Tag Archives: Gagosian Gallery

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Fourteen at-risk non-profit visual arts organizations in New York City—Artists Space, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Dia Art Foundation, the The Drawing CenterEl Museo del BarrioHigh Line Art, MoMA PS1, New Museum, Public Art Fund, Queens Museum, Sculpture Center, the The Studio Museum in Harlem, Swiss Institute, and White Columns—will benefit from the sale of artwork made available as part of the Hauser & Wirth initiative ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK.

Two non-profit charitable partners are also supported: The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts (FCA).

Located at the gallery’s two New York locations and online, more than 100 artists are participating in the project, including Rita Ackermann, Kelly Akashi, Ida Applebroog, Genesis Belanger, Lynda Benglis, Katherine Bernhardt, Huma Bhabha, Carol Bove, Katherine Bradford, Sam Falls, Charles Gaines, Maureen Gallace, Joanne Greenbaum, Mona Hatoum, Mary Heilmann, Camille Henrot, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Shara Hughes, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Sanya Kantarovsky, June Leaf, Simone Leigh, Zoe Leonard, Glenn Ligon, Sam McKinniss, Marilyn Minter, Sarah Morris, Angel Otero, Adam Pendleton, Elizabeth Peyton, Jack Pierson, R.H. Quaytman, Deborah Roberts, Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, Tschabalala Self, Amy Sherald, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Laurie Simmons, Taryn Simon, Lorna Simpson, Avery Singer, Sarah Sze, Kara Walker, Mary Weatherford, and the estate of Anne Truitt.

See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR NEW YORK

Through October 22.

Hauser & Wirth

548 West 22nd Street, New York City.

32 East 69th Street, New York City.

From top: Lorna Simpson, Haze, 2019, ink and screenprint on gessoed fiberglass, photograph by James Wang, image courtesy and © the artist and Hauser & Wirth; Kelly Akashi, Feel Me (Flesh), 2020, hand-blown glass and bronze, image courtesy and © the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles; Mary Weatherford, Meeting in the Forest, 2019, flashe and neon on linen, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen Studio, image courtesy and © the artist, David Kordansky Gallery, and Gagosian; Rashid Johnson, Standing Broken Men, 2020, ceramic tile, mirror tile, spray enamel, oil soap, black stick, wax, photograph by Martin Parsekian, image courtesy and © the artist; Jack Pierson, Inquire Within, 2020, metal and wood, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Angel Otero, Sleepy Fire, 2020, oil paint and fabric collaged on canvas, image courtesy and © Lehmann Maupin; Jenny Holzer, from Survival (1983–85), 2020, photograph by Graham Kelman, image courtesy and © the artist and Artist Rights Society (ARS).


JONAS WOOD BOOK SIGNING

JONAS WOOD—a Phaidon publication, and the artist’s first monograph—is out now. This week, join Wood at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA for a book signing.

The extensively illustrated volume includes essays by Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer, and a conversation between Wood and Mark Grotjahn.

JONAS WOOD BOOK SIGNING

Thursday, December 12, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

152 North Central Avenue, downtown Los Angeles.

Jonas Wood, 2019, Phaidon. Images courtesy and © the artist, the publisher, Gagosian, and David Kordansky Gallery. Bball Studio, 2019—the black-and-white etching of the book cover image—is a print (200 copies) included in the special hardcover limited edition of JONAS WOOD, the proceeds of which benefited the Oakland-based non-profit Creative Growth.

FRANKENTHALER IN VENICE

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992—an exhibition at Palazzo Grimani—is the first presentation of her work in Venice since the 33rd Biennale in 1966.

Curated by John Elderfield, the show features fourteen works and “focuses on the artist’s development of the pittura (painting) and the panorama: the interplay between works like easel paintings, although made on the floor, and large, horizontal paintings that open onto shallow but expansive spaces, in the way that panoramas do.”*

“There are no rules. I’d rather risk an ugly surprise than rely on things I know I can do. Art has a will of its own. You have to know how to use the accident, how to recognize it, how to control it, and ways to eliminate it so that the whole surface looks felt and born all at once.” — Helen Frankenthaler

PITTURA/PANORAMA—PAINTINGS BY HELEN FRANKENTHALER, 1952–1992*

Through November 17.

Palazzo Grimani

Ramo Grimani 4858, Venice.

From top: Helen FrankenthalerRiverhead, 1963, acrylic on canvas; Frankenthaler (center) in Venice in 1966 for the 33rd Biennale; Helen FrankenthalerMaelstrom, 1992, acrylic on canvas; Helen FrankenthalerFor E.M., 1981, acrylic on canvas (“E.M.” is Édouard Manet); Frankenthaler pouring paint—her “soak-stain” technique—onto a large unprimed canvas, photographs by Ernest Haas (2): images from the exhibition catalog Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, published by Gagosian, 2019 (3); Helen FrankenthalerOpen Wall, 1953, oil on unsized, unprimed canvas; Frankenthaler in her studio at Third Avenue and East 94th Street, New York City, with  Mediterranean Thoughts (1960, in progress, left) and Figure with Thoughts (1960, in progress, center), March 1960, photograph by Tony Vaccaro. Images of Frankenthaler works were photographed by Rob McKeever and are courtesy and © the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc., Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Gagosian, 2019.

SETSUKO KLOSSOWSKA DE ROLA

“The [ceramics] collaboration with Astier de Villatte began five years ago, but my friendship with the owners, especially Benoit, goes back a long time… I work with their Tibetan artisans. I make samples first and then we work together to add the volume, especially on the large trees, which are about a metre tall. The artisans are always singing or chanting; I feel very serene when I’m with them.” — Setsuko Klossowska de Rola

INTO THE TREES—an exhibition of sculptures and paintings by Setsuko at Gagosian Paris—showcases the artist’s recent ceramics and bronzes.

SETSUKO—INTO THE TREES

Through June 1.

Gagosian Paris

4 rue de Ponthieu, 8th, Paris.

See Dorothée Perret, “Setsuko and the Magic Kimono,” portraits by Katerina Jebb, PARIS LA 16 (2018): 77–83.

From top: Setsuko, Retour, 2015–2016, terra cotta; Into the Trees installation view, Gagosian Paris, 2019; Setsuko, Chemin de vigne, 2016–2017, enameled terra cotta; Katerina Jebb, Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, 2018, image from PARIS LA 16; Setsuko, Souvenir d’une vie 2, 2015–2016. Artwork images © Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, artwork photographs by Zarko Vijatovic, courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

JOHN RICHARDSON

“On February 6, 1954—not quite halfway through my twelve years with Douglas [Cooper]—I turned thirty. Douglas planned a birthday celebration that would also serve as a belated housewarming. But on February 5, the arctic chill that had paralysed much of Europe turned even fiercer, and for the first time in decades Castille was beautifully blanketed with a heavy fall of snow… We put the party off until Easter.

“On Easter Sunday… some of us went to the bullfight… In the course of the corrida, Picasso and Jacqueline [Roque] announced that they and the rest of their group—sixteen in all, including Picasso’s son, Paulo… and Jean Cocteau, plus entourage—would like to dine at Castille; he also announced that he had a present for us… an Ingresque drawing that had obsessed me ever since I first saw it pinned on a wall at Le Fournas: an uncompromisingly frontal image of a naked girl, legs wide apart, seated like an odalisque on a pile of cushions. It had been heavily worked. To create highlights and smudge shadows, Picasso used an eraser—a device he admitted borrowing from Matisse… I was surprised at his giving us something so personal until I realized that the gift must have been made at Jacqueline’s behest. She would have had every reason to want this erotic image removed from the studio wall: it represented one of her rivals, Geneviève Laporte. Characteristically, Picasso brought the drawing in the box that had contained the Dior wrap we had given Jacqueline for Christmas. No less characteristically, he kept the box; he liked to incorporate emballage in his work. As Picasso handed over the drawing, he said, presciently, ‘When you two split up, you’re going to have to cut it in half.’ After we broke up, Douglas simply kept it. Sadly, the drawing disappeared when Castille was burgled some years later. So far as I know, it’s still in the hands of the Mafia.” — John Richardson*

The writer, curator, collector, raconteur, art world insider, and great Picasso biographer John Richardson died in Manhattan this week. Volume IV of A Life of Picasso was nearly complete at the time of its author’s death, and should be published later this year.

*John Richardson, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999), 203–204.

Also see John Richardson, “Picasso: The Mediterranean Years,” in Picasso: The Mediterranean Years, 1945–1962 , exh. cat. (London: Gagosian Gallery/New York: Rizzoli, 2010), 11–45.

From top: John Richardson (left) and Pablo Picasso, photograph by André Villers (detail), courtesy Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and ADAGP, Paris; Andy Warhol, John Richardson, courtesy Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Richardson with Nan Kempner at the Met Gala, circa 1980, photograph by Patrick McMullan; Richardson (right) with Boaz Mazor, circa 1975, photograph by Bob Colacello.