Tag Archives: Ellen Gallagher

ELLEN GALLAGHER AT HAUSER & WIRTH

In conjunction with the exhibition ELLEN GALLAGHER—ACCIDENTAL RECORDS, the artist will be joined by Christine Y. Kim—associate curator of contemporary art at LACMA—for a conversation about Gallagher’s new work, a series of drawings and paintings which “extend her exploration of the complex histories of the Black Atlantic and the afterlives of the Middle Passage.”*

ACCIDENTAL RECORDS is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with texts by Adrienne Edwards and Philip Hoare.

 

ELLEN GALLAGHER IN CONVERSATION WITH CHRISTINE Y. KIM, Sunday, November 5, at 3 pm.

ELLEN GALLAGHER—ACCIDENTAL RECORDS, through January 28.

HAUSER & WIRTH LOS ANGELES, 901 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*hauserwirthlosangeles.com/

Artwork © Ellen Gallagher, and courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photograph by Ernst Moritz.

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ELLEN GALLAGHER AND TERRANCE HAYES IN CONVERSATION

This week—as part of their fall conversation series—the Academy of American Poets welcomes artist Ellen Gallagher and Academy Chancellor Terrance Hayes for “a conversation on poetry responding to art, art responding to the times, and more,” at Housing Works in Manhattan.*

ELLEN GALLAGHER and TERRANCE HAYES, Wednesday, October 25, at 7 pm.

HOUSING WORKS BOOKSTORE AND CAFE, 126 Crosby Street, New York City.

housingworks.org/events/ellen-gallagher-terrance-hayes

Ellen Gallagher. Photograph by Philippe Vogelenzang.

ellen_gallagher

 

 

FRANK BOWLING — ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES

Okwui Enwezor, director of Haus der Kunst, welcomes artists Sonia Boyce and Ellen Gallagher, DIA curator Courtney J. Martin, artists and filmmakers Isaac Julien and Steve McQueen, and professors J. Michael Dash and David Scott to THE SEA IS HISTORY—ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES.

This symposium—moderated by Mark Nash and Allison Thompson—examines “the intersection of the artistic, theoretical, literary, and cultural dimensions” in the work of Frank Bowling, the Guyanese-born, London-based artist whose work is “deeply connected to, and inflected by Édouard Glissant’s notion of a ‘Caribbean Discourse’—the idea that the entire critical literature and art created within the historical complex of the Black Atlantic is an ongoing process of philosophical reflection.”*

 

THE SEA IS HISTORY—ART AND BLACK ATLANTIC CULTURES, Friday, October 20, 11 am to 7 pm.

HAUS DER KUNST, Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

*For complete program, see:  hausderkunst.de/en/learn/symposium/2017/sea-is-history/program/

Also see:  royalacademy.org.uk/artist/frank-bowling-ra

From top:

Frank Bowling, Wintergreens, 1986; Frank Bowling exhibition catalogue; Frank Bowling.

Image credit: The Royal Academy, London.

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POWER AT SPRÜTH MAGERS

“The cultural contributions of women and women of color are still underrepresented in the art world, and we are still asked to contextualize our practice in ways that other privileged artists simply are not.” — Shinique Smith*

“I have recently been exploring the idea of doing my work in secret. I was inspired by discovering the work of The United Order of Tents. They are a secret society of black nurses. They have supported each other and done good works since the Civil War. The Mother Emmanuel Church met in secret for 35 years, while black churches were banned in South Carolina after the Nat Turner rebellion.

“I don’t really have time to explain my work to people who feel that I have an identity and they don’t. I don’t have time to unpack all that. I’m focused on using black feminist theory or any other tools that can help me sharpen my knife, and make better work.” — Simone Leigh*

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, a survey of over 60 works by 37 artists—including Ellen Gallagher, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Betye Saar, Ntozake ShangeMickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems—is now on view at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles.

The exhibition, curated by Todd Levin, also includes a selection of images from the Ralph DeLuca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography.

 

POWER: WORK BY AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN FROM THE NINETEENTH CENTURY TO NOW, through June 10.

SPRÜTH MAGERS, 5900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

 

*Artists’ quotes from Power, the booklet published on the occasion of the exhibition:

spruethmagers.com/exhibitions/445

ALSO SEE: theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/05/kara-walker-karon-davis-power-black-female-artists

The participating artists: Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Sonya Clark, Renee Cox, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Karon Davis, Minnie Evans, Nona Faustine, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ellen Gallagher, Leslie Hewitt, Clementine Hunter, Steffani Jemison, Jennie C. Jones, Simone Leigh, Julie Mehretu, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Sondra Perry, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Joyce J. Scott, Emmer Sewell, Ntozake Shange, Xaviera Simmons, Lorna Simpson, Shinique Smith, Renee Stout, Mickalene Thomas, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Kara Walker, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Carrie Mae Weems, and Brenna Youngblood.

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014 Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood 243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm 96 x 20 x 20 inches Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0023 (Totem), 2014
Clothing, fabric, accesories, ribbon, rope, and wood
243.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
96 x 20 x 20 inches
Image credit: Shinique Smith and Sprüth Magers