Tag Archives: Charles Gaines

ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

“While geological epochs are known as products of slow change, the Anthropocene has been characterized by speed. Runaway climate change, rising water, surging population, non-stop extinction, and expanding technologies compress our breathless sense of space and time.”*

Organized around seven themes—Deluge, Raw Material, Consumption, Extinction, Symbiosis and Multispecies, Justice, and Imaginary Futures—the traveling exhibition THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE explores the ongoing crisis through the work of over forty artists.

THE WORLD TO COME—ART IN THE AGE OF THE ANTHROPOCENE*

Through March 3.

Harn Museum of Art

University of Florida

3259 Hull Road, Gainesville.

From April 27 through July 28:

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

University of Michigan Museum of Art

525 South State Street, Ann Arbor.

See: Antek Walczak, “Welcome to the Anthropocene: Tornadoes of Cash and Hurricanes of Capital,” in Oscar Tuazon Live (Los Angeles: DoPe Press/Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014), 55–62.

THE WORLD TO COME includes work by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Claudia Andujar, Sammy Baloji, Subhankar Banerjee, Huma Bhabha, Liu Bolin, Edward Burtynsky, Sandra Cinto, Elena Damiani, Dornith Doherty, Charles Gaines, Mishka Henner, Felipe Jácome, Chris Jordan, William Kentridge, Wifredo Lam, Maroesjka Lavigne, Eva Leitolf, Dana Levy, Yao Lu, Pedro Neves Marques, Noelle Mason, Mary Mattingly, Gideon Mendel, Ana Mendieta, Kimiyo Mishima, Richard Misrach, Beth Moon, Richard Mosse, Jackie Nickerson, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, Abel Rodríguez, Allan Sekula, Taryn Simon, Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Laurencia Strauss, Thomas Struth, Bethany Taylor, Frank Thiel, Sergio Vega, Andrew Yang, and Haegue Yang.

From top: Nicole Six and Paul Petritsch, Spatial Intervention 1, video still, 2002. Courtesy the artists. © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2017; Taryn SimonWhite Tiger (Kenny), Selective Inbreeding, Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and Foundation, Eureka Springs, Arkansas (detail), 2006–07, from the series An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007, © Taryn SimonLiu Bolin, Hiding in the City, No. 95, Coal Pile, 2010, image courtesy the artist, © Liu BolinRichard Mosse, Stalemate, 2011, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Maroesjka LavigneWhite Rhino, Namibia, from the series Land of Nothingness (2015), courtesy of the artist.

MARTHA ROSLER — FEMINISM AND THE STATE

This weekend at MOCA, the artist Martha Rosler will deliver the keynote address at FEMINISM AND THE STATE—ART, POLITICS, AND RESISTANCE, a symposium organized byRutgers University’s The Feminist Art Project (TFAP). “The TFAP symposium will open space for a discussion of art and art history that sheds light on historical precedents and paths for feminist resistance, with a special focus on methodologies pressing at the limits of art history.”*

This presentation is part of the annual College Art Association conference, where Charles Gaines will give the keynote address this evening (February 21, at 6 pm) at the Los Angeles Convention Center.**

 

FEMINISM AND THE STATE—ART, POLITICS, AND RESISTANCE, Saturday, February 24, from 10 am to 4:30 pm.

MARTHA ROSLER KEYNOTE ADDRESS is at 10:15 am.

MOCA GRAND AVENUE, 250 South Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

moca.org/feminism-and-the-state-art-politics-and-resistance

** conference.collegeart.org/CharlesGaines

 

Martha Rosler.

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MARILYN MINTER — ANGER MANAGEMENT

2018 is an election year, a chance to end Republican control of Congress.

Educate, organize, resist, register, vote…

… and check out the selection from Marilyn Minter and Andrianna Campbell’s ANGER MANAGEMENT, a pop-up featuring resistant work by John Baldessari, Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter, Zoe Buckman, Nicole Eisenman, Charles Gaines, Jenny Holzer, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Barbara Kruger, Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Laura Owens, Jack Pierson, Mary Ping, Faith Ringgold, Laurie Simmons, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and many others.

A portion of the proceeds will go to charity and to the Brooklyn Museum.

shop.brooklynmuseum.org/marilyn-minter-resist-t-shirt

 

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EXHIBITION: CHARLES GAINES AT THE HAMMER

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989, the first museum exhibition of Gaines’s early conceptual serial work, opened last weekend at the Hammer Museum. In a highly informative walkthrough, Gaines and Studio Museum Harlem curator Naima J. Keith discussed the difficulty of producing beautiful and meaningful art absent of subjective expression.

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The exhibited series, produced while Gaines was living in Fresno and before he moved to Los Angeles to teach at CalArts, employ rigorously mathematical formulations to plot–and superimpose–the coordinates of photographs onto hand-drawn graph paper, as system he described as “aesthetic and functional at the same time.” Throughout the exhibition’s fifteen years, Gaines continued to create increasingly difficult systems for his work, moving from static subjects (trees) to human faces and eventually moving bodies, in a collaboration with Trisha Brown.

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“I was troubled by the problem of expressivity and the linkage of that to notions of self and identity, almost like the simple idea that a personal signature is an expression of the self, and this becomes extrapolated to an entire discipline like art,” said Gaines. “And I was troubled by it because I was painting but I couldn’t feel a relationship with the images that I produced as a painter, which were produced out of a kind of strategy production based upon subjective expression.”

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Gaines cited the writings of Henri Focillon and an early exposure to Eastern Tantric art as revealing the possibility of employing systems to create beautiful images without the influence of subjective expression. “I simply wanted to be able to articulate casually the way images are there, and demonstrate that even though I am operating in a deterministic, mimetic system, subjectivity is suppressed but the poetic relationship with the work isn’t suppressed,” he said.

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989 is on view until May 24.