Tag Archives: Charles Gaines

CHARLES GAINES IN CONVERSATION

When I went to graduate school in the 1960s… I was faced with a dilemma… I was surrounded by ideas about art that I couldn’t identify with. I couldn’t identify with the practice of trying to decide what to put in a painting using a kind of intuition. Or looking at a painting as a vehicle for self-expression. It’s not that I looked down on that, or that I thought it was such a bad idea. It’s just that I wasn’t working in a manner that required that kind of behavior… Then I ran into a person who told me about a couple of books, which I bought and read. One was by the art historian Henri Focillon [1881–1943], called The Life of Forms in Art [1934]. The other was a big picture book on Tantric Buddhist art by Ajit Mookerjee [1915–1990]. In those books I began to find things that made sense to me in terms of art production.

[Focillon] had a Platonic perspective, that form was synonymous with number, with mathematics, with structure. And he said that form had a life of its own, had its own reciprocal fitness, had its own autonomous exigency..

This sounds like the tenets of high modernism. I don’t think it followed those tenets in talking about some kind of tautology or self-referential or self-reflexive apparatus. I saw it as a general critique of expressionism, which was central to my problem. I didn’t feel connected with the objects I was making, because when I made them, I wasn’t convinced that there was any connection between my motive to make something and the thing that I made. It just seemed arbitrary to me. I would see painters laboring in front of a painting, trying to decide whether a corner should be red or blue. To me it didn’t make any difference. It could be red or blue, you know? How can they feel good about a judgment that they make? On what basis do they establish this connection? And for the life of me, I couldn’t figure it out.

Focillon gave me the idea that you’re ultimately not the author of the object. You’re more like a vehicle of this realization without an author. With Tantric art I saw visual representation of the same idea.Charles Gaines*

This weekend—in conjunction with his Hauser & Wirth exhibition CHARLES GAINES—PALM TREES AND OTHER WORKS—join Gaines in conversation with Thelma Golden, Laura Owens, and Gary Simmons.

ARTIST TALK—CHARLES GAINES IN CONVERSATION with THELMA GOLDEN, LAURA OWENS, and GARY SIMMONS

Sunday, November 3, at 3 pm.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

“Charles Gaines, January 31, 1995,” in ArtCenter Talks: Graduate Seminar, The First Decade 1986–1995, edited by Stan Douglas (New York: David Zwirner Books / Pasadena, CA: ArtCenter Graduate Press, 2016), 172–197.

See Gina Osterloh on Gaines’ Shadows series.

Charles Gaines—Palm Trees and Other Works, Hauser & Wirth, Los Angeles, September 14, 2019–January 5, 2020, photographs by Fredrik Nilsen. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographer, and Hauser & Wirth.

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

At LACMA this weekend, join Charles Gaines, writers and scholars Jennifer González, Shelleen Greene, Ariel Osterweis, B. Ruby Rich, Jeffrey Stewart, and Sarah Thornton, curator Mark Nash, and LACMA‘s Naima J. Keith and Christine Y. Kim for a daylong symposium of screenings and panel discussions celebrating the work of Isaac Julien—who will be in attendance.

Among the complete works to be presented are PLAYTIME, LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS, WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS, and a 30th anniversary screening of LOOKING FOR LANGSTON, Julien’s film about Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes.

Excerpts from KAPITAL and TEN THOUSAND WAVES will also be shown.

ISAAC JULIEN SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, May 18, from 9 am to 5 pm.

ISAAC JULIEN—PLAYTIME

Through August 11.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Full schedule of screenings and speakers:

9:00 am — Coffee and pastries.

9:25 am — Welcome and introductions by Christine Y. Kim, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, LACMA.

9:30 am — PLAYTIME (2014). Sarah Thornton.

9:50 am — KAPITAL (2013), excerpt. Charles Gaines and Mark Nash.

10:50 am — WESTERN UNION: SMALL BOATS (2007). Jennifer González and Shelleen Greene.

12:00 pm — TEN THOUSAND WAVES (2010) (excerpt). Jeffrey Stewart and Ariel Osterweis, with Christine Y. Kim.

1:10 pm to 1:55 pm — Lunch will be provided for participants.

2:00 pm — LOOKING FOR LANGSTON (1989). B. Ruby Rich and Isaac Julien

3:35 pm — LESSONS OF THE HOUR—FREDERICK DOUGLASS (2019). Isaac Julienand Jeffrey Stewart, with Naima J. Keith

Isaac Julien, from top: Emerald City / Capital (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 2013 (2); The Abyss (Playtime), 2013; Playtime, 2013, LACMA, installation view Metro Pictures, 2013, photograph by Genevieve Hanson; All that’s solid melts into air (Playtime), 2013; Ten Thousand Waves, 2010, 35mm film, transferred to HD 9.2 surround sound; Icarus descending (Playtime), 2013; Isaac Julien, Eclipse (Playtime), 2013. Black and white photograph of Isaac Julien, 2017, by Thierry Bal. All works and images courtesy and © Isaac Julien, the photographers, Victoria Miro, London, and Metro Pictures, New York.

SHARIFA RHODES-PITTS AT COOPER UNION

This week, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts will give a talk as part of the IDS Public Lecture series at Cooper Union.

SHARIFA RHODES-PITTS

Tuesday, March 26, at 7 pm.

Frederick P. Rose Auditorium

Cooper Union

40 Cooper Square, New York City.

See Rhodes-Pitt and Charles Gaines in “Freed But Not Free”: Artists at the Venice Biennale Respond to the #BlackLivesMatter Movement.

Also see “Curriculum Year Zero,” a transcription of Rhodes-Pitts’ Creative Time Summit talk at the 2015 Venice Biennale, PARIS LA 14 (Winter 2016): 26–28.

From top: Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, photograph by Marcus Werner, courtesy the writer and the photographer; book cover image courtesy Little, Brown.

ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

“While geological epochs are known as products of slow change, the Anthropocene has been characterized by speed. Runaway climate change, rising water, surging population, non-stop extinction, and expanding technologies compress our breathless sense of space and time.”*

Organized around seven themes—Deluge, Raw Material, Consumption, Extinction, Symbiosis and Multispecies, Justice, and Imaginary Futures—the traveling exhibition THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE explores the ongoing crisis through the work of over forty artists.

THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE*

Through March 3.

Harn Museum of Art

University of Florida

3259 Hull Road, Gainesville.

From April 27 through July 28:

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

University of Michigan Museum of Art

525 South State Street, Ann Arbor.

See: Antek Walczak, “Welcome to the Anthropocene: Tornadoes of Cash and Hurricanes of Capital,” in Oscar Tuazon Live (Los Angeles: DoPe Press/Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014), 55–62.

THE WORLD TO COME includes work by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Claudia Andujar, Sammy Baloji, Subhankar Banerjee, Huma Bhabha, Liu Bolin, Edward Burtynsky, Sandra Cinto, Elena Damiani, Dornith Doherty, Charles Gaines, Mishka Henner, Felipe Jácome, Chris Jordan, William Kentridge, Wifredo Lam, Maroesjka Lavigne, Eva Leitolf, Dana Levy, Yao Lu, Pedro Neves Marques, Noelle Mason, Mary Mattingly, Gideon Mendel, Ana Mendieta, Kimiyo Mishima, Richard Misrach, Beth Moon, Richard Mosse, Jackie Nickerson, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, Abel Rodríguez, Allan Sekula, Taryn Simon, Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Laurencia Strauss, Thomas Struth, Bethany Taylor, Frank Thiel, Sergio Vega, Andrew Yang, and Haegue Yang.

From top: Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Spatial Intervention 1, video still, 2002. Courtesy the artists. © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2017; Taryn SimonWhite Tiger (Kenny), Selective Inbreeding, Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and Foundation, Eureka Springs, Arkansas (detail), 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007, © Taryn SimonLiu Bolin, Hiding in the City, No. 95, Coal Pile, 2010, image courtesy the artist, © Liu BolinRichard Mosse, Stalemate, 2011, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Maroesjka LavigneWhite Rhino, Namibia, from the series Land of Nothingness (2015), courtesy of the artist.

MARTHA ROSLER — FEMINISM AND THE STATE

This weekend at MOCA, the artist Martha Rosler will deliver the keynote address at FEMINISM AND THE STATE—ART, POLITICS, AND RESISTANCE, a symposium organized byRutgers University’s The Feminist Art Project (TFAP). “The TFAP symposium will open space for a discussion of art and art history that sheds light on historical precedents and paths for feminist resistance, with a special focus on methodologies pressing at the limits of art history.”*

This presentation is part of the annual College Art Association conference, where Charles Gaines will give the keynote address this evening (February 21, at 6 pm) at the Los Angeles Convention Center.**

 

FEMINISM AND THE STATE—ART, POLITICS, AND RESISTANCE, Saturday, February 24, from 10 am to 4:30 pm.

MARTHA ROSLER KEYNOTE ADDRESS is at 10:15 am.

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/feminism-and-the-state-art-politics-and-resistance

** conference.collegeart.org/CharlesGaines

 

Martha Rosler.

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