Tag Archives: David Hammons

PARKETT — PHOTO

Parkett presents PHOTO, “the first survey exhibition of all photographic works made by artists for the journal over the last three decades. On view at Parkett’s Zurich space, the show includes some ninety works spanning a rarely seen, vast, and diverse range of photographic positions and ideas.”*

“The exhibition follows the evolution of photographic methods in the past three decades, with many of the earlier photographs making use of analog techniques, while digital editing informs the more recent works. Common threads including people and portraiture, landscapes both urban and natural, everyday objects, and abstraction, connect an otherwise expansive range of visual topics.”*

“Many of the works on view combine photographic elements with other media, such as gouache, collage, textiles, installation, or printmaking. Also on view are works, which while similar in terms of media and format, are unique and contain distinct differences within each project. Further exhibition displays include five video works, as well as a selection of artists’ inserts—the specially commissioned 10–12 book page projects published in each issue of Parkett.”*

“You can grab an issue from thirty years ago and see the context. You can grab that context and time. The internet has no historical orientation. You click on an article and you don’t know what context [it was published in]. I think this loss of memory is deplorable.” — Jacqueline Burckhardt, Parkett co-founding editor**

PHOTO

THE FIRST SURVEY OF ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS MADE BY ARTISTS FOR PARKETT SINCE 1984*

Through September 28.

Parkett Space Zürich

Limmatstrasse 268, Zürich.

**See “Time, Context, Object—The Parkett Story,” PARIS LA 16 (2018).

PHOTO artists include: Tomma Abts, Franz Ackermann, Doug Aitken, Allora/Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Ed Atkins, John Baldessari, Yto Barrada, Vanessa Beecroft, Alighiero e Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Maurizio Cattelan, Chuck Close, Tacita Dean, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Trisha Donnelly, Tracey Emin, Omer Fast, Robert Frank, Katharina Fritsch, Cyprien Gaillard, Ellen Gallagher, Adrian Ghenie, Gilbert & George, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, David Hammons, Rachel Harrison, Christian Jankowski, Annette Kelm, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Jannis Kounellis, Lee Kit, Zoe Leonard, Liu Xiaodong, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Tracey Moffatt, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Bruce Nauman, Gabriel Orozco, Richard Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, RH Quaytman, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Pipilotti Rist, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Thomas Ruff, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Gregor Schneider, Shirana Shahbazi, Cindy Sherman, Roman Signer, Dayanita Singh, Hito Steyerl, Beat Streuli, Thomas Struth, Sturtevant, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Rosemarie Trockel, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo, Charline von Heyl, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Wool, and Yang Fudong.

Parkett editions, from top: Doug Aitken, Decrease the Mass and Run like Hell, 1999, for Parkett 57; Vanessa Beecroft, untitled, 1999, for Parkett 56; Andy Warhol, untitled, 1987, for Parkett 12, 1987; David Hammons, Money Tree, 1992, for Parkett 31; Wolfgang Tillmans, Parkett edition 1992–1998, for Parkett 53; Trisha Donnelly, The Dashiell Delay, 2006 (2), for Parkett 77; Shirana Shahbazi, Composition with Mountain, 2014, for Parkett 94; Sigmar Polke, Desastres und andere bare Wunder, 1982–1984, for Parkett 2; Cindy Sherman, untitled, 1991, for Parkett 29; Jannis Kounellis, untitled, 1985, for Parkett 6; Tracey Emin, Self-Portrait, 12.11.01, for Parkett 63; Franz Ackermann, Peak Season, 2003, for Parkett 68. Images courtesy and © the artists and Parkett.


DAVID HAMMONS IS ON OUR MIND

DAVID HAMMONS IS ON OUR MIND—the Wattis Institute catalogue that includes a 1994 artist’s talk as well as texts by Tongo Eisen-Martin and Fred Moten—is out of print, but Artbook at Hauser & Wirth has a few copies left.

DAVID HAMMONS IS ON OUR MIND

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth

917 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

DAVID HAMMONS

Through August 11.

Hauser & Wirth

901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: David Hammons is on Our Mind, book cover image courtesy and © the artist and the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts; David Hammons, Orange is the New Black, 2017, mixed media; David Hammons, untitled, 2017. Artwork images courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth, photographs by Genevieve Hanson.

DASH SNOW — THE DROWNED WORLD

“Dash [Snow] and David Hammons are both artists with a witch-doctor feel to their work, which is important, because ultimately what is the value of art?… In an increasingly secular society, it’s even more important as people try to form their belief systems. If you’re not going the readymade route, then you look around for the tools available to make something of your own. That’s a big part of the artist’s job or the writer’s job…

“It’s found in the moment, not in an academic way. You find it in the practice. I think the academic and institutional part of the art world is a big problem. Artists often collaborate with them to their detriment, because they think they need the institution as a go-between, a translator for the public. Dash, like Hammons, understood that you don’t need the middleman. Cut out the middleman. Make him wait in line with everyone else. It has to be on the artist’s terms.” — Glenn O’Brien on Dash Snow*

The new exhibition THE DROWNED WORLD presents work from the late artist’s archive, including a selection of rarely seen sculptures.

DASH SNOW—THE DROWNED WORLD

Through May 12.

Participant Inc

253 East Houston Street, New York City.

*”I Don’t Believe in Masterpieces AnywayGlenn O’Brien on Dash Snow,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

See Nicole Miller and David Rimanelli on Snow.

Dash Snow, from top: Mixed-media sculpture, 2000–2009; The Drowned World: Selections from the Dash Snow Archive, 2019, installation view, Participant Inc, New York, photograph by Mark Waldhauser; Untitled, 2000–2009, Polaroid (Kunle Martins (left) and Snow); Untitled (Past, Present), 2006, mixed-media sculpture; Untitled, 2007, collage; Untitled (Her Kisses Were Dangerous), 2006–2007, collage. Images © Dash Snow, courtesy of the Dash Snow Archive, New York City and Participant Inc. Special thanks to Lia Gangitano.

GRACE WALES BONNER

The public presentation of MUMBO JUMBOGrace Wales Bonner’s Autumn/Winter 2019 collection that shares a title with Ismael Reed’s revolutionary 1972 novel—will conclude A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS, Wales Bonner’s exhibition at the Serpentine.

Throughout this final week of the show, the dancer and performance artist Michael-John Harper will take residence within the gallery and perform a daily ritual of movements.

Exploring “magical resonances within black cultural and aesthetic practices” through improvised installations and shrines, A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS also incorporates the work of Chino AmobiBlack Audio Film Collective, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, David Hammons, Michael-John Harper, Liz Johnson Artur, Rashid Johnson, Kapwani Kiwanga, Klein, Laraaji, Eric N. Mack, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Ben Okri, Ishmael Reed, Sahel Sounds, and Wales Bonner.

GRACE WALES BONNER—A TIME FOR NEW DREAMS

Through February 16.

Serpentine Sackler Gallery

West Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

Exhibition booklet.

From top: Eric N. Mack, Capital Heights, 2019, in Grace Wales Bonner—A Time for New Dreams, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, 2019; Rashid Johnson, Untitled (daybed 1), 2012; Wales Bonner; Grace Wales Bonner, Everything’s for RealLiz Johnson Artur, There is only one…one, 2019. Images courtesy the artists and the Serpentine Galleries.

MICHEL AUDER — FICTIONAL ART FILM

Alice Neel, Bill T. JonesAndy WarholTaylor MeadJohn Ashbery, Annie SprinkleDavid Hammons, VivaHannah Wilke, Arthur Aviles, Shirley Clarke, and Willem de Kooning are among the artists, poets, and performers captured on film by their friend Michel Auder during the 1970s and ’80s.

Auder has assembled this footage for his exhibition FICTIONAL ART FILM, now on view in Harlem.

MICHEL AUDER—FICTIONAL ART FILM

Through February 24.

Gavin Brown’s Enterprise

439 West 127th Street, New York City.

Top two and above: Michel Auder—Fictional Art Film (2019), stills. Middle: Michel Auder—Fictional Art Film, 2019, installation view, Gavin Brown’s Enterprise. Images courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise.