Tag Archives: David Kordansky Gallery Los Angeles

RUBY NERI

The exhibition of Ruby Neri’s new large-scale sculptures at David Kordansky will be up for one more week.

“The aura of confidence that animates the sculptures is due in no small part to the physical solidity of clay and Neri’s handling of it. Fusing elements that can be read as handles, for instance, with the limbs of the figures or their ropes of yellow hair, she builds hybridized objects that literalize the implied corporeality of the vessel, thereby emphasizing its centrality in the development of human culture…

“The scale of these works gives them architectural presence as well, generating comparisons to geological formations and trees (some include images of exaggerated flowers), or archaic totems constructed by a matriarchal society. In some cases, bulbous protrusions on their sides contain apertures that permit visual access to their interiors.”*

RUBY NERI*

Through June 15.

David Kordansky Gallery

5130 West Edgewood Place, Los Angeles.

Ruby Neri, ceramic with glaze, from top: Ghosts, 2019 (2); Pietà, 2019 (3); Women with Dolls in Their Laps, 2019 (3); installation view, David Kordansky Gallery, 2019; Untitled, 2019 (2); High Kicker, 2019 (3). Images courtesy and © the artist and David Kordansky Gallery.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND IN CONVERSATION

“In order to move on from the limitations of endless subjectivity, critical postmodern art reduced complex phenomena to a study of cultural form’s and language. Everything became political. With this analysis as a starting point I’m taking a more integral or inclusive stance. I’m not only interested in how images are being read but also in their magic and how they make us feel, how they move us. Even though photography often starts as observation, my dream is a more immersive engagement. I’m an observer longing for intimacy.” — Torbjørn Rødland*

On the opening day of his exhibition FIFTH HONEYMOON in Sweden, join Rødland at Bonniers Konsthall for a conversation with its director Magnus af Petersens.

The show includes the presentation of the artist’s film Between Fork and Ladder.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND and MAGNUS AF PETERSENS IN CONVERSATION

Wednesday, March 13, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND—FIFTH HONEYMOON

March 13 through June 2.

Bonniers Konsthall

Torsgatan 19, Stockholm.

*Rødland to Magnus af Petersens.

From top: Torbjørn Rødland, Anchor, 2017; Torbjørn Rødland, Baby, 2017; Torbjørn Rødland, The Man in the Moon is a Miss, 2016–2018. Images courtesy the artist and the David Kordansky Gallery.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND AT KORDANSKY

Boys, beatings, and blank stares form a backdrop for the mysterious narratives in Torbjørn Rødland’s beautiful new show at David Kordansky.

TORBJØRN RØDLAND—BACKLIT RAINBOW

Through July 7.

David Kordansky Gallery

5130 West Edgewood Place, Los Angeles.

From top: Torbjørn Rødland, Dark Fence, 2016–2018; Torbjørn Rødland, No Climax, 2007–2018; Torbjørn Rødland, Headphones, 2016–2018. Images courtesy the artist and the David Kordansky Gallery.

RASHID JOHNSON

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THE RAINBOW SIGN, the new Rashid Johnson sculpture and collage show at David Kordansky, will be up for one more week.

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RASHID JOHNSON – THE RAINBOW SIGN, through May 19.

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY, 5130 West Edgewood Place, at LaBrea, Los Angeles.

davidkordanskygallery.com/the-rainbow-sign

Rashid Johnson, from top:

Untitled Microphone Sculpture, 2018.

Untitled Escape Collage, 2018.

Untitled Shea Butter Table, 2018.

Image credit: Rashid Johnson and David Kordansky Gallery.

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WILLIAM E. JONES ON ALEXANDER IOLAS

“April 21, 1980

Alexander Iolas was coming to lunch [at the Factory] with a couple of clients and we needed a couple of boys to entertain. And I called James Curley and he brought his cousin David Laughlin, who works at the Coe Kerr Gallery. Iolas arrived, and his contact that he never takes out of his eye got lost, and he had me look for it, but I couldn’t see it….

“August 5, 1982

I introduced [Factory assistant] Robyn to Iolas….Robyn’s such a nice kid but he has no ambition, and he does want to be an artist, so I thought that since Ronnie Cutrone left and things worked out so well for him…that maybe it could happen for Robyn, too. So 74-year-old Iolas grabbed Robyn’s hand….Iolas thought he’d get Robyn’s energy. But I was hoping Robyn got his.” — from The Andy Warhol Diaries*

In FALL INTO RUIN, at David Kordansky in its closing week, writer-photographer-filmmaker-curator-provocateur William E. Jones brings together twenty of his interior photographs of the Athens villa of international art dealer Alexander Iolas. Taken in 1982, they are displayed in hand-coated inkjet prints made this year. Included in the exhibition is Fall into Ruin, Jones’ 30-minute documentary about Iolas, featuring Jones’ narration and stills taken during trips Jones made to Greece in 1982 and 2016.

“Iolas can be credited with mounting Warhol’s first and last gallery show in his lifetime, bringing Surrealism to the United States, and introducing the East Coast to Ed Ruscha. Unlike Iolas’s contemporaries—who included Ileana Sonnabend, Leo Castelli and Bruno Bischofberger—Iolas’s legacy has nearly faded into obscurity after he succumbed to AIDS in 1987, at 80.” — Ann Binlot

WILLIAM E. JONES—

FALL INTO RUIN

Through August 26.

David Kordansky Gallery

5130 West Edgewood Place, Los Angeles.

*Andy Warhol, The Andy Warhol Diaries (New York: Warner Books, 1989), 283, 456.

See “Abandoned Places and Urban Decay, Villa Iolas, Athens.”

From top:

Installation, William E. Jones, from Fall into Ruin, David Kordansky Gallery.

Andy Warhol, Alexander Iolas.

Exhibition poster for show at Alexander Iolas GalleryAndy Warhol, Alexander Iolas.

Installation, William E. Jones, from Fall into Ruin, David Kordansky Gallery.

Images courtesy William E. Jones and David Kordansky Gallery.