha‘s Fall-Winter 2017 show in London. Nothing if not contradictory, Barzini wants to remove herself from a world she finds deplorable, railing against ambiguity yet unsure which entrance to the void she should walk through. She explains to Barrese that their work together on this film is an act of “separation.” The filmmaker sees it differently, and together they find a sense of an ending.

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF MY MOTHER

Now playing.

Laemmle Monica Film Center

1332 2nd Street, Santa Monica.

Quad Cinema

34 West 13th Street, New York City.

Beniamino Barrese, The Disappearance of My Mother (2019), from top: Benedetta Barzini (3); Barrese and Barzini (2); Richard Avedon spread of Barzini in American Vogue; Barzini on the cover of Vogue Italia, September 1967; Simone Rocha Fall-Winter 2017 show, London; Andy Warhol, Benedetta Barzini Screen Test, 1966; Barzini and Marcel Duchamp, filmed at the artist’s Cordier and Ekstrom Gallery opening by Warhol, 1966 (2); The Disappearance of My Mother U.S. poster; Barzini (5). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the photographers, Benedetta Barzini, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Condé Nast, and Kino Lorber.

ART-RITE LAUNCH

Join ART-RITE founding co-editor Walter Robinson, Pat Steir, Robin Winters, moderator Carlo McCormick, and host Jeffrey Deitch for a panel discussion and launch of the facsimile reprint of ART-RITE.

Collected in a 600-plus-page volume, this co-publication of Primary Information and Printed Matter contains all twenty issues of the newsprint magazine edited by Robinson, Edit DeAk, and Joshua Cohn—who would leave after issue 7—between 1973 and 1978.

(DeAk, Robinson, Sol LeWitt, and Lucy Lippard were among Printed Matter’s 1976 co-founders.)

Contributors to ART-RITE included Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, Bas Jan Ader, Laurie Anderson, David Antin, John Baldessari, Jennifer Bartlett, Gregory Battcock, Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Christian Boltanski, AA Bronson, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Chris Burden, Daniel Buren, Scott Burton, Ulises Carrión, Judy Chicago, Lucinda Childs, Christo, Diego Cortez, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Ralston Farina, Richard Foreman, Peggy Gale, Gilbert and George, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Leon Golub, Guerrilla Art Action Group, Julia Heyward, Nancy Holt, Ray Johnson, Joan Jonas, Richard Kern, Lee Krasner, Shigeko Kubota, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Babette Mangolte, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Rosemary Mayer, Annette Messager, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Brian O’Doherty, Genesis P-Orridge, Nam June Paik, Charlemagne Palestine, Judy Pfaff, Lil Picard, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, David Salle, Julian Schnabel, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Sylvia Sleigh, Jack Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson, Holly Solomon, Naomi Spector, Nancy Spero, Pat Steir, Frank Stella, David Tremlett, Richard Tuttle, Alan Vega, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Hannah Wilke, Robert Wilson, and Irene von Zahn.

ART-RITE PANEL and LAUNCH

Tuesday, December 10, at 7 pm.

Jeffrey Deitch

18 Wooster Street, New York City.

From top: Art-Rite (2); Edit DeAk, photograph by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Walter Robinson, photograph by Greenfield-Sanders; Art-Rite facsimile reprint cover; Art-Rite cover by Christo; Art-Rite launch card. Images courtesy and © the photographer, Walter Robinson, Primary Information, and Printed Matter.