Tag Archives: Édouard Glissant

A GRAMMAR BUILT WITH ROCKS

A GRAMMAR BUILT WITH ROCKS—a two-part group exhibition at Human Resources and ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries, curated by Shoghig Halajian and Suzy Halajian—“presents artistic practices that trace the racialized and gendered relationship between bodies and land, and question narratives of socioecological crisis that contribute to the displacement and erasure of people and collective formations.

“The project appropriates its title from Édouard Glissant’s writingsas it looks to the ways in which the landscape contains, unfolds, and narrates its own history.”*

In a related program, Jumana Manna’s WILD RELATIVES (2018) will screen at Redcat in December.

A GRAMMAR BUILT WITH ROCKS

Through November 4.

Human Resources, 410 Cottage Home Street, Chinatown, Los Angeles.

 

Through December 22.

ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries*

909 West Adams Boulevard, Los Angeles.
.
Monday, December 10, at 8:30 pm.
Redcat, 631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.
Top: Cauleen SmithRemote Viewing, 2009, video still, 15:13 min. Courtesy of the artist, Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago, and Kate Werble Gallery, New York.
Above: Film still from Wild Relatives, directed by Jumana Manna. Image courtesy the artist and Redcat.
Below: Pauline Boudry and Renate LorenzToxic, 2012. Installation with Super 16mm film / HD, 13 minutes and archive. Courtesy the artists.

FRANK BOWLING — ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES

Okwui Enwezor, director of Haus der Kunst, welcomes artists Sonia Boyce and Ellen Gallagher, DIA curator Courtney J. Martin, artists and filmmakers Isaac Julien and Steve McQueen, and professors J. Michael Dash and David Scott to THE SEA IS HISTORY—ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES.

This symposium—moderated by Mark Nash and Allison Thompson—examines “the intersection of the artistic, theoretical, literary, and cultural dimensions” in the work of Frank Bowling, the Guyanese-born, London-based artist whose work is “deeply connected to, and inflected by Édouard Glissant’s notion of a ‘Caribbean Discourse’—the idea that the entire critical literature and art created within the historical complex of the Black Atlantic is an ongoing process of philosophical reflection.”*

 

THE SEA IS HISTORY—ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES, Friday, October 20, 11 am to 7 pm.

HAUS DER KUNST, Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

*For complete program, see:  hausderkunst.de/en/learn/symposium/2017/sea-is-history/program/

Also see:  royalacademy.org.uk/artist/frank-bowling-ra

From top:

Frank Bowling, Wintergreens, 1986; Frank Bowling exhibition catalogue; Frank Bowling.

Image credit: The Royal Academy, London.

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K. J. HOLMES AND KATHY WESTWATER

Cathy Weis—through Cathy Weis Projects—curates new performances and supports the creation and presentation of new work. Her SUNDAYS ON BROADWAY events in Soho, which are free and open to the public, provide an invaluable platform for dancers, singers, musicians, writers, and performance artists.

On Sunday, May 28, dance artist, vocalist, actor, and educator K. J. Holmes will “improvise her past, present, and future works to create mythologies of the personal as she brings down to earth embodiments of current concerns and events,” incorporating texts from Édouard Glissant’s Poetics of Relation.*

Also on the bill is Kathy Westwater, performing BRACKISH, a piece for three dancers, which will “take apart and reconstruct her latest work, ANYWHERE, which asks how a dance might engage with, and itself be, a monument.”*

There are no reservations. Seating is first come, first served, and there is no late seating.

K. J. HOLMES and KATHY WESTWATER—SUNDAYS ON BROADWAY, Sunday, May 28, at 6 pm.

WEIS ACRES, 537 Broadway, at Spring Street, # 3, New York City.

*cathyweis.org

kjholmes.info

kathywestwater.org

movementresearch.org

K. J. Holmes. Photograph by Vojtěch Brtnický. Image credit: Movement Research

K. J. Holmes. Photograph by Vojtěch Brtnický. Image credit: Movement Research

K. J. Holmes
Photograph by Vojtěch Brtnický
Image credit: Movement Research