Tag Archives: Egyptian Theatre

HARMONY KORINE IN CONVERSATION

“I am always thinking about the cinema experience. That’s why I haven’t made television yet. Television is a writer’s medium. Not to say there aren’t good things in it, but television—no matter how good it is—is underwhelming. The size of it, and sitting in your living room. It’s pedestrian, whereas cinema is magic, it’s huge, it envelops you, and there’s something completely sensory when it works.” — Harmony Korine

On the eve of the release of The Beach Bum—his sixth feature—join Korine in Hollywood this week for two nights of double features and between-film conversations.

This American Cinematheque presentation of Korine’s films from the last twenty years includes his masterpiece Spring Breakers. All films will be screened in 35mm.

GUMMO and JULIEN DONKEY-BOY

Tuesday, March 19, at 7:30 pm.

TRASH HUMPERS and SPRING BREAKERS

Wednesday, March 20, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

From top: Rachel Korine in Spring Breakers; Bunny Boy in Gummo; Ewen Bremner in Julien Donkey-Boy; Trash Humpers. Images courtesy the artist, A24, Warner Bros., and Drag City.

WAR AND PEACE

In its expression of the epic, cinema has shifted from the battlefield to the computer, generating worlds beyond belief from bits of code. Hollywood—forever wary of the shrinking screen—embraced the live-action epic as a foundational genre, grown spectacular in the 1950s in a thwarted attempt to divert audiences from their newly purchased television sets. Millions of dollars were spent, millions were often lost, and even the masters of the form—Cecil B. DeMille, Stanley Kubrick, Akira Kurosawa, David Lean—were constrained by time, budget, and the whims of their producers.

No such limitations impeded the completion of Sergey Bondarchuk’s WAR AND PEACE (1966), the greatest epic in cinematic history and a Cold War triumph of Soviet filmmaking. This seven-hour retelling of Leo Tolstoy’s work was filmed over the course of five years, cost $100,000,000 (pre-inflation), and employed over 100,000 actors—including regiments of Red Army troops who precisely re-enacted Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

So, the battles are here—as is the jaw-dropping sacking and burning of Moscow—but so are the day-to-day dramas of Bondarchuk’s three aristocratic protagonists: Prince Andrei (Vyacheslav Tikhonov), Natasha (dancer Ludmila Savelyeva), and Pierre (Bondarchuk himself). For Tolstoy, WAR AND PEACE was more of a philosophical explication than a novel, and Bondarchuk does not neglect the author’s theoretical digressions motivation, will, memory, and regret.

This weekend in Santa Monica, the American Cinematheque presents a screening of a new digital restoration of this four-part masterpiece, with an encore in Hollywood in April.

WAR AND PEACE

Sunday, March 10, at 2 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

Saturday, April 27, at 2 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

War and Peace stills courtesy Mosfilm. From top: firing squad; Ludmila Savelyeva (right) as Natasha at her first society ball; Vyacheslav Tikhonov, as Andrei, on the battlefield (2); religious procession.

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS(1960)—Luchino Visconti’s sixth feature—marked a return to the director’s neo-realist roots while simultaneously advancing the grand style he adopted in the mid-1950s with Senso.

“One of the most sumptuous black-and-white pictures I’ve ever seen.” — Martin Scorsese

This epic story of a southern Italian family transplanted to Milan stars Annie Girardot, Claudia Cardinale, Katina Paxinou, and—on the male side—a veritable Alasdair McLellan portfolio avant la lettre, led by Alain Delon in the title role of Rocco Parondi.*

“Like all migrants, they are in search of opportunity, but instead they find an environment that only magnifies their respective strengths and weaknesses.” — Scott Eyman

As part of the American Cinematheque series Luchino Visconti—Cinematic Nobility—co-presented by Luce CinecittàROCCO will screen twice this month in a DCP restored by Cineteca di Bologna in association with Titanus.

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS

Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Saturday, March 30, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

*When a judge with the same name threatened to sue the filmmakers, the family name “Pafundi” in the original negative was changed, post-production, to “Parondi.”

From top: Alain Delon in Rocco and His Brothers; Renato Salvatori as brother Simone and Annie Girardot as Nadia; Luchino Visconti (second from left) on set; Max Cartier, as brother Ciro, and Delon; Salvatori (left), Visconti, Claudia Cardinale as Ginetta, and Delon on set; Delon, with Rocco Vidolazzi as younger brother Luca.

MALCOLM LE GRICE IN LOS ANGELES

Malcolm Le Grice—”one of the most compellingly original and radical artist-theorists in the history of the post-war moving image”—will be in Los Angeles for the next week or so.

During this rare visit Le Grice and Los Angeles Film Forum will present his work around town in a series of venues, including the world premiere of the new edit of his immersive multi-screen piece FINITO at the Spielberg Theatre.

See links below for locations. Le Grice—author of Experimental Cinema in the Digital Age— will be on hand to talk with the audience at all three programs.

MALCOLM LE GRICE AT USC

Thursday, February 14, at 7 pm.

USC School of Cinematic Arts 

Broccoli Theatre

900 West 34th Street, Los Angeles.

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MALCOLM LE GRICE—HERE AND NOW

Sunday, February 17, at 7:30 pm.

Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

MALCOLM LE GRICE—BEFORE AND AFTER CINEMA

Monday, February 11, at 8:30 pm.

Redcat

631 West 2nd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

From top: Malcolm Le Grice, Berlin Horse (1970); Malcolm Le GriceHorror Film 1 (1971); Le Grice presenting his work in Europe, early 2000s; Malcolm Le Grice, Marking Time, 2015; Malcolm Le Grice, Reign of the Vampire, 1970; Le Grice in the early 1970s; Malcolm Le Grice, Threshold (1972). All images © Malcolm Le Grice and courtesy the artist.

VISCONTI — THE LEOPARD

The American Cinematheque begins its series Luchino Visconti—Cinematic Nobility with the epic masterpiece THE LEOPARD, an apotheosis of the director’s social and aesthetic predilections.

The film stars Burt Lancaster as a Bourbon prince in Risorgimento-era Italy hoping to forestall the end of his aristocratic way of life—under threat by Garibaldi and his redshirts—with the marriage of his nephew (Alain Delon) to a rich merchant’s daughter (Claudia Cardinale).

Based on the classic novel by Giuseppe di Lampedusa, THE LEOPARD will screen twice during the series in a DCP beautifully restored by the Cineteca di Bologna and co-presented by Luce Cinecittà.

THE LEOPARD

Thursday, February 7, at 7:30 pm.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles.

Friday, March 29, at 7:30 pm.

Aero Theatre

1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica.

From top: Burt Lancaster as Prince Don Fabrizio Salina in The LeopardAlain Delon as Tancredi Falconeri and Claudia Cardinale as Angelica; Lancaster with a tailor on set; Garibaldi’s redshirts; costumes for The Leopard were designed by Piero Tosi and Umberto Tirelli; Lancaster and Cardinale in the film’s ballroom dance scene.