Tag Archives: Andy Warhol

JAMES BIDGOOD — REVERIES

REVERIES—an exhibition of work by the highly influential photographer and filmmaker James Bidgood (try imagining Pierre et Gilles or David LaChapelle without him)—will be up for two more weeks at the Museum of Sex in Manhattan. The show was curated by Lissa Rivera and the artistic director was Serge Becker.

Bidgood’s work is so self-contained that it appears to exist outside of time. Historical referents and views of exteriors hardly impinge at all on his visual world; and yet Bidgood was very much a man of his era. He contributed lush color photographs to magazines such as Muscleboy and The Young Physique during their vogue in the early 1960s. He began work on PINK NARCISSUS in 1963. That year, Jack Smith finished Flaming Creatures and shot Normal Love, Andy Warhol began making films, and Kenneth Anger directed Scorpio Rising; the following year Susan Sontag would publish “Notes on ‘Camp.’ ” 

As the ’60s were happening outside his door, Bidgood was shooting mainly inside, in his cramped Hell’s Kitchen apartment, constantly augmenting and revising his elaborate sets and compositions to approximate the baroque ideal he envisioned. — William E. Jones

JAMES BIDGOOD—REVERIES

Through September 8.

Museum of Sex

233 Fifth Avenue (at 27th Street), New York City.

James Bidgood, from top: Lobster (Jay Garvin), from the series Water Colors, circa early 1960s, digital C-print; Pan (Bobby Kendall), circa late 1960s, digital C-print; Double Image (Kendall), from the series Test Shots, circa early 1960s, digital C-print; Willow Tree (Bruce Kirkman, detail), circa 1965, digital C-print; Street Scene from Pink Narcissus (1971), circa late-1960s; backstage during the filming of Pink Narcissus, contact sheet, circa 1960s; ; Cyclist Sprawled on Tiles in Front of Urinals from Pink Narcissus (Trate Farell), circa mid-1960s; Smoking, Sandcastles (Kendall and Garvin), circa 1960s, digital C-print; Bobby Kendall Seated in Chair Holding Phone, circa mid-1960s; Pearl, Water Colors (Garvin), circa early 1960s; Mythical Woodland, Snake Silhouetted by Moon (Blue Moon), circa late-1960s. Images courtesy and © the artist, ClampArt, New York, and Kelly McKaig.

THE QUEEN, RESTORED

My name is Jack. Well, my mother called me Jack, everybody that cares about me calls me Jack. But I work under the name Sabrina. And all the queens call me by the name Sabrina, whenever I see them. I go up to this queen and say, “What’s your name?” The queen says, “Monique.” And you say, “That’s marvelous darling, but what was your name before?” And the queen will look at you straight in the eye and say, “There was no before.”Jack Doroshow, aka Flawless Sabrina, in THE QUEEN

It’s the late 1960s and national representatives of a burgeoning countercultural movement are gathered in Manhattan for their annual conclave. These young men, however, are not protesting the war in Vietnam but—in at least one case—eager to enlist, not burning the flag but waving it in a musical number. Led by Doroshow—and armed with maquillage, Dexedrine, miles of wig tape, costumes by Mme. Berthé, and a devotion to retrograde Hollywood archetypes and the grand gesture—the “girls” have taken over a dive midtown hotel to prepare for the 1967 Miss All-American Camp Beauty Pageant, the country’s preeminent drag contest.

Interviewed by judges Larry Rivers and Terry Southern (Andy Warhol is also in the house), there is—all things considered—a minimum of shade-throwing, at least during pre-pageant prep. But once he action moves to the main event at Town Hall, the festivities come to a raucous end when runner-up Crystal LaBeija reads everyone within earshot to dirt.

Thanks to director Frank Simon, this was all captured on 16mm film and released as THE QUEEN in 1968. Thanks to a team of film preservationists, the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project, and Kino Lorber, we can now watch this peerless time capsule—previously seen only in glimpses during the opening titles of the first season of Transparent—in its entirety.

THE QUEEN

Through August 8.

Downtown Independent

251 South Main Street, Los Angeles.

See “Flawless Sabrina,” interview by Michael Bullock, Apartamento 19 (Spring-Summer 2017), 272–287.

The Queen, from top: Jack Doroshow, aka Flawless Sabrina; backstage (2); Richard, aka Harlow (3); Kino Lorber poster; Doroshow; the gown competition finale (2). Images courtesy and © the filmmaker, the performers, and Kino Lorber.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT

The Death of Michael Stewart—a 1983 painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat commonly known as Defacement—was Basquiat’s response to the killing of tagger Michael Stewart at the hands of New York City transit cops.

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY—at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—explores of the impact of Stewart’s death on the lower Manhattan art community.

The exhibition—organized by Chaédria LaBouvier—includes work by David Hammons, Keith Haring, Lyle Ashton Harris, George Condo, and Andy Warhol. A film series will play in conjunction with the show (see link below for details).

BASQUIAT’S DEFACEMENT—THE UNTOLD STORY

Through November 6.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue (at 88th Street), New York City.

From top:  Jean-Michel Basquiat, Defacement (The Death of Michael Stewart), 1983, acrylic and marker on wood, collection of Nina Clemente, New York, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018; David HammonsThe Man Nobody Killed, 1986, stenciled paint on commercially printed cardboard with cut-and-taped photocopy from a spiral bound periodical with works by various artists, from Eye magazine, no. 14, “Cobalt Myth Mechanics,” 1986, © the Museum of Modern Art, New York, licensed by SCALA / ARS, New York; Keith HaringMichael Stewart, USA for Africa, 1985, enamel and acrylic on canvas, collection of Monique and Ziad Ghandour, © the Keith Haring Foundation; card for benefit at Danceteria, October 3, 1983, collection of Franck Goldberg, photograph by Allison Chipak, © the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; Jean-Michel BasquiatLa Hara, 1981, acrylic and oil stick on wood panel, Arora CollectionJean-Michel Basquiat, Charles the First, 1982, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, three panels; Lyle Ashton Harris, Saint Michael Stewart, 1994, photograph, courtesy and © Lyle Ashton Harris; Jean-Michel BasquiatUntitled (Sheriff), 1981, acrylic and oil stick on canvas, Carl Hirschmann Collection. Basquiat images courtesy and © the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / Artestar, the collectors, and the photographers.

SYLVIA

“Sylvia’s best friends are her boyfriends. They’re always handsome, young, and unemployed. They follow her. Sylvia doesn’t follow anybody.

“The most famous thing Sylvia ever did was throw a plate of spaghetti, brie cheese, and salad on John Simon’s head. She was furious at him for calling her ‘a party girl and gate crasher’ in one of his reviews. She said, ‘Take that! Now you can call me a plate crasher too!’

“Sylvia never crashes parties, but she is a party girl. During the 1977 Democratic primary in New York a reporter asked Sylvia how she could go to a Bella Abzug fundraiser one night and a Mario Cuomo fundraiser the next. Sylvia replied, ‘I’m not for any candidate. I’m for the party.’

“Sylvia goes to at least three parties a night. One for cocktails, one for dinner, and one for dessert. One night she arrived at her dessert party and a big black waiter asked her if she’d like a cup of coffee. Sylvia said yes and the waiter asked, ‘How do you take your coffee, Miss Miles?’

” ‘I like my coffee the way I like my men,’ said Sylvia, eyeing the waiter up and down.

” ‘I’m sorry, Miss Miles,’ the waiter said, ‘But we don’t have any gay coffee.’ ” — Andy Warhol*

Sylvia Miles, who died on June 12, costarred with Joe Dallesandro in Andy Warhol’s Heat, and was nominated for Best Supporting Actress twice: for seven minutes of work in Midnight Cowboy (1969), and five minutes of work in Farewell, My Lovely (1975).

*Andy Warhol’s Exposures, edited by Bob Colacello (New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1979), 176.

From top: Sylvia Miles and Joe Dallesandro, publicity still for Andy Warhol’s Heat; Miles and Tennessee Williams; Vieux Carré poster for London production; Miles and Dallesandro on set, Heat; Warhol (left), Miles, Geneviève Waïte, and Bob Colacello, 1974, photograph by William E. Sauro; Miles and Dallesandro in Heat.

PARKETT — PHOTO

Parkett presents PHOTO, “the first survey exhibition of all photographic works made by artists for the journal over the last three decades. On view at Parkett’s Zurich space, the show includes some ninety works spanning a rarely seen, vast, and diverse range of photographic positions and ideas.”*

“The exhibition follows the evolution of photographic methods in the past three decades, with many of the earlier photographs making use of analog techniques, while digital editing informs the more recent works. Common threads including people and portraiture, landscapes both urban and natural, everyday objects, and abstraction, connect an otherwise expansive range of visual topics.”*

“Many of the works on view combine photographic elements with other media, such as gouache, collage, textiles, installation, or printmaking. Also on view are works, which while similar in terms of media and format, are unique and contain distinct differences within each project. Further exhibition displays include five video works, as well as a selection of artists’ inserts—the specially commissioned 10–12 book page projects published in each issue of Parkett.”*

“You can grab an issue from thirty years ago and see the context. You can grab that context and time. The internet has no historical orientation. You click on an article and you don’t know what context [it was published in]. I think this loss of memory is deplorable.” — Jacqueline Burckhardt, Parkett co-founding editor**

PHOTO

THE FIRST SURVEY OF ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS MADE BY ARTISTS FOR PARKETT SINCE 1984*

Through September 28.

Parkett Space Zürich

Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

**See “Time, Context, Object—The Parkett Story,” PARIS LA 16 (2018).

PHOTO artists include: Tomma Abts, Franz Ackermann, Doug Aitken, Allora/Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Ed Atkins, John Baldessari, Yto Barrada, Vanessa Beecroft, Alighiero e Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Maurizio Cattelan, Chuck Close, Tacita Dean, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Trisha Donnelly, Tracey Emin, Omer Fast, Robert Frank, Katharina Fritsch, Cyprien Gaillard, Ellen Gallagher, Adrian Ghenie, Gilbert & George, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, David Hammons, Rachel Harrison, Christian Jankowski, Annette Kelm, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Jannis Kounellis, Lee Kit, Zoe Leonard, Liu Xiaodong, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Tracey Moffatt, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Gabriel Orozco, Richard Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, RH Quaytman, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Pipilotti Rist, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Thomas Ruff, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Gregor Schneider, Shirana Shahbazi, Cindy Sherman, Roman Signer, Dayanita Singh, Hito Steyerl, Beat Streuli, Thomas Struth, Sturtevant, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Rosemarie Trockel, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, Charline von Heyl, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Wool, and Yang Fudong.

Parkett editions, from top: Doug Aitken, Decrease the Mass and Run like Hell, 1999, for Parkett 57; Vanessa Beecroft, untitled, 1999, for Parkett 56; Andy Warhol, untitled, 1987, for Parkett 12, 1987; David Hammons, Money Tree, 1992, for Parkett 31; Wolfgang Tillmans, Parkett edition 1992–1998, for Parkett 53; Trisha Donnelly, The Dashiell Delay, 2006 (2), for Parkett 77; Shirana Shahbazi, Composition with Mountain, 2014, for Parkett 94; Sigmar Polke, Desastres und andere bare Wunder, 1982–1984, for Parkett 2; Cindy Sherman, untitled, 1991, for Parkett 29; Jannis Kounellis, untitled, 1985, for Parkett 6; Tracey Emin, Self-Portrait, 12.11.01, for Parkett 63; Franz Ackermann, Peak Season, 2003, for Parkett 68. Images courtesy and © the artists and Parkett.