Tag Archives: Barbara Kruger

A LUTA CONTINUA

The collection of Sylvio Perlstein comprises twentieth-century art movements—from Dada and Surrealism to Abstraction, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Minimal Art, Pop Art, Op Art, Arte Povera, Nouveau Réalisme, Conceptualism, and Contemporary Art—as well as a “collection within the collection” of photography.

The catalogue A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION is out now, and includes essays by Luc Sante, Matthieu Humery, and curator David Rosenberg.

A LUTA CONTINUA—THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION: ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY FROM DADA TO NOW

(Zürich: Hauser & Wirth Publishers, 2018).

From top:

Barbara KrugerUntitled (Busy going crazy)1989. Courtesy the artist.

Vanessa Beecroft, Untitled (performance, detail, Solomon R. Gugghenheim Museum, New York), 1998.

Eugène AtgetBoulevard de la Villette 122, 1924 – 1925. Matte albumen silver print.

Man RayThe Bald Patch, 1919. Silver Print. © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

SWINGERS

Works by Chantal Akerman, Marie Angeletti, Lutz Bacher, Barbara Kruger, Josephine Pryde, Heji Shin, and Akrim Zaatari are on view through mid-December in SWINGERS at Greene Naftali.

Angeletti’s visual essay “Noir Kei Ninomiya” is in the current print issue of PARIS LA.

SWINGERS

Through December 15.

Greene Naftali, 508 West 26th Street, 8th floor, New York City.

From top:

Barbara KrugerUntitled (Project for Dazed and Confused), detail, 1996.

Marie AngelettiNew York, October, 2018, 35 mm slides.

Heji ShinDick and Snake II, 2018. C-print.

Akram ZaatariHER + HIM, 2001-2012. Ratio: 16/9, color, sound, 33 minutes.

Images courtesy the artists and Greene Naftali.

PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

“I always believed up to that point [1981] that there should be some radical separation between self and work—a separation that of course was theorized. I don’t totally understand this anymore. I don’t completely know why or how this was the case.

“I think my work now is involved in a continual self-questioning that isn’t a kind of existentialist ‘who am I’ questioning, but an inquiry into the self as constructed and positioned, which necessarily gives the work an air of intellectual intimacy… Many people think that the texts are in fact products of a falsely constructed authoritative voice. I hope that’s not the case…

“The mistake is always then that the idea of subjectivity becomes the dominant motif in the work.” — Craig Owens

 

CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

By Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield (who interviewed Owens for the book in 1984).

(New York: Badlands Unlimited, 2018)

Also see:

BEYOND RECOGNITION, by Craig Owens

Edited by Scott BrysonBarbara KrugerLynne Tillman, and Jane Weinstock 

(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994)

Above: Craig Owens and Joan Simon at South Street Seaport, New York City. Photograph by Elizabeth C. Baker.

Image credit below: Badlands Unlimited.

ART AND COMMODITY AT THE HIRSHHORN

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BRAND NEW – ART AND COMMODITY IN THE 1980s brings together rarely seen works by Jessica Diamond, Peter Halley, Barbara Kruger, Joel Otterson, Erika Rothenberg, Sarah Charlesworth, Haim Steinbach, Meyer Vaisman, and Julia Wachtel, as well as artist collectives and projects such as ACT UP Gran Fury, The OfficesGeneral Idea, Guerilla Girls, and Fashion Moda.

 

BRAND NEW – ART AND COMMODITY IN THE 1980s, through May 13.

HIRSHHORN MUSEUM, Independence Avenue and 7th Street, Washington, D.C.

hirshhorn.si.edu/brand-new-art-commodity-1980s

See: nytimes.com/east-village-artist

From top:

Donald Moffett, He Kills Me, 1987. Image credit © Donald Moffett.

Ken Lum, Alex Gonzalez Loves His Mother and Father, 1989. Image courtesy of the artist.

ACT UP Gran Fury, Silence = Death, 1987. Image credit: New Museum.

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CRAIG OWENS LAUNCH AND PANEL

A newly edited and updated version of Craig Owens’ 1984 interview with Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield has been published by Badlands Unlimited.

Join Lynne Tillman, Thomas Beard, and Horsfield for CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC, a book launch and panel discussion with Paul Chan and Johanna Burton at the New Museum.

Owens (1950 – 1990) was an associate editor at October and a senior editor at Art in America. His essays are collected in Beyond RecognitionRepresentation, Power, and Culture (1994).

In his memoir Before Pictures, Douglas Crimp describes the quality of Owen’s “unrestrained intellectual enthusiasm.”:

“In many of our late-night phone calls… [Owens] would say something like, ‘I’m writing a brilliant essay on…’—on whatever it was he was working on at the moment. I was at first taken aback by his apparent immodesty, but I grew to understand and appreciate his elation at the process of his own thinking, sparked by his voracious reading.” — Douglas Crimp*

 

CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

Launch and panel

Friday, March 2, at 7 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

 

* Douglas Crimp, “Agon,” in Before Pictures (Brooklyn: Dancing Foxes Press/Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016), 213.

Above: Craig Owens photographed by Barbara Kruger in her loft, 1988. Image credit: New Museum.

Below: Craig Owens, 1982, from the series Art World. © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders.