Tag Archives: Bing Theater

FOSSE, VERDON, AND ALL THAT JAZZ

In anticipation of the upcoming limited series FOSSE/VERDON—the story of the personal and professional collaboration between director-choreographer Bob Fosse (1927–1987) and dancer-actor Gwen Verdon (1925–2000)—LACMA presents a screening of Fosse’s extraordinary “semi-autobiographical” film ALL THAT JAZZ (1979), featuring a tour de force performance by the late Roy Scheider.

Three nights later, the museum hosts a big-screen presentation of “Life is a Cabaret,” chapter one of FOSSE/VERDON, which stars Sam Rockwell as Fosse and Michelle Williams as Verdon. The series will air on FX from April 9.

Fosse was one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century dance, and the footprints—and indelible attitude—of his choreography in Cabaret, Chicago, Damn Yankees, The Pajama Game, and Sweet Charity are still apparent in works being created today.

ALL THAT JAZZ

Monday, April 1, at 7:30 pm.

FOSSE/VERDON

Thursday, April 4, at 7:30 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA

5955 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Michelle Williams as Gwen Verdon and Sam Rockwell as Bob Fosse in Fosse/Verdon(2019); Roy Scheider in All That Jazz; Fosse backstage at New York’s City Center during the 1963 production of Pal Joey; Tab Hunter and Verdon in Damn Yankees (1958), courtesy New York Library for the Performing Arts; Liza Minnelli and Fosse on set, Cabaret (1972); Rockwell and Williams in Fosse/Verdon.

NEVER LOOK AWAY

Inspired by the youth of a colossus of contemporary art, NEVER LOOK AWAY is Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s fictional take on the early life of Gerhard Richter, who grew up under the Nazis (and in the GDR after the war), studied and practiced Socialist Realism at Dresden’s Art Academy, and escaped to the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf just before the Wall went up.

Tom Schilling stars as Kurt Barnert, and Oliver Masucci plays a character based on Joseph Beuys. The cast includes Paula Beer and Sebastian Koch, who was in Henckel von Donnersmarck’s remarkable debut feature The Lives of Others.

The AFI Fest 2018 presents the Los Angeles premiere of NEVER LOOK AWAY this weekend at the Egyptian, with an encore screening on Wednesday at the Chinese. The director will be present on Sunday in Hollywood, as well as at LACMA for a January, 2019 screening.

 

NEVER LOOK AWAY

Sunday, November 11, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Wednesday, November 14, at 2:45 pm.

Chinese Sixplex

6925 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

Friday, January 18, at 7:30 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

See Dana Goodyear on the Richter-Donnersmarck dynamic; and Morgan Falconer, “Photo-Painting,” in Painting After Pollock (London: Phaidon, 2015), 232–247.

Top: Tom Schilling in Never Look Away.

Above: Shilling and Paula Beer.

Below: Schilling. Image credit: Sony Pictures Classics.

ORSON WELLES — THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND

Part Barefoot Contessa, part Nashville, part psychedelic head trip—a sixties hangover shot in the seventies, abandoned in the eighties, and finally edited down from over 100 hours of footage to a two-hour cut—Orson Welles’ final film, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND, is a fascinatingly crass long day’s journey into night: the last fevered hours of Jake Hannaford, a past-his-prime Hollywood director played by John Huston with his signature leer and sense of exhausted disdain.

Surrounded by an entourage of enablers and trailed by a scrum of paparazzi and video documentarians, Hannaford makes his merry way out to Palm Springs to watch the rushes from his latest attempt at a cinematic comeback, which—as many early viewers have noted—plays like a Welles parody of Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point.

(The hyper-erotic film-within-a-film stars Welles’ partner Oja Kodar, and Robert Random—both frequently nude and both the objects of Hannaford’s obsession.)

Shot in multiple film stocks, this propulsive blend of coercion, abuse, and overwhelming cynicism teeters on and off the rails from its opening scene, but you won’t be able to divert your eyes from the action.

“More acutely than any other work attached to Welles, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND is built—in form and content—of thrown voices, feints, false fronts, and tall tales leading to and from Welles’ idea of himself as a public figure, as the performance of a lifetime, drawn at maximum clarity then cracked apart and squirreled within shadows of such depth as to permit only flashes, glimpses, and whispers of that self-image.

“To be a wreck is, it seems, a certain sort of freedom.” — Phil Coldiron in Cinema Scope.

Tonight, THEY’LL LOVE ME WHEN I’M DEAD—the Morgan Neville documentary on Welles and his struggle to make his last opus—will screen at LACMA. Tomorrow night at the same venue, producer Frank Marshall will present the Welles picture, followed by a Q & A.

(Later this week, Marshall will also present Welles’ film at UCLA.)

 

THEY’LL LOVE ME WHEN I’M DEAD

Monday, October 29, at 7:30 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND

Tuesday, October 30, at 7:30.

Bing Theater, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND

Thursday, November 1, at 7:30 pm.

James Bridges TheaterUCLA, 235 Charles E. Young Drive North, Los Angeles.

 

Through November 8:

Noho 7, 5240 Lankershim, North Hollywood.

From Friday, November 9:

Glendale, 207 North Maryland Avenue, Glendale.

And on Netflix.

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND features screen appearances by Mercedes McCambridge, Paul Stewart, Norman Foster, Susan Strasberg, Edmond O’Brien, Lilli Palmer, Claude Chabrol, Dennis Hopper, Stéphane AudranPaul Mazursky, and Welles intimate Peter Bogdanovich, whose efforts in the assembly and release of the film were significant.

From top:

Oja Kodar(left) and Orson Welles (right) in the set of The Other Side of the Wind.

Kodar (2).

Robert Random and Kodar.

Credit for all images: Netflix.

ALEX PRAGER’S GRANDE SORTIE

Commissioned by Benjamin Millepied when he was the head of the Paris Opéra Ballet, LA GRANDE SORTIE is Alex Prager’s short film about the audience-performance dichotomy, the psychology of the crowd, and spontaneous, unresolved connections never to be repeated.

Join Prager and LACMA director Michael Govan for a post-screening discussion in the museum’s Art Catalogues shop.

 

LA GRAND SORTIE

Saturday, October 13, at 3:30 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

ALEX PRAGER and MICHAEL GOVAN IN CONVERSATION

Art Catalogues, LACMA, following the screening.

Above: Alex Prager, La Grande sortie.

Below: Émilie Cozette in La Grande sortie. Images courtesy the artist.

KEN JACOBS

“[Ken Jacobs], cinema’s master inter- and reinventionist, [has] found yet another way to make the medium new, employing a logarithim to rework a thirty-second fragment of a 1897 Lumière actualité into a seventy-three minute 3D movie wherein space regularly inverts itself. Kinda has to be seen to be believed.” — J. Hoberman on THE GUESTS, Artforum

Experimental filmmaker Ken Jacobs is out and about this week for public conversations, screenings, and Q & As.

In conjunction with the exhibition 3D—DOUBLE VISION:

KEN JACOBS IN CONVERSATION

A SWIM THROUGH OPEN SPACE

Sunday, October 7, at 1 pm.

Bing Theater, LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

.

Nervous Magic Lantern performance with live sound by Aki Onda:

Redcat, 631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.
.
Los Angeles premiere:
THE GUESTS , directed by Ken Jacobs
Tuesday, October 9, at 8 pm.
Downtown Independent, 251 South Main Street, downtown Los Angeles.