Tag Archives: Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.

BAUHAUS — DOCUMENTA

BAUHAUS / DOCUMENTA—VISION UND MARKE—a new exhibition in Kassel curated by Philipp Oswalt and Daniel Tyradellis—looks at the crosscurrents between two iconic German institutions:

Bauhaus aimed to confront the crisis of industrialization and the damages caused by the First World War through the applied design of objects, spaces and buildings; documenta took up the romantic idea of the engagement with fine art, through which people should become responsible citizens again.”*

The show—part of the celebration of the Bauhaus centenary—includes works by Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Bazon Brock, Hans Haacke, Wassily Kandinsky, Barbara Klemm, Aleksandr Ptuschko, and Gilles Raynaldy.

BAUHAUS / DOCUMENTA—VISION UND MARKE*

Through September 8.

Neue Galerie

Schöne Aussicht 1, Kassel.

From top: Staircase of the Fridericianum with tapestry by Fritz Winter, 1956–1957, documenta 2, 1959, photograph by Günther Becker; Sculpture Hall at documenta I, Kassel, 1955, featuring works by Hans Arp, Henri Laurens, Alexander Calder, and Henry Moore; rotunda at the Fridericianum, documenta I, photograph by Günther Becker. Below: invitation card for Bauhaus/documenta—Vision und Marke, featuring images of Haus-Rucker-Co, Oase Nr. 7 (Oasis No. 7), documenta 5, 1972, photograph by Carl Eberth; and Wilhelm Wagenfeld ‘s Tischleuchte (table lamp), 1924, photograph by Joachim Fliegner. Images courtesy and © documenta archiv.

BAUHAUS POLITICS

Join Arjun Appadurai, Regina Bittner, Beatriz Colomina, Theresia Enzensberger, Jesko Fezer, Thomas Flierl, Benjamin Förster-Baldenius, Ayşe Güleç, Dorothee Halbrock, Ulrike Hamann, Christian Hiller, Joy Kristin KaluÖzcan KaradenizBianca Klose, Klaus Lederer, Gisela Mackenroth, Jacobus North, Anh-Linh Ngo, Marion von Osten, Philipp Oswalt, Stefan Rettich, Bernd Scherer, Schroeter und Berger, Justus H. Ulbricht, and Mark Wigley for an afternoon and evening seminar which asks the question:

What can institutions that are today confronted with attacks from the Right learn from the history of Bauhaus?

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Saturday, January 19, from 2 pm to 9:30 pm.
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Haus der Kulturen der Welt
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John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10, Berlin.
From top: Gropius studio, Kandinsky-Klee house, 1925–1926, Dessau; Walter Gropius, Bauhaus Building, 1925–1926, Dessau.

CARL FIEGER

Carl Fieger (1893–1960)—initially a draftsman in the office of Walter Gropius and Adolf Meyer—made architectural history with his first building. “Though the single-family house of 1924 remained an experimental building, the circular building (a Wohnmaschine, or machine for living in) had an immense effect on the professional community and future architects. It was an important contribution to the search for new standards in housing construction.”*

CARL FIEGER—FROM BAUHAUS TO BAUAKEDEMIE brings together the architect and designer’s original drawings, architectural models, furniture, photographs and works produced as a student. His versatile artistic approaches “retain the multifaceted character of the Bauhaus in its role as a school of design.”*

 

CARL FIEGER—FROM BAUHAUS TO BAUAKEDEMIE

Through October 31.

BAUHAUS DESSAU, Gropiusallee 38 Dessau-Rosslau.

Carl Fieger catalogue

Above: Carl Fieger, Haus Fieger, Dessau, 1927.

Below: Carl Fieger, drawing Haus Fieger. Image credit: Bauhaus Dessau.

JOSEF & ANNI ALBERS

This morning, I found a few drawings made by Josef Albers. Looking through them, I also rediscovered the works of his wife, Anni Albers. What an amazing couple! They were the leading pioneers of 20th-century modernism.

Josef Albers (1888–1976) was an influential teacher, writer, painter, and color theorist—now best known for the Homages to the Square he painted between 1950 and 1976, and for his innovative 1963 publication Interaction of Color. Anni Albers (1899–1994) was a textile designer, weaver, writer, and printmaker who inspired a reconsideration of fabrics as an art form, both in their functional roles and as wallhangings.
The couple met at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany in 1922. This new teaching institution, which transformed modern design, had been founded three years earlier, and emphasized the connection between artists, architects, and craftspeople.

Here some of their beautiful works.

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Owl (II), ca. 1917, ink on paper, Josef Albers

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Under Way, 1963, cotton, linen, wool, Anni Albers

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Two geese, ca. 1917, ink on paper, Josef Albers

1994-10-22

Study for Camino Real, 1967, gouache on graph paper, Anni Albers

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Gitterbild (Grid Mounted), ca. 1921, glass, metal, and wire, Josef Albers