Tag Archives: Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

CAP UCLA DANCE SEASON 2019–2020

Alastair Macaulay was unambiguous. Closing his 2018 review of the world premiere of FOUR QUARTETS—a collaboration between choreographer Pam Tanowitz, artist Brice Marden, and composer Kaija Saariaho—with the following paragraph, the former New York Times dance critic made its case for posterity:

If I am right to think this is the greatest creation of dance theater so far this century, we’re fortunate that FOUR QUARTETS will travel to other stages. I long to become more deeply acquainted with the many layers of its stage poetry.

The drawback for Los Angeles audiences is that this landmark work will be performed at Royce Hall in early 2020 only twice—a highlight of a remarkably strong CAP UCLA 2019–2020 dance season.

The season begins at Redcat, where Adam Linder presents THE WANT—a contemporary opera/performance piece based on a play by Bernard-Marie Koltès, with music by Ethan Braun.

Sankai JukuUshio Amagatsu’s all-male troupe of Butoh dancers, performing MEGURI—will be at Royce for one night only, as will Michael Keegan-Dolan’s Teaċ Daṁsa (House of Dance) in a new interpretation of SWAN LAKE, featuring a score by Slow Moving Clouds.

The great ballerina Wendy Whelan will dance at Royce, for two nights, in THE DAY. Choreographed by Lucinda Childs with a score by David Lang, Whelan will be joined onstage by cellist Maya Beiser.

The dance season closes in April 2020 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion with the Dance at the Music Center co-presentation of PALERMO PALERMO, a 1989 work by dance legend Pina Bausch and Tanztheater Wuppertal.

See link below for details.

CAP UCLA 2019–2020 SEASON OF DANCE

From top: Sankai Juku, Meguri; Adam Linder, The Want, photograph by Shahryar Nashat; Michael Keegan-Dolan, Teaċ Daṁsa, Swan Lake, photograph by Colm Hogan; Maya Beiser, Wendy Whelan, Lucinda Childs, and David Lang, The Day; Pina Bausch, Palermo Palermo, photograph by Jochen Viehoff; Pam Tanowitz, Brice Marden, and Kaija Saariaho, Four Quartets, photograph by Maria Baranova. Images courtesy and © the artists and photographers.

ADÈS, MCGREGOR, AND DEAN — WORLD PREMIERES

This weekend at the Music Center, choreographer Wayne McGregor, composer and conductor Thomas Adès, artist Tacita Dean, the Royal Ballet, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic present two world premieres, preceded by a work—OUTLIER—new to West Coast audiences.

LIVING ARCHIVE: AN AI PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENT—danced by Company Wayne McGregor—is a first look at the results of McGregor’s collaboration with Google’s Arts and Culture Lab to develop a choreographic tool that generates new outcomes for works in McGregor’s repertoire. This iteration of LIVING ARCHIVE will be danced to Adès’ In Seven Days, performed by the LA Phil.

The evening will close with the dance world premiere of Part One of McGregor’s full-evening work THE DANTE PROJECT. Set to Adès’ new eponymous composition, INFERNO will be performed by the Royal Ballet, and features a set designed by Tacita Dean—her first work for dancers and the stage—and lighting design by Lucy Carter and Simon Bennison.

ADÈS AND MCGREGOR—A DANCE COLLABORATION

OUTLIER, LIVING ARCHIVE: AN AI PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENT, and THE DANTE PROJECT PART 1 (INFERNO)

Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13, at 7:30 pm.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

135 North Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Wayne McGregor, The Dante Project (Inferno), featuring Royal Ballet dancers Fumi Kaneko and Edward Watson; Watson and company; Calvin Richardson; artists of the Royal Ballet. Wayne McGregor, Living Archive, featuring Company Wayne McGregor dancers Izzac Carroll, Maria Daniela Gonzalez, and Jordan James Bridge; Chien-Shun Liao; Carroll; Rebecca Bassett-Graham and Carroll. Wayne McGregor, Outlier, artists of Company Wayne McGregor; Lauren Cuthbertson, Jacob O’Connell, and Joshua Barwick; Gonzalez, O’Connell, and Bassett-Graham. Photographs by Cheryl Mann, July 12, 2019, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Images courtesy and © Wayne McGregor, Tacita Dean, the Royal Ballet, the Music Center, the photographer, and the performers.

THE ROYAL BALLET — MAYERLING

Forty years after its American premiere at the Shrine Auditorium, Kenneth MacMillan’s MAYERLING—a tour de force of choreographic virtuosity and innovation, and the first full-length ballet constructed around a male lead—returns to Los Angeles for a three-performance engagement by the Royal Ballet at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.

MAYERLING tells the story of Crown Prince Rudolf (1858–1859)—heir apparent to the throne of Austria-Hungary—his mistress Mary Vetsera, and the events leading up to their murder-suicide at Mayerling, the prince’s hunting lodge outside Vienna.

“Most of MacMillan’s ballets, descriptive or abstract, tackle themes of crisis and violence… The dramatic momentum of MAYERLING springs from a chilly dissection of both… The fast-moving scenario is exactly matched by the ferocious pace and energy of MacMillan’s choreography. The action revolves around the startling progression of duets for the two principal dancers: abrasive, threatening, erotic and geared almost without respite to destruction.

“MacMillan projects the dark underside of romanticism: the ballet has domestic interludes of great charm but they’re brief, the dominant mood is acrid, sour, and glitteringly dark.” — Bryan Robertson, The Spectator, February 25, 1978

As Robertson points out, MAYERLING is famous for its numerous pas de deux and requirements of great stamina and artistry by its male leads. On opening night, Royal Ballet principal Ryoichi Hirano will dance the role of Rudolf. On Saturday night principal Matthew Ball takes over, and for the Sunday matinee, principal Thiago Soares is the Crown Prince. Principal Sarah Lamb dances the role of Marie Larisch on opening night and Mary Vetsera on Saturday night.

MacMillan—a former dancer who was the Royal Ballet’s artistic director throughout most of the 1970s and its principal choreographer from 1977 onward—died in 1992 at age 62, backstage at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, during a performance of a revival of MAYERLING.

THE ROYAL BALLET—MAYERLING

Friday and Saturday, July 5 and 6, at 7:30 pm.

Sunday, July 7, at 2 pm.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

135 North Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

MAYERLING program

From top: Ryoichi Hirano as Crown Prince Rudolf and Sarah Lamb as Marie Larisch in Mayerling, photograph by Helen Maybanks; Francesca Hayward as Princess Stephanie and Hirano, photograph by Maybanks; Lamb as Mary Vetsera, photograph by Alice Pennefather; Alexander Campbell as Bratfisch, the prince’s confident, photograph by Maybanks; Lauren Cuthbertson as Mary and Thiago Soares as Rudolf (3), photographs by Maybanks. Images courtesy and © the photographers, the performers, and the Royal Ballet.

LAZARUS — LOS ANGELES PREMIERE

“Nothing prepares you for the totality of Alvin Ailey: the aural, visual, physical, spiritual beauty… Everywhere you looked: sensory pleasure… It dawned on me that I was watching neither high nor low culture but rather a wholly unified thing.” — Zadie Smith, on seeing the Ailey company for the first time.

LAZARUS—the game-changing two-act ballet by choreographer Rennie Harris that created a sensation at its world premiere last year in New York—will be performed twice this week in Los Angeles as Dance at the Music Center welcomes back the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for a spring season.

The work was inspired by the life and legacy of troupe founder Alvin Ailey (1931–1989).

LAZARUS—ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER

Wednesday and Saturday, April 3 and 6.

Shows at 7:30 pm. Dance Talks one hour prior.

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

135 North Grand Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Rennie Harris, Lazarus, 2018, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theaterin performance (2); Jacqueline Green in Lazarus; Michael Jackson, Jr., and Jeroboam Bozeman in Lazarus. Photographs by Paul Kolnik.

MALPASO AT THE WALLIS

In its Los Angeles debut just over a year ago, Malpaso Dance Company performed a contemporary program and at one point were joined onstage at the Dorothy Chandler by Arturo O’Farrill and his Afro Latin Jazz Ensemble.

For their return this week—three nights at the comparatively intimate Bram Goldsmith Theater at The Wallis—the Cuban troupe investigates the archives of high modernism. The performances will open with Jamie Scott’s restaging of Merce Cunningham’s FIELDING SIXES—music by John Cage—which premiered at Sadler’s Wells in 1980.

Ohad Naharin went to Havana last year to collaborate with Malpaso in its restaging of Naharin’s thirty-year-old masterwork TABULA RASA, which will close the shows.

Rounding out the program are Malpaso artistic director and co-founder Osnel Delgado’s OCASO, and company member Beatriz García’s new work SER (BEING).

On opening night, join the artists for a post-performance talk-back.

MALPASO DANCE COMPANY

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, March 28, 29, and 30.

All shows at 7:30 pm.

Bram Goldsmith Theater

Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

9390 Santa Monica Boulevard North, Beverly Hills.

Malpaso Dance Company. Photographs by Lawrence K. Ho.