Tag Archives: David Zwirner

HILTON ALS — A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN

“Troubled times get the tyrants and prophets they deserve. During our current epoch, the revival of interest in author James Baldwin has been particularly intense. This is in part due, of course, to his ability to analyze and articulate how power abuses through cunning and force and why, in the end, it’s up to the people to topple kingdoms.

“As a galvanizing humanitarian force, Baldwin is now being claimed as a kind of oracle. But by claiming him as such, much gets erased about the great artist in the process, specifically his sexuality and aestheticism, both of which informed his politics.” — Hilton Als*

GOD MADE MY FACE—A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN—a group show curated by Hilton Als, featuring the work of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Alvin Baltrop, Beauford Delaney, Marlene Dumas, Ja’Tovia Gary, Glenn Ligon, Alice Neel, Cameron Rowland, Kara WalkerJane Evelyn Atwood, and James Welling—is on view through mid-February.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Metrograph and Als will present a series of films featuring Baldwin through the years, at home and abroad.

GOD MADE MY FACE—

A COLLECTIVE PORTRAIT OF JAMES BALDWIN*

Through February 16.

David Zwirner

525 and 533 West 19th Street, New York City.

HILTON ALS ON JAMES BALDWIN FILM SERIES

Friday and Saturday, February 1 and 2.

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street, New York City.

See “The Energy of Joy: Hilton Als in conversation with David Bridel and Mary-Alice Daniel,” PARIS LA 16 (2019): 217–221.

From top: Marlene Dumas, James Baldwin, 2014, from the Great Men series exhibited at Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, image credit: Marlene Dumas/Bernard Ruijgrok PiezographicsBeauford Delaney, Dark Rapture, 1941, oil on canvas; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (man sitting), 1975-1986, photograph; Richard AvedonJames Baldwin, writer, Harlem, New York, 1945, © The Richard Avedon Foundation; Ja’Tovia Gary, An Ecstatic Experience, 2015, video still; Jane Evelyn AtwoodJames Baldwin with bust of himself sculpted by Larry Wolhandler, Paris, France, 1975 (detail), gelatin silver print. All images courtesy David Zwirner.

WOLFGANG TILLMANS IN HONG KONG

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Wolfgang Tillmans’ first Hong Kong exhibition is up at David Zwirner, and includes both older work as well as new photographs related to Tillman’s current interest in human obstinance and the devaluation of fact-based information.

 

WOLFGANG TILLMANS, through May 12.

DAVID ZWIRNER, 5-6/F, H Queens, 80 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong.

davidzwirner.com/wolfgang-tillmans

See Wolfgang Tillmans edition of Jahresring:

sternberg-press.com/index

Above: Wolfgang Tillmanshand on ankle, 2018.

Below: Wolfgang Tillmansbrain scan CLC, a, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

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WOLFGANG TILLMANS FOR JAHRESRING

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For its 64th iteration, Jahresring enlisted Wolfgang Tillmans to guest edit an issue, which the photographer has titled “What is Different?”:

“We have known for some time that there are people who feel drawn to esoteric conspiracy theories. What is new, however, is that hard facts are no longer believed by wide segments of the population. During the past two years, I have come to realise that if 30% of the electorate are resistant to rational argument, we are on a slippery slope.

“In light of all this, I wanted to investigate [by interviewing scientists, politicians, journalists, and social workers] why the backfire effect is having more impact today than it did ten, twenty, or forty years ago. What has changed? What is different? This latter phrase became the title of the book.” — Wolfgang Tillmans, in The Guardian*

 

WHAT IS DIFFERENT?, JAHRESRING 64, edited by Wolfgang Tillmans and Brigitte Oetker. Published by Sternberg Press.

sternberg-press.com/index

theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/feb/28/wolfgang-tillmans-what-is-different-backfire-effect

Above: Wolfgang Tillmans, CLC 004, 2017. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/Hong Kong, Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne, and Maureen Paley, London.

Image credit below: Jahresring and Sternberg Press.

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ALICE NEEL, UPTOWN

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Last year Hilton Als curated an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Alice Neel for David Zwirner in New York City (the show then traveled to Victoria Miro in London). The catalogue of paintings is accompanied by Hilton’s subjective texts on art, race, gender, Neel, and the city.

“In ALICE NEEL, UPTOWN, Als brings together a body of paintings and works on paper of African-Americans, Latinos, Asians, and other people of color for the first time. Highlighting the innate diversity of Neel’s approach, the selection looks at those whose portraits are often left out of the art-historical canon and how this extraordinary painter captured them…

“A contemporary and personal approach to the artist’s oeuvre, Als’ project is ‘an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw, but the generosity of her seeing.’ ”*

 

HILTON ALSALICE NEEL, UPTOWN,  forward by Jeremy Lewison (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2017). Available now.

davidzwirnerbooks.com/alice-neel-uptown

From top: Alice Neel, Georgie Arce, 1955. Alice Neel, Uptown layout (Alice Neel, Call Me Joe, 1955). Alice Neel, Mercedes Arroyo, 1952 (detail). Images courtesy of David Zwirner.

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FELIX GONZALEZ–TORRES

“I believe that irony is still a very useful tool to create meaning. For me, irony stops information in its tracks and makes it unravel.” — Felix Gonzalez–Torres*

A visitor to FELIX GONZALEZ–TORRES (at David Zwirner in New York), confronted by a room-dividing wall of glass beads hanging from the ceiling, sticks out his hand and runs it along the length of the curtain, evoking the unmistakable sound of the boudoir. There are stacks of paper to be shared, candy to be eaten, go-go boys to be ogled. The silent scream in the work of Gonzalez-Torres is drowned—unraveled—by laughter.

FELIX GONZALEZ–TORRES, through June 24.

DAVID ZWIRNER, 537 West 20th Street, New York City.

*ArtCenter Talks: Graduate Seminar–The First Decade, 1986–1995, ed. Stan Douglas (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2016).

“A special talk and book event to celebrate the release of [the publication] FELIX GONZALEZ–TORRES: SPECIFIC OBJECTS WITHOUT SPECIFIC FORM will be held at the Fondation Beyeler during Art Basel. Elena Filipovic and Tino Sehgal will be present in conversation about Gonzalez-Torres’s work, the structure of the exhibition, and the publication.

“[This volume] documents the groundbreaking retrospective curated by Filipovic with the artists Danh VoCarol Bove, and Sehgal that traveled to Wiels Contemporary Art Centre in Brussels, Fondation Beyeler in Basel, and MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt in 2010 and 2011.”**

FELIX GONZALEZ–TORRES: SPECIFIC OBJECTS WITHOUT SPECIFIC FORM, Thursday, June 15.

FONDATION BEYELER, Baselstrasse 101, Basel.

artbook.com/9783863359737.html

**davidzwirner.com/exhibitions/felix-gonzalez-torres

For information on the Andrea Rosen Gallery‘s co-representation of the estate of Felix Gonzalez–Torres, see:

artreview.com/news/news_22_feb_17_andrea_rosen_closes_gallery/

Image credit © The Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation. Courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York and David Zwirner, New York/London