Tag Archives: Claudia Rankine

JULIANA SPAHR AND CLAUDIA RANKINE

DU BOIS’S TELEGRAM is a brilliant inquiry into the institutions—from the CIA to the foundations and literary magazines it funded—that inform and shape literary production. The promoted, the funded and heralded—from Richard Wright to Gertrude Stein to James Baldwin—do the work of the nation state under the umbrella of culture. Our complicit freedoms are brought out in the open in this thought-provoking and erudite book. This is not a book to agree or disagree with, but rather a compelling argument that brings relevant facts forward for clear-eyed consideration. One would be remiss to pass on such essential research and analysis.” — Claudia Rankine

Juliana Spahr—author of DU BOIS’S TELEGRAM —will be joined by Rankine for a discussion about the book, which takes as its impetus the telegram W.E.B. Du Bois sent when he was denied a passport to attend the 1956 Présence Africaine Congress of Black Writers and Artists in Paris:

“Any Negro-American who travels abroad today must either not discuss race conditions in the United States or say the sort of thing which our State Department wishes the world to believe.” — W.E.B. Du Bois

 

CLAUDINE RANKINE AND JULIANA SPAHR

Thursday, December 13, at 7:30 pm.

92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Avenue, New York City.

 

DUBOIS’S TELEGRAM—LITERARY RESISTANCE AND STATE CONTAINMENT, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018).

Above: Claudia Rankine.

Below: Juliana Spahr.

CLAUDIA RANKINE AND WILL RAWLS — WHAT REMAINS

“I’m still thinking about the potential of using abstraction to speak to identity: How can these two things fit together when identity is so much about announcing, concretizing, and naming, and abstraction is about undoing? Of course, abstraction has roots in something real…

“What does it mean to break apart language, and its history, and to work with it pictographically? Dance has this process built into it already: its visual and affective impact scrambles language. It produces and speaks other languages of and about the body.” — Will Rawls*

WHAT REMAINS—a collaboration between poet and playwright Claudia Rankine, dancer/choreographer Will Rawls, and filmmaker and photographer John Lucas exploring how “erasure and exposure shape black American life”—comes to MCA/Chicago’s Warehouse this week.

Performers include Leslie Cuyjet, Jessica Pretty, and Tara Aisha Willis. The sound design is by Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste, production design by David Szlasa, and costume design by Eleanor O’Connell.

Tonight, the museum presents Rankine and Rawls for a discussion about their practice.

TALK—CLAUDIA RANKINE WITH WILL RAWLS

Tuesday, December 4, at 8 pm.

Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago.

 

WHAT REMAINS

Wednesday through Sunday, December 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, at 7:30 pm.

MCA Warehouse, 1747 West Hubbard Street, Chicago.

*”Will Rawls: 1000 Words,” Artforum, October 2018, 194.

Claudia Rankine, Will Rawls, and John LucasWhat Remains. Photographs © Julieta Cervantes, courtesy Live Arts Bard.

WOMEN AT WORK

The new interview book by The Paris ReviewWOMEN AT WORK, with an introduction by Ottessa Moshfegh—is limited to 5,000 copies, and is available only through the journal’s website.

Included in the book are interviews with Dorothy ParkerClaudia RankineIsak DinesenSimone de BeauvoirElizabeth BishopMarguerite YourcenarMargaret AtwoodGrace PaleyToni MorrisonJan MorrisJoan Didion, and Hilary Mantel.

 

WOMEN AT WORK—INTERVIEWS FROM THE PARIS REVIEW

theparisreview.org/women-at-work/

Image credit: The Paris Review.

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