Tag Archives: Carrie Mae Weems

L.A. DANCES — PROGRAM A

L.A. Dance Project presents L.A. DANCES—A FESTIVAL OF 10 DANCE WORKS, an engagement of ten Los Angeles premieres—plus a new production of Bella Lewitzky’s KINAESONATA—over the course of the next two months.

Program A includes new work by L.A. Dance Project dancers Janie Taylor (ADAGIO IN B MINOR) and Gianna Reisen (RISING WATER)—as well Kyle Abraham’s CHAPTER SONG. This fast-moving piece of vignettes and quick cuts features costumes and text by the choreographer, voiceover by Carrie Mae Weems, and music by everyone from Philip Glass and Barbra Streisand to Outkast and Kendrick Lamar.

The evening opens with SPLIT STEP, a collaboration by visual artist Emily Mast, director Zack Winokur, composer Evan Mast, lighting designer Christopher Kuhl, and the dancers of L.A. Dance Project.

L.A. DANCES—PROGRAM A

Thursday through Sunday, September 26, 27, 28, and 29.

Thursday through Sunday, October 10, 11, 12, and 13.

Sunday, October 20, and Thursday, October 24.

All performances at 8 pm.

L.A. Dance Project

2245 East Washington Boulevard, downtown Los Angeles.

L.A. Dance Project, L.A. Dances—A Festival of 10 Dance Works, Program A images courtesy and © L.A. Dance Project, the dancers, and the photographers.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS — PAST TENSE

“As much as I’m engaged with it, with violence, I remain ever hopeful that change is possible and necessary, and that we will get there. I believe that strongly, and representing that matters to me: a sense of aspiration, a sense of good will, a sense of hope, a sense of this idea that one has the right, that we have the right to be as we are.” — Carrie Mae Weems*

The timeless themes of political power, social justice, gender oppression, and valiant persistence are brought to life in a modern context in PAST TENSE, Carrie Mae Weems’ multimedia take on Antigone.

Combining music, spoken word, video, and projected images, PAST TENSE—presented this week in Los Angeles by CAP UCLA—includes works by poet Carl Hancock Rux and composer Craig Harris, and will be performed by Weems, Eisa Davis, Francesca Harper, David Parker, Imani Uzuri, and Alicia Hall Moran, who brought the house down at Disney Hall earlier this week in Bryce Dessner’s Triptych.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS—PAST TENSE

Friday, March 8, at 8 pm.

Theatre at Ace Hotel

929 South Broadway, downtown Los Angeles.

*Megan O’Grady, “Carrie Mae Weems,” T: The New York Times Style Magazine, October 21, 2018, 140.

From top: Carrie Mae Weems, Past Tense, in performance; Past Tense production photographs (2) by William Strugs; Carrie Mae Weems, portrait by Jerry Klineberg; Past Tense, in performance with, from right, Alicia Hall Moran, Imani Uzuri, and Eisa Davis. Images courtesy CAP UCLA.

GROUNDINGS

GROUNDINGS, organized by Grace Deveney and Tara Aisha Willis, explores movement—seen and unseen—through a series of residencies with artists who work in dance, music, and performance art. The exhibition considers the reciprocal influence between bodies in motion and the invisible forces that govern movement, such as gravity, time, and electricity.

Over the run of GROUNDINGS, performers will hold open rehearsals in which they create performances and physical objects that speak to the themes of the exhibition.

GROUNDINGS artists include Katinka Bock, Blythe Bohnen, George Brecht, John Cage, Martin Soto Climent, Julia Dault, JimmyDeSana, Jonas Dovydenas, Adam EkbergWhit Forrester, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Rashid Johnson, IsaacJulien, Annette Kelm, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Jack Pierson, Stan Shellabarger, Nancy Spero, Dannielle Tegeder, CarrieMae Weems, and James Welling.

GROUNDINGS

Through May 12.

MCA Chicago

220 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago.

From top:

John CageA Dip in the Lake: Ten Quicksteps, Sixty-two Waltzes, and Fifty-six Marches for Chicago and Vicinity, 1978. Felt-tip pen on map. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. © 1993 John Cage TrustPhotograph © MCA Chicago.

Annette KelmUntitled, 2012. Chromogenic development print. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Jimmy De SanaCowboy Boots, 1984. Vintage cibachrome. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Courtesy of the JimmyDe Sana Trust and Salon 94, New York.

Rashid Johnson, Multiple Consciousness, 2010. Gelatin silver print. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. © 2010 RashidJohnsonPhotograph by Nathan Keay© MCA Chicago.

CARRIE MAE WEEMS — STRATEGIES OF ENGAGEMENT

CARRIE MAE WEEMS—STRATEGIES OF ENGAGEMENT comprises thirty years of the artist’s practice in the form of recreated installations of her groundbreaking work that exposes systems of power and injustice, preparing viewers “for a more engaged discussion of American history through such difficult issues as violence, survival, and the need for radical social change.”*

CARRIE MAE WEEMS—STRATEGIES OF ENGAGEMENT*

Through December 13.

McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2101 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston.

From top:

Profile 1, from All the Boys, 2016, pigment ink prints on gesso board.

If I Ruled the World, from Hopes and Dreams: Gestures of Demonstration, 2006–07, pigment ink print.

Lincoln, Lonnie, and Me: A Story in 5 Parts, 2012, video installation and mixed media.

Images © Carrie Mae Weems, courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York City.

PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ

Peggy Cooper Cafritz—the Washington, D.C., collector of African-American art, salonist, activist, fundraiser, co-founder of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, and just-published author—died last week in the capital.

Her 2018 book FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY brings together images of more than 200 works of art that were lost in a 2009 house fire, as well as the art Cooper Cafritz had collected in the years since the catastrophe.

The Cooper Cafritz collection includes pieces by Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Alma Thomas, Norman Lewis, Kara Walker, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas, El Anatsui, Yinka Shonibare, Nick Cave, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae WeemsNoah Davis, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Titus KapharNjideka Akunyili Crosby, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.

PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ, FIRED UP! READY TO GO!—FINDING BEAUTY, DEMANDING EQUITY: AN AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE IN ART, THE COLLECTIONS OF PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ (New York: Rizzoli , 2018).

Contributors to the book’s text include Thelma Golden, Simone Leigh, Uri McMillan, Jack ShainmanTschabalala Self.

From top: Torkwase Dyson, Strange Fruit (Blue Note), 2015, acrylic on board; Romare Bearden, Prince Cinque (Maquette), 1976, felt pen with watercolor and collage on graph paper; Jas Knight, Autumn, 2015, oil on linen; Loren Holland, The Messenger, 2005, oil on paper; Noah Davis, Black Widow, 2007, acrylic and gouache on canvas; Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled, 2012. All images © the artists, courtesy the Estate of Peggy Cooper Cafritz, and Rizzoli.