Tag Archives: Betye Saar

CHARLES WHITE AND HIS CIRCLE

This is the closing weekend for TRUTH & BEAUTY—CHARLES WHITE AND HIS CIRCLE, an exhibition of works by the great draftsman and his friends and colleagues, reflecting White’s working life in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles—the host cities of his concurrent retrospective.

Among White’s circle and included in the show are Romare Bearden, Betye SaarRoy DeCarava, Philip Evergood, Robert Gwathmey, David Hammons, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Norman Lewis, Ben ShahnJohn Biggers, Eldzier Cortor, Kerry James Marshall, and Hale Woodruff.

TRUTH & BEAUTY—CHARLES WHITE AND HIS CIRCLE

Through Saturday, November 10.

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, 100 Eleventh Avenue (at 19th Street), New York City.

 

CHARLES WHITE—A RETROSPECTIVE

Through January 13.

Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York City.

The retrospective will be on view in Los Angeles in early 2019, along with two coincident exhibitions: LIFE MODEL—CHARLES WHITE AND HIS STUDENTS at LACMA’s satellite gallery at Charles White Elementary School—formerly Otis Art Institute, where the artist taught for many years—and a show at CAAM.

CHARLES WHITE—A RETROSPECTIVE

February 17 through June 9.

LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top:

Charles WhiteJ’Accuse! No.5, 1966, Wolff crayon and charcoal on paper.

Betye SaarThe Mystic Window #1, 1965, assemblage with etchings, graphite, ink, and watercolor on paper in antique window frame.

Romare BeardenFlights and Fantasy, 1970, mixed media collage of various papers and synthetic polymer paint on Masonite.

Charles WhiteUntitled, 1945, tempera and graphite on illustration board.

Charles WhiteJuba #2, 1965, Wolff crayon and oil wash on illustration board.

Image credit: Michael Rosenfeld Gallery.

 

FOR JACK WHITTEN

In a tribute to Jack Whitten, a group of his friends and colleagues, artists and curators—including Candida Alvarez, Jose Luis Blondet, Joshua Chambers Letson, Erin Christovale, Harry Dodge, Naima Keith, Diana Nawi, Betye Saar, Gary Simmons, Lily Blue Simmons, Bennett Simpson, and Alphaeus Taylor—will read from NOTES FROM THE WOODSHED, the just-published collection of Whitten’s writing.

 

JACK WHITTEN—NOTES FROM THE WOODSHED Reading and Launch

Saturday, August 25, at 3 pm.

hauserwirth.com/jack-whitten-notes-woodshed

hauserwirth.com/publications/jack-whitten

JACK WHITTEN—SELF PORTRAIT WITH SATELLITES, through September 23.

HAUSER & WIRTH, 901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

hauserwirth.com/jack-whitten-self-portrait-satellites

Above image courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

Below: Jack Whitten in the early 1970s on the corner of Broadway and Broome Street, New York City. Courtesy the Estate of Jack Whitten.

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION—BLACK RADICAL WOMEN, 1965–1985 “examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism.”

The exhibition includes work by Emma Amos, Camille Billops, Kay Brown, Vivian E. Browne, Linda Goode Bryant, Beverly Buchanan, Carole Byard, Elizabeth Catlett, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Ayoka Chenzira, Christine Choy and Susan Robeson, Blondell Cummings, Julie Dash, Pat Davis, Jeff Donaldson, Maren Hassinger, Janet Henry, Virginia Jaramillo, Jae Jarrell, Wadsworth Jarrell, Lisa Jones, Loïs Mailou Jones, Barbara Jones-Hogu, Carolyn Lawrence, Samella Lewis, Dindga McCannon, Barbara McCullough, Ana Mendieta, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Alva Rogers, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Coreen Simpson, Lorna Simpson, Ming Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems.

 

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION—BLACK RADICAL WOMEN, 1965–1985, through January 14.

CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM, 600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles.

https://caamuseum.org/exhibitions/2017/we-wanted-a-revolution

Closing symposium, Saturday, January 14, from 1 pm to 7 pm.

caamuseum.org/we-wanted-a-revolution-closing-symposium

Faith Ringgold, The People’s Flag Show.

ringgold_peoplesflagshow_810x455

SOUTH OF PICO

“In SOUTH OF PICO, [writer, curator, and professor] Kellie Jones explores how artists in the 1960s and ’70s in Los Angeles’ black communities created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism… She shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility… She also attends to these artists’ relationships with gallery and museum culture as well as the establishment of black-owned arts spaces. With SOUTH OF PICO, Jones expands the understanding of the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.”*

Join the California African American Museum (CAAM) and Art + Practice in welcoming Kellie Jones for a discussion and signing of her book.

KELLIE JONES—SOUTH OF PICO 

AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING, Monday, October 23, from 7 pm to 9 pm.

ART + PRACTICE, Public Programs Space, 4334 Degnan Boulevard, Leimert Park, Los Angeles.

artandpractice.org/public-programs/

dukeupress.edu/south-of-pico

Image credit: Duke University Press.

publicprograms_kellie-

POWER AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

“The cultural contributions of women and women of color are still underrepresented in the art world, and we are still asked to contextualize our practice in ways that other privileged artists simply are not.” — Shinique Smith*

“I have recently been exploring the idea of doing my work in secret. I was inspired by discovering the work of The United Order of Tents. They are a secret society of black nurses. They have supported each other and done good works since the Civil War. The Mother Emmanuel Church met in secret for 35 years, while black churches were banned in South Carolina after the Nat Turner rebellion.

“I don’t really have time to explain my work to people who feel that I have an identity and they don’t. I don’t have time to unpack all that. I’m focused on using black feminist theory or any other tools that can help me sharpen my knife, and make better work.” — Simone Leigh*

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, a survey of over 60 works by 37 artists—including Ellen Gallagher, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Betye Saar, Ntozake ShangeMickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems—is now on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles.

The exhibition, curated by Todd Levin, also includes a selection of images from the Ralph DeLuca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography.

 

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, through June 10.

SPRÜTH MAGERS, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Artists’ quotes from Power, the booklet published on the occasion of the exhibition:

spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/445

ALSO SEE: theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/05/kara-walker-karon-davis-power-black-female-artists

The participating artists: Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Sonya Clark, Renee Cox, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Karon Davis, Minnie Evans, Nona Faustine, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ellen Gallagher, Leslie Hewitt, Clementine Hunter, Steffani Jemison, Jennie C. Jones, Simone Leigh, Julie Mehretu, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Sondra Perry, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Joyce J. Scott, Emmer Sewell, Ntozake Shange, Xaviera Simmons, Lorna Simpson, Shinique Smith, Renee Stout, Mickalene Thomas, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Kara Walker, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Carrie Mae Weems, and Brenna Youngblood.

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014 Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood 243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm 96 x 20 x 20 inches Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014
Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood
243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
96 x 20 x 20 inches
Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers