Tag Archives: Cindy Sherman

CINDY SHERMAN — METRO PICTURES

Chance does have a major role to play. Using a live person—myself especially—allows for chance… Because each picture in a roll of film can be completely different, that’s the element of chance that works for me. This is why whenever I’ve tried to do more still life-type shots—with mannequins and dolls—it’s so much harder as I have to decide what it is I’m looking for while I’m setting it up. — Cindy Sherman*

A new body of work by Sherman comprising ten photographs—”androgynous characters… dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing”—is on view at Metro Pictures through the rest of the week, in person or via its online viewing room.

CINDY SHERMAN

Through October 31, by appointment.

Metro Pictures

519 West 24th Street, New York City.

*“A Conversation with Cindy Sherman by Hans Ulrich Obrist,” Paradis 6 (2012): 92.

Cindy Sherman, Metro Pictures, September 26, 2020–October 31, 2020, from top: Untitled #603, 2019, dye sublimation print; Untitled #610, 2019, dye sublimation print; Untitled #612, 2019, dye sublimation print; Untitled #615, 2019, dye sublimation print; Untitled #609, 2019, dye sublimation print; Untitled #611, 2019, dye sublimation print. Images © Cindy Sherman, courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures.

LAWLER, QUAYTMAN, AND ROWLAND AT BUCHHOLZ

When Metro Pictures asked me to do a show in 1982, they already had an image. They represented a group of artists whose work often dealt with issues of appropriation and was often spoken of and written about together. A gallery generates meaning through the type of work they choose to show. I self-consciously made work that “looked like” Metro Pictures. The first thing you saw when you entered my show, Arrangements of Pictures, was an arrangement of works the gallery had on hand by “gallery artists” Robert Longo, Cindy Sherman, Jack Goldstein, Laurie Simmons, and James Welling. A wall label titled it “Arranged by Louise Lawler.” It was for sale as a work with a price determined by adding up the prices of the individual pieces, plus a percentage for me. I went to the collectors to whom Metro had sold work and photographed the Metro artists’ works in those contexts. I printed the resulting images a “normal” picture size and titled them “arrangements,” too—for example, “Arranged by Barbara and Eugene Schwartz, New York City.” The Metro situation at that time formed that work, and it also formed a way of working for me. — Louise Lawler*

Invited to exhibit together for the first time, Louise Lawler, R. H. Quaytman, and Cameron Rowland present new work along with selected older pieces for a group show in Cologne, now in its final week.

LOUISE LAWLER, R. H. QUAYTMAN, CAMERON ROWLAND

Through October 24.

Galerie Buchholz

Neven-DuMont-Strasse 17, Cologne.

*“Prominence Given, Authority Taken: An Interview with Louise Lawler by Douglas Crimp,” in Louise Lawler: An Arrangement of Pictures (New York: Assouline, 2000).

Louise Lawler, R. H. Quaytman, Cameron Rowland, Galerie Buchholz, September 4, 2020–October 24, 2020, from top: Louise Lawler, Water to Skin (catalogue size), 2016/2017, digital Fujiflex print face mounted to Plexiglas on museum box (The Swimming Pool, 1952, Henri Matisse, gouache on paper, cut and pasted on painted paper, installed as nine panels in two parts on burlap-covered walls, photographed at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City); Louise Lawler, Water to Skin (traced), 2016/2020, vinyl adhesive wall material (the work is as a tracing by Jon Buller available as a PDF vector file for production and installation at any scale as an adhesive wall graphic); Louise Lawler, Corner (distorted for the times, perturbée), 2014/2018, digital Fujiflex print face mounted to Plexiglas on museum box (A work by Jean-Michel Basquiat photographed at Yvon Lambert’s office, 108 Rue Vieille du Temple, Paris); Cameron Rowland, Management, 2020, time horn clock; Cameron Rowland, Out of Sight, 2020, 19th-century slave iron, 19th-century slave iron with missing rattle; R.H. Quaytman, Spine, Chapter 20 [Fraser, Anastas, Lawler], 2010, oil, silkscreen ink and gesso on wood (featuring the silkscreened image of Andrea Fraser viewing Louise Lawler’s The Princess, Now the Queen—utilized in four paintings from Painters Without Paintings and Paintings Without Painters, Chapter 8, 2006—combined with a second silkscreened image of Rhea Anastas—utilized in two paintings from Ark, Chapter 10, 2008. Two black bars and the cropping orthogonal of the Andy Warhol painting in Louise Lawler’s photo delimit the silkscreened imagery along with overpainting in Marshall’s photo oils. Down the center is a line of red, green and blue. This line was placed on all paintings in Chapter 20 that reused a silkscreen for a second time.); R.H. Quaytman, + ×, Chapter 34 [V], 2018, indigo distemper and gesso on wood; Louise Lawler, Position (noun), 1982/2020, gelatin silver print, installation view. Images courtesy and © the artists and Galerie Buchholz.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Fourteen at-risk non-profit visual arts organizations in New York City—Artists Space, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Dia Art Foundation, the The Drawing CenterEl Museo del BarrioHigh Line Art, MoMA PS1, New Museum, Public Art Fund, Queens Museum, Sculpture Center, the The Studio Museum in Harlem, Swiss Institute, and White Columns—will benefit from the sale of artwork made available as part of the Hauser & Wirth initiative ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK.

Two non-profit charitable partners are also supported: The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts (FCA).

Located at the gallery’s two New York locations and online, more than 100 artists are participating in the project, including Rita Ackermann, Kelly Akashi, Ida Applebroog, Genesis Belanger, Lynda Benglis, Katherine Bernhardt, Huma Bhabha, Carol Bove, Katherine Bradford, Sam Falls, Charles Gaines, Maureen Gallace, Joanne Greenbaum, Mona Hatoum, Mary Heilmann, Camille Henrot, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Shara Hughes, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Sanya Kantarovsky, June Leaf, Simone Leigh, Zoe Leonard, Glenn Ligon, Sam McKinniss, Marilyn Minter, Sarah Morris, Angel Otero, Adam Pendleton, Elizabeth Peyton, Jack Pierson, R.H. Quaytman, Deborah Roberts, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Tschabalala Self, Amy Sherald, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Laurie Simmons, Taryn Simon, Lorna Simpson, Avery Singer, Sarah Sze, Kara Walker, Mary Weatherford, and the estate of Anne Truitt.

See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Through October 22.

Hauser & Wirth

548 West 22nd Street, New York City.

32 East 69th Street, New York City.

From top: Lorna Simpson, Haze, 2019, ink and screenprint on gessoed fiberglass, photograph by James Wang, image courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth; Kelly Akashi, Feel Me (Flesh), 2020, hand-blown glass and bronze, image courtesy and © the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles; Mary Weatherford, Meeting in the Forest, 2019, flashe and neon on linen, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen Studio, image courtesy and © the artist, David Kordansky Gallery, and Gagosian; Rashid Johnson, Standing Broken Men, 2020, ceramic tile, mirror tile, spray enamel, oil soap, black stick, wax, photograph by Martin Parsekian, image courtesy and © the artist; Jack Pierson, Inquire Within, 2020, metal and wood, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Angel Otero, Sleepy Fire, 2020, oil paint and fabric collaged on canvas, image courtesy and © Lehmann Maupin; Jenny Holzer, from Survival (1983–85), 2020, photograph by Graham Kelman, image courtesy and © the artist and Artist Rights Society (ARS).


ARTISTS FOR BIDEN FUNDRAISER

Over 100 artists and estates have donated works for a fundraiser supporting Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.* Presented on Platform.art—an initiative developed by David Zwirner—participating galleries include Regen Projects, Jack Shainman, Gladstone, Lehmann Maupin, Petzel, and Marian Goodman, as well as Gemini G.E.L.

Following a virtual kickoff earlier this week with vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris, Carrie Mae Weems, and Catherine Opie, the sale is now live. See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR BIDEN

October 2–October 8, 2020.

Platform.art

*Participating artists and estates include Marina Adams, Doug Aitken, Richard Aldrich, John Baldessari (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alvin Baltrop, Walead Beshty, McArthur Binion, Dike Blair, Sebastian Blanck, Carol Bove, Cecily Brown, George Condo, Patricia Cronin, Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Tara Donovan, Carroll Dunham, Marcel Dzama, William Eggleston, Rafa Esparza, Shepard Fairey, Rochelle Feinstein, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa​, Spencer Finch, Suzan Frecon, Charles Gaines, Jerrell Gibbs, Sam Gilliam, Joanne Greenbaum, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, Thomas Hager, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Tyler Haughey, Michael Heizer, Carmen Herrera, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Jenny Holzer, Ridley Howard, Alex Hubbard, John Huggins, Ayana V. Jackson, Rashid Johnson, Deborah Kass, KAWS, Ellsworth Kelly, Jon Kessler, Toba Khedoori, Christine Sun Kim, Jeff Koons, Doron Langberg, Liz Larner, Bonnie Lautenberg, An-My Lê, Roy Lichtenstein, Maya Lin, Robert Longo, Emmanuel Lubezki, Brice Marden, Julie Mehretu, Marilyn Minter, Ivan Morley, Rebecca Morris, Vik Muniz, Wangechi Mutu, Jordan Nassar, Alice Neel, Shirin Neshat, Catherine Opie, Angel Otero, Jack Pierson, Lari Pittman, Martin Puryear, Christina Quarles, Robert Rauschenberg (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alexis Rockman, Ugo Rondinone, Victoria Roth, Ed Ruscha, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Fred Sandback, Fanny Sanín, Kenny Scharf, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Gary Simmons, Laurie Simmons, Xaviera Simmons, Vaughn Spann, Tavares Strachan, Sarah Sze, Mika Tajima, Kyle Thurman, Fred Tomaselli, Leo Villareal, Charline von Heyl, Carrie Mae Weems, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Stanley Whitney, Kehinde Wiley, Chloe Wise, Christopher Wool, Rob Wynne, Lisa Yuskavage, and Andrea Zittel.

From top: Carrie Mae WeemsRemember to Dream, 2020, screenprint on rag paper, printed by Kaleb Hunkele of Standard Art Supply, image courtesy and © the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Michael Heizer, Blue Diorite, 1981, 89-lb. blue diorite in aluminum frame, image © Michael Heizer, courtesy Agnes Gund, the artist, and Gagosian, photograph by Rob McKeever, donated by a private collector; Carol BoveCoy Satanism, 2020, stainless steel and urethane paint, image courtesy and © the artist and David Zwirner; Liz Larner, Fictile, 2010–2011, ceramic and epoxy, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Kyle Thurman, Suggested Occupation 56 (Spring Image, travel nightly), 2020, gouache, graphite, and watercolor on paper in artist’s frame, image courtesy and © the artist and David Lewis; Charline von Heyl, The Sticky Hour, 2018, acrylic and crayon on linen, image courtesy and © the artist and Petzel Gallery; Tavares StrachanWe Are in This Together (Multi),, 2019, neon and transformers, image courtesy and © the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery; Jenny Holzer, selection from Truisms: Abuse of power comes as no surprise, 2015, dark labradorite footstool, image courtesy and © the artist and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Sam Gilliam, Untitled, 2020, watercolor on washi paper, image courtesy and © the artist and David Kordansky Gallery; KAWS, Together, 2017, painted bronze, image courtesy and © the artist; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (profile portrait), n.d., gelatin silver print, image courtesy and © the Alvin Baltrop Trust, Third Streaming, and Galerie Buchholz; Lari Pittman, Portrait of a Human (Pathos, Ethos, Logos, Kairos #17), 2018, cel vinyl and spray paint on linen on wood panel, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Ed RuschaWe (#1), dry pigment and acrylic on paper, 2020, image courtesy and © the artist.

ABORTION IS NORMAL — PART 2

Recognizing the ongoing threat to reproductive rights in the United States, ABORTION IS NORMAL—sponsored by the Downtown for Democracy Independent Expenditure Committee—is an “emergency art exhibition curated by Jasmine Wahi and Rebecca Pauline Jampol and organized by Marilyn Minter, Gina Nanni, Laurie Simmons, and Sandy Tait.”*

Part 2 of the show opens this week at Arsenal Contemporary in Manhattan.

Contributing artists include Allison Janae Hamilton, Ameya Marie Okamoto, Amy Khoshbin, Andrea Chung, Arlene Shechet, Barbara Kruger, Betty TompkinsCajsa von ZeipelCarrie Mae Weems, Carroll Dunham, Catherine Opie, Cecily Brown, Chloe Wise, Christopher Myers, Christen Clifford, Cindy Sherman, Delano DunnDerrick Adams, Dominique Duroseau, Elektra KB, Fin Simonetti, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hank Willis Thomas, Hayv Kahraman, Jaishri Abichandani, Jack Pierson, Jane Kaplowitz, Jon Kessler, Jonathan HorowitzJonathan Lyndon Chase, Judith Bernstein, Judith Hudson, Katrina Majkut, Louise Lawler, Lyle Ashton HarrisMarisa Morán Jahn, Michele PredMiguel Luciano, Mika Rottenberg, Nadine Faraj, Nan GoldinNarcissister, Natalie Frank, Rob Pruitt, Ryan McGinley, Sahana Ramakrishnan, Sarah Sze, Shirin Neshat, Shoshanna Weinberger, Shout Your Abortion, Sojourner Truth Parsons, Suzy Lake, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Viva Ruiz, Walter Robinson, Wangechi Mutu, Xaviera Simmons, Yvette Molina, and Zoe Buckman.

New editions by Paul Chan, Rashid Johnson, and Richard Prince are also available.

ABORTION IS NORMAL*

Opening Night

Tuesday, January 21, 6 pm to 8 pm.

Exhibition runs through February 1.

Arsenal Contemporary

214 Bowery, New York City.

Abortion is Normal, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York, January 9–18, 2020, Arsenal Contemporary, New York, January 21–February 1, 2020, from top: Nadine FarajYo Aborte, 2016; Judith Bernstein, Abortion is Normal, 2019; Lyle Ashton HarrisBillie #21, 2002; Cindy Sherman, Untitled, 2019; Marilyn MinterCuntrol, 2020; Shoshanna WeinbergerHair Between the Legs, 2015; Arlene ShechetTo Be Continued, 2018; Nan GoldinGeno by the lake, Bavaria, Germany 1994, 1994; Christen CliffordI Want Your Blood, 2013–2020 (detail); Rob Pruitt, American Quilts 2018: Neighbors, 2018; Catherine Opie, Nicola, 1993; Natalie Frank, Portrait 1, 2019; Laurie SimmonsMother Nursery, 1976; Ameya Marie OkamotoThe Notorious RBG, 2018; Barbara KrugerWho will write the history of tears?, 2011. Images courtesy and © the artists, the photographers, Downtown for Democracy, and Abortion is Normal.