Tag Archives: Douglas Crimp

FIRE AT BABY COMPANY

“Every time I enter a new room I scan for other queers. Maybe it’s a hunt for fleeting solidarity, maybe safety—not that the two are opposed. I didn’t know I did this until I didn’t have to, when I arrived in a place—[Fire Island]—where queer and its variants was the baseline. It is a profound experience, one I will never take for granted, even as I know the exclusions it enacts.

“This is a very personal show, in the sense that it has no pretensions of thoroughness or coherence. A series of friendships and encounters organized around a shared experience of finding one’s place. Just some people inhabiting a tiny speck of the world and—to borrow a phrase by Douglas Crimp, another friend from the island—misfitting together.” — Ryan McNamara*

McNamara brings Fire Island to Manhattan with a new exhibition of work by Travis BoyerJack BruscaTM DavyRaúl de NievesNicole EisenmanK8 HardyKia LabeijaMatthew LeifheitHanna LidenTiffany MalakootiSamuel RoeckPaul Mpagi SepuyaDevan ShimoyamaA.L. SteinerWolfgang TillmansCajsa von Zeipel, and himself.

FIRE*

Through April 14.

Baby Company

73 Allen Street, New York City.

*”Misfitting together” is a quote from Popism: The Warhol Sixties, by Andy Warhol and Pat Hackett (1980), referenced by Douglas Crimp in his book “Our Kind of Movie”: The Films of Andy Warhol (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2012), 157, note 29:

“I [Warhol] was reflecting that most people thought the Factory was a place where everybody had the same attitudes about everything; the truth was, we were all odds-and-ends misfits, somehow misfitting together.”

From top: Ryan McNamara, Cemical Compound (6/8/2018), 2019, wood, plaster, paint, psilocybin, amyl nitrate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, Truvada; Wolfgang Tillmans, Far away inside (Echo Beach), 2017, inkjet print; Matthew Leifheit; Meat Rack Gathering, 2018, dye sublimation print on aluminum; Nicole Eisenman and Tiffany Malakooti, Remarkable Lesbian Chess Set, 2016, clay, wood, and paint; A.L. Steiner, Untitled (Rachel on bay, Pines), 2016–2019; Fire installation view with K8 Hardy‘s jockstrap collection—Look Pines, 2016, fiberglass mannequin, metal base, cloth, enamel paint, synthetic wig—in foreground; Devan Shimoyama, Untitled, 2015–2018, dye-sublimation print on aluminum (2); Cajsa von Zeipel, Boy’s Tears, 2019, styrofoam, fiberglass, aqua resin, plaster; Travis Boyer, Le Fountain, 2019, embellished and dyed wool blanket on beeswax, wood, and steel frame; Jack Brusca, Pines Pavilion Logo, 1980, acrylic on canvas; Kia LaBeija, New Legend Lucky 007 on Fire Island, 2018, digital inkjet print.

INGA LĀCE AT LAXART

Inga Lāce—a curator from Riga whose practice connects the art/historical with the social/political—will give a talk at LAXART this week and present AMERICA IS NOT READY FOR THIS, the artist Karol Radziszewski’s 2012 film that takes as its starting point the 1977 trip Natalia LL made to New York City.

“Radziszewski revives Natalia LL’s memories, confronting both Polish and Western narratives of art history and raising a series of questions on issues such as gender, feminist art, conceptual art, and queer and East-West relations and their impact on the art world in the context of the period of the Iron Curtain.

“The film is both a search for parallels between the artistic experiences of Natalia LL and Radziszewski, as well as an attempt to examine the rules governing the positioning of artists in the art world, both in the 1970s and today.”*

Included in the film are interviews with Carolee SchneemannVito Acconci, AA Bronson, Douglas Crimp, Antonio Homem, and Mario Montez.

CURATORIAL TALK AND FILM SCREENING WITH INGA LĀCE*

Wednesday, November 7, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

LAXART

7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood.

Top: Inga Lāce. Image credit: LAXART.

Above: Karol Radziszewski, America is Not Ready for This material.

Below: Karol Radziszewski, Karol and Natalia LL, 2011. Image credit: Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw.

CRAIG OWENS LAUNCH AND PANEL

A newly edited and updated version of Craig Owens’ 1984 interview with Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield has been published by Badlands Unlimited.

Join Lynne Tillman, Thomas Beard, and Horsfield for CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC, a book launch and panel discussion with Paul Chan and Johanna Burton at the New Museum.

Owens (1950–1990) was an associate editor at October and a senior editor at Art in America. His essays are collected in Beyond RecognitionRepresentation, Power, and Culture (1994).

In his memoir Before Pictures, Douglas Crimp describes the quality of Owen’s “unrestrained intellectual enthusiasm.”:

“In many of our late-night phone calls… [Owens] would say something like, ‘I’m writing a brilliant essay on…’—on whatever it was he was working on at the moment. I was at first taken aback by his apparent immodesty, but I grew to understand and appreciate his elation at the process of his own thinking, sparked by his voracious reading.” — Douglas Crimp*

CRAIG OWENS—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CRITIC

Launch and panel

Friday, March 2, at 7 pm.

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York City.

* Douglas Crimp, “Agon,” in Before Pictures (Brooklyn: Dancing Foxes Press/Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016), 213.

From top: Craig Owens, 1982, from the series Art World, photograph © Timothy Greenfield-SandersCraig Owens photographed by Barbara Kruger in her loft, 1988, image credit New Museum.

DOUGLAS CRIMP — BEFORE PICTURES

fea-douglas-crimp1

“What I had hoped to do from the beginning was to complicate the narratives that we have about the art that was made in New York in the 1970s and about the political developments of the gay scene and public sexual culture in that period of time….The queer world and art world complicate each other, but also the anecdotal voice complicates the critical voice.” — Douglas Crimp, on BEFORE PICTURES*

Pictures—the exhibition Douglas Crimp curated at Artists Space in 1977—launched Robert Longo, Troy Brauntuch, Sherrie Levine, Jack Goldstein, and Philip Smith, and laid the groundwork for the 2009 Met survey The Pictures Generation.

As the managing editor of October from 1977 to 1989, Crimp edited a special issue on AIDS for the journal in 1987. He is the author of “Our Kind of Movie”: The Films of AndyWarhol (2012 ), and last year he published BEFORE PICTURES, a beautifully written, extensively illustrated memoir of his life as a New York art critic and man about town in the 1960s and 70s.

BEFORE PICTURES is a strange and shimmering chimera: Part memoir, part theory, it swerves and circles, often paragraph to paragraph, from anecdote to argument and back again, a graceful, unfussy waltz that sometimes seduces you into thinking that it’s ‘simply’ autobiography. But the writing is also a performance of the necessary entanglement between serious thought and its ‘decor’—an entanglement that fascinates Crimp, and that makes him such an exceptional protagonist.” — David Velasco**

 

DOUGLAS CRIMP—BEFORE PICTURES (Brooklyn: Dancing Foxes Press/Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016).

Available at Skylight Books in Los Feliz, and Book Soup in West Hollywood.

dfpress.us/projects

press.uchicago.edu/book

 

*Sarah Cowan, “Before Pictures: An Interview with Douglas Crimp,” The Paris Review, November 8, 2016:

theparisreview.org/interview-douglas-crimp

**David Velasco, “Douglas Crimp’s Before Pictures,” Artforum, March 2017.

Above: Douglas Crimp, circa 1971, at the Guggenheim in New York, photographer unknown. Image credit: Douglas CrimpBefore Pictures.

Below: Cover photo, Zoe Leonard, Downtown (for Douglas), 2016.

douglas-crimp-cover