Tag Archives: Gagosian Gallery

SETSUKO KLOSSOWSKA DE ROLA

“The [ceramics] collaboration with Astier de Villatte began five years ago, but my friendship with the owners, especially Benoit, goes back a long time… I work with their Tibetan artisans. I make samples first and then we work together to add the volume, especially on the large trees, which are about a metre tall. The artisans are always singing or chanting; I feel very serene when I’m with them.” — Setsuko Klossowska de Rola

INTO THE TREES—an exhibition of sculptures and paintings by Setsuko at Gagosian Paris—showcases the artist’s recent ceramics and bronzes.

SETSUKO—INTO THE TREES

Through June 1.

Gagosian Paris

4 rue de Ponthieu, 8th, Paris.

See Dorothée Perret, “Setsuko and the Magic Kimono,” portraits by Katerina Jebb, PARIS LA 16 (2018): 77–83.

From top: Setsuko, Retour, 2015–2016, terra cotta; Into the Trees installation view, Gagosian Paris, 2019; Setsuko, Chemin de vigne, 2016–2017, enameled terra cotta; Katerina Jebb, Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, 2018, image from PARIS LA 16; Setsuko, Souvenir d’une vie 2, 2015–2016. Artwork images © Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, artwork photographs by Zarko Vijatovic, courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

JOHN RICHARDSON

“On February 6, 1954—not quite halfway through my twelve years with Douglas [Cooper]—I turned thirty. Douglas planned a birthday celebration that would also serve as a belated housewarming. But on February 5, the arctic chill that had paralysed much of Europe turned even fiercer, and for the first time in decades Castille was beautifully blanketed with a heavy fall of snow… We put the party off until Easter.

“On Easter Sunday… some of us went to the bullfight… In the course of the corrida, Picasso and Jacqueline [Roque] announced that they and the rest of their group—sixteen in all, including Picasso’s son, Paulo… and Jean Cocteau, plus entourage—would like to dine at Castille; he also announced that he had a present for us… an Ingresque drawing that had obsessed me ever since I first saw it pinned on a wall at Le Fournas: an uncompromisingly frontal image of a naked girl, legs wide apart, seated like an odalisque on a pile of cushions. It had been heavily worked. To create highlights and smudge shadows, Picasso used an eraser—a device he admitted borrowing from Matisse… I was surprised at his giving us something so personal until I realized that the gift must have been made at Jacqueline’s behest. She would have had every reason to want this erotic image removed from the studio wall: it represented one of her rivals, Geneviève Laporte. Characteristically, Picasso brought the drawing in the box that had contained the Dior wrap we had given Jacqueline for Christmas. No less characteristically, he kept the box; he liked to incorporate emballage in his work. As Picasso handed over the drawing, he said, presciently, ‘When you two split up, you’re going to have to cut it in half.’ After we broke up, Douglas simply kept it. Sadly, the drawing disappeared when Castille was burgled some years later. So far as I know, it’s still in the hands of the Mafia.” — John Richardson*

The writer, curator, collector, raconteur, art world insider, and great Picasso biographer John Richardson died in Manhattan this week. Volume IV of A Life of Picasso was nearly complete at the time of its author’s death, and should be published later this year.

*John Richardson, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999), 203–204.

Also see John Richardson, “Picasso: The Mediterranean Years,” in Picasso: The Mediterranean Years, 1945–1962 , exh. cat. (London: Gagosian Gallery/New York: Rizzoli, 2010), 11–45.

From top: John Richardson (left) and Pablo Picasso, photograph by André Villers (detail), courtesy Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and ADAGP, Paris; Andy Warhol, John Richardson, courtesy Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Richardson with Nan Kempner at the Met Gala, circa 1980, photograph by Patrick McMullan; Richardson (right) with Boaz Mazor, circa 1975, photograph by Bob Colacello.

WEEKLY WRAP UP | SEPT. 29 – OCT.3, 2014

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Dries Van Noten final show, 2014

This week on the blog we visited Bex & Arts, a Contemporary Sculpture Triennal in Switzerland; saw Bertrand Bonello at Centre Pompidou; passed by Peter Lindbergh at Gagosian Paris and Yoko Uhoda Gallery in Liège to see a show curated by Christophe Daviet-Thery; and finally ended with Neïl Beloufa at ICA in London.

PETER LINDBERGH AT GAGOSIAN PARIS

Over the course of his career, Lindbergh has taken inspiration for his photography from modern dance, early German and East European cinema and photography, as well as his own personal history, resulting in a bold, elemental photographic language. With a minimum of artifice, spare styling, and openness to improvisation, he allows the innate character and natural beauty of his female subjects to emerge.

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Until November 12.
4 rue de Ponthieu
Paris 75008

 

PARIS PHOTO LOS ANGELES: REVIEW

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Stephen Shore, Winslow, Arizona, September 19, 2013, 2013 (printed 2014), Chromogenic color print, 16 x 20″
303 Gallery, New York

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Stephen Shore: From Galilee to the Negev, monograph by Phaidon
303 Gallery, New York

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Stephen Shore book signing at 303 Gallery

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top: Bruce Conner, MABUHAY DRESSING ROOM: BROKEN WALL, JULY 1978
bottom: Bruce Conner, EMPTY BOTTLES, UNUSED EQUIPMENT, NOV 19, 1979
Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco

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New York City backlot at Paramount Pictures!

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Miroslav Tichý
Guido Costa Projects, Turin

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William Eggleston, Untitled, 1960-1972, 16 x 20 inch Gelatin Silver Print
Rosegallery, Santa Monica

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Aperture in a storefront in the New York City backlot at Paramount Pictures

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Brian Bress, Nicks’ Other Knickknacks, 2012
Collage on archival inkjet print, 19.5 x 13 inches
Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles

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Punk and i-D
Librairie 213, Paris

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Man Ray, Photographies 1920-1936, Editions Cahiers d’Art Paris
Librairie 213, Paris

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Moi Ver, Paris, Editions Jeanne Walter, Paris, 1931
Librairie 213

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Jason Evans, Pictures for looking at
Printed Matter, New York

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Jason Evans, Pictures for looking at
Printed Matter, New York

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Printed Matter, New York

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plantlife / los angeles by Amanda Marsalis
Miniature Garden, 2014
Printed Matter, New York

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Taryn Simon book signing
Gagosian Gallery

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Dennis Hopper, Jasper Johns, 1965
Silver Gelatin Print, 24 x 16 inches
Gagosian Gallery
Dennis Hopper: Tribute