Tag Archives: Barbara Kruger

ABORTION IS NORMAL — PART 2

Recognizing the ongoing threat to reproductive rights in the United States, ABORTION IS NORMAL—sponsored by the Downtown for Democracy Independent Expenditure Committee—is an “emergency art exhibition curated by Jasmine Wahi and Rebecca Pauline Jampol and organized by Marilyn Minter, Gina Nanni, Laurie Simmons, and Sandy Tait.”*

Part 2 of the show opens this week at Arsenal Contemporary in Manhattan.

Contributing artists include Allison Janae Hamilton, Ameya Marie Okamoto, Amy Khoshbin, Andrea Chung, Arlene Shechet, Barbara Kruger, Betty TompkinsCajsa von ZeipelCarrie Mae Weems, Carroll Dunham, Catherine Opie, Cecily Brown, Chloe Wise, Christopher Myers, Christen Clifford, Cindy Sherman, Delano DunnDerrick Adams, Dominique Duroseau, Elektra KB, Fin Simonetti, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hank Willis Thomas, Hayv Kahraman, Jaishri Abichandani, Jack Pierson, Jane Kaplowitz, Jon Kessler, Jonathan HorowitzJonathan Lyndon Chase, Judith Bernstein, Judith Hudson, Katrina Majkut, Louise Lawler, Lyle Ashton HarrisMarisa Morán Jahn, Michele PredMiguel Luciano, Mika Rottenberg, Nadine Faraj, Nan GoldinNarcissister, Natalie Frank, Rob Pruitt, Ryan McGinley, Sahana Ramakrishnan, Sarah Sze, Shirin Neshat, Shoshanna Weinberger, Shout Your Abortion, Sojourner Truth Parsons, Suzy Lake, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Viva Ruiz, Walter Robinson, Wangechi Mutu, Xaviera Simmons, Yvette Molina, and Zoe Buckman.

New editions by Paul Chan, Rashid Johnson, and Richard Prince are also available.

ABORTION IS NORMAL*

Opening Night

Tuesday, January 21, 6 pm to 8 pm.

Exhibition runs through February 1.

Arsenal Contemporary

214 Bowery, New York City.

Abortion is Normal, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York, January 9–18, 2020, Arsenal Contemporary, New York, January 21–February 1, 2020, from top: Nadine FarajYo Aborte, 2016; Judith Bernstein, Abortion is Normal, 2019; Lyle Ashton HarrisBillie #21, 2002; Cindy Sherman, Untitled, 2019; Marilyn MinterCuntrol, 2020; Shoshanna WeinbergerHair Between the Legs, 2015; Arlene ShechetTo Be Continued, 2018; Nan GoldinGeno by the lake, Bavaria, Germany 1994, 1994; Christen CliffordI Want Your Blood, 2013–2020 (detail); Rob Pruitt, American Quilts 2018: Neighbors, 2018; Catherine Opie, Nicola, 1993; Natalie Frank, Portrait 1, 2019; Laurie SimmonsMother Nursery, 1976; Ameya Marie OkamotoThe Notorious RBG, 2018; Barbara KrugerWho will write the history of tears?, 2011. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, Downtown for Democracy, and Abortion is Normal.


TO FRANK WAGNER

Frank Wagner (1958–2016) introduced Berlin to Félix González-Torres, Cady Noland, Marlene Dumas, Alfredo Jaar, Barbara Kruger, and Nan Goldin, and in 1992 curated Close to the Knives—A Memoir of Disintegration: Ein Gedenkraum für David Wojnarowicz at KW.

For nearly four decades, Wagner was involved with RealismusStudio, a curatorial working group of Berlin’s neue Gesellschaft für bildende Kunst (nGbK). The memorial show TIES, TALES, AND TRACES—DEDICATED TO FRANK WAGNER draws from a selection of artworks and documents from his estate—Wagner left over 10,000 books and catalogues and about 350 artworks—and includes talks, tours, and symposia conducted by his friends and colleagues.

TIES, TALES, AND TRACES—DEDICATED TO FRANK WAGNER

Through May 5.

KW Institute for Contemporary Art

Auguststrasse 69, Berlin.

From top: Frank Wagner at LOVE AIDS RIOT SEX, 2014, neue Gesellschaft für bildende Kunst (nGbK), Berlin, installation view photograph by Christin Lahr, artwork by Anna Charlotte Schmid, Gabor and Stefano III, Budapest, 2012, C-Print, courtesy the artist, the photographer, and nGbK; Wagner at the exhibition Félix González-Torres (1957–1996), RealismusStudio, 1996, photograph by Jürgen Henschel, courtesy KWWagner and AA Bronson, photograph by Alyssa DeLuccia, courtesy Visual AIDS.

A LUTA CONTINUA

The collection of Sylvio Perlstein comprises twentieth-century art movements—from Dada and Surrealism to Abstraction, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Minimal Art, Pop Art, Op Art, Arte Povera, Nouveau Réalisme, Conceptualism, and Contemporary Art—as well as a “collection within the collection” of photography.

The catalogue A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION is out now, and includes essays by Luc Sante, Matthieu Humery, and curator David Rosenberg.

A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION: ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY FROM DADA TO NOW

(Zürich: Hauser & Wirth Publishers, 2018).

From top:

Barbara KrugerUntitled (Busy going crazy)1989. Courtesy the artist.

Vanessa Beecroft, Untitled (performance, detail, Solomon R. Gugghenheim Museum, New York), 1998.

Eugène AtgetBoulevard de la Villette 122, 1924 – 1925. Matte albumen silver print.

Man RayThe Bald Patch, 1919. Silver Print. © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

SWINGERS

Works by Chantal Akerman, Marie Angeletti, Lutz Bacher, Barbara Kruger, Josephine Pryde, Heji Shin, and Akrim Zaatari are on view through mid-December in SWINGERS at Greene Naftali.

Angeletti’s visual essay “Noir Kei Ninomiya” is in the current print issue of PARIS LA.

SWINGERS

Through December 15.

Greene Naftali, 508 West 26th Street, 8th floor, New York City.

From top:

Barbara KrugerUntitled (Project for Dazed and Confused), detail, 1996.

Marie AngelettiNew York, October, 2018, 35 mm slides.

Heji ShinDick and Snake II, 2018. C-print.

Akram ZaatariHER + HIM, 2001-2012. Ratio: 16/9, color, sound, 33 minutes.

Images courtesy the artists and Greene Naftali.

PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

“I always believed up to that point [1981] that there should be some radical separation between self and work—a separation that of course was theorized. I don’t totally understand this anymore. I don’t completely know why or how this was the case.

“I think my work now is involved in a continual self-questioning that isn’t a kind of existentialist ‘who am I’ questioning, but an inquiry into the self as constructed and positioned, which necessarily gives the work an air of intellectual intimacy… Many people think that the texts are in fact products of a falsely constructed authoritative voice. I hope that’s not the case…

“The mistake is always then that the idea of subjectivity becomes the dominant motif in the work.” — Craig Owens

 

CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

By Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield (who interviewed Owens for the book in 1984).

(New York: Badlands Unlimited, 2018)

Also see:

BEYOND RECOGNITION, by Craig Owens

Edited by Scott BrysonBarbara KrugerLynne Tillman, and Jane Weinstock 

(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994)

Above: Craig Owens and Joan Simon at South Street Seaport, New York City. Photograph by Elizabeth C. Baker.

Image credit below: Badlands Unlimited.