Tag Archives: Galerie Buchholz

LAWLER, QUAYTMAN, AND ROWLAND AT BUCHHOLZ

When Metro Pictures asked me to do a show in 1982, they already had an image. They represented a group of artists whose work often dealt with issues of appropriation and was often spoken of and written about together. A gallery generates meaning through the type of work they choose to show. I self-consciously made work that “looked like” Metro Pictures. The first thing you saw when you entered my show, Arrangements of Pictures, was an arrangement of works the gallery had on hand by “gallery artists” Robert Longo, Cindy Sherman, Jack Goldstein, Laurie Simmons, and James Welling. A wall label titled it “Arranged by Louise Lawler.” It was for sale as a work with a price determined by adding up the prices of the individual pieces, plus a percentage for me. I went to the collectors to whom Metro had sold work and photographed the Metro artists’ works in those contexts. I printed the resulting images a “normal” picture size and titled them “arrangements,” too—for example, “Arranged by Barbara and Eugene Schwartz, New York City.” The Metro situation at that time formed that work, and it also formed a way of working for me. — Louise Lawler*

Invited to exhibit together for the first time, Louise Lawler, R. H. Quaytman, and Cameron Rowland present new work along with selected older pieces for a group show in Cologne, now in its final week.

LOUISE LAWLER, R. H. QUAYTMAN, CAMERON ROWLAND

Through October 24.

Galerie Buchholz

Neven-DuMont-Strasse 17, Cologne.

*“Prominence Given, Authority Taken: An Interview with Louise Lawler by Douglas Crimp,” in Louise Lawler: An Arrangement of Pictures (New York: Assouline, 2000).

Louise Lawler, R. H. Quaytman, Cameron Rowland, Galerie Buchholz, September 4, 2020–October 24, 2020, from top: Louise Lawler, Water to Skin (catalogue size), 2016/2017, digital Fujiflex print face mounted to Plexiglas on museum box (The Swimming Pool, 1952, Henri Matisse, gouache on paper, cut and pasted on painted paper, installed as nine panels in two parts on burlap-covered walls, photographed at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City); Louise Lawler, Water to Skin (traced), 2016/2020, vinyl adhesive wall material (the work is as a tracing by Jon Buller available as a PDF vector file for production and installation at any scale as an adhesive wall graphic); Louise Lawler, Corner (distorted for the times, perturbée), 2014/2018, digital Fujiflex print face mounted to Plexiglas on museum box (A work by Jean-Michel Basquiat photographed at Yvon Lambert’s office, 108 Rue Vieille du Temple, Paris); Cameron Rowland, Management, 2020, time horn clock; Cameron Rowland, Out of Sight, 2020, 19th-century slave iron, 19th-century slave iron with missing rattle; R.H. Quaytman, Spine, Chapter 20 [Fraser, Anastas, Lawler], 2010, oil, silkscreen ink and gesso on wood (featuring the silkscreened image of Andrea Fraser viewing Louise Lawler’s The Princess, Now the Queen—utilized in four paintings from Painters Without Paintings and Paintings Without Painters, Chapter 8, 2006—combined with a second silkscreened image of Rhea Anastas—utilized in two paintings from Ark, Chapter 10, 2008. Two black bars and the cropping orthogonal of the Andy Warhol painting in Louise Lawler’s photo delimit the silkscreened imagery along with overpainting in Marshall’s photo oils. Down the center is a line of red, green and blue. This line was placed on all paintings in Chapter 20 that reused a silkscreen for a second time.); R.H. Quaytman, + ×, Chapter 34 [V], 2018, indigo distemper and gesso on wood; Louise Lawler, Position (noun), 1982/2020, gelatin silver print, installation view. Images courtesy and © the artists and Galerie Buchholz.

ARTISTS FOR BIDEN FUNDRAISER

Over 100 artists and estates have donated works for a fundraiser supporting Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.* Presented on Platform.art—an initiative developed by David Zwirner—participating galleries include Regen Projects, Jack Shainman, Gladstone, Lehmann Maupin, Petzel, and Marian Goodman, as well as Gemini G.E.L.

Following a virtual kickoff earlier this week with vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris, Carrie Mae Weems, and Catherine Opie, the sale is now live. See link below for details.

ARTISTS FOR BIDEN

October 2–October 8, 2020.

Platform.art

*Participating artists and estates include Marina Adams, Doug Aitken, Richard Aldrich, John Baldessari (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alvin Baltrop, Walead Beshty, McArthur Binion, Dike Blair, Sebastian Blanck, Carol Bove, Cecily Brown, George Condo, Patricia Cronin, Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Tara Donovan, Carroll Dunham, Marcel Dzama, William Eggleston, Rafa Esparza, Shepard Fairey, Rochelle Feinstein, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa​, Spencer Finch, Suzan Frecon, Charles Gaines, Jerrell Gibbs, Sam Gilliam, Joanne Greenbaum, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, Thomas Hager, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Tyler Haughey, Michael Heizer, Carmen Herrera, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Jenny Holzer, Ridley Howard, Alex Hubbard, John Huggins, Ayana V. Jackson, Rashid Johnson, Deborah Kass, KAWS, Ellsworth Kelly, Jon Kessler, Toba Khedoori, Christine Sun Kim, Jeff Koons, Doron Langberg, Liz Larner, Bonnie Lautenberg, An-My Lê, Roy Lichtenstein, Maya Lin, Robert Longo, Emmanuel Lubezki, Brice Marden, Julie Mehretu, Marilyn Minter, Ivan Morley, Rebecca Morris, Vik Muniz, Wangechi Mutu, Jordan Nassar, Alice Neel, Shirin Neshat, Catherine Opie, Angel Otero, Jack Pierson, Lari Pittman, Martin Puryear, Christina Quarles, Robert Rauschenberg (donated by Gemini G.E.L.), Alexis Rockman, Ugo Rondinone, Victoria Roth, Ed Ruscha, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Fred Sandback, Fanny Sanín, Kenny Scharf, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Amy Sillman, Gary Simmons, Laurie Simmons, Xaviera Simmons, Vaughn Spann, Tavares Strachan, Sarah Sze, Mika Tajima, Kyle Thurman, Fred Tomaselli, Leo Villareal, Charline von Heyl, Carrie Mae Weems, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Stanley Whitney, Kehinde Wiley, Chloe Wise, Christopher Wool, Rob Wynne, Lisa Yuskavage, and Andrea Zittel.

From top: Carrie Mae WeemsRemember to Dream, 2020, screenprint on rag paper, printed by Kaleb Hunkele of Standard Art Supply, image courtesy and © the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Michael Heizer, Blue Diorite, 1981, 89-lb. blue diorite in aluminum frame, image © Michael Heizer, courtesy Agnes Gund, the artist, and Gagosian, photograph by Rob McKeever, donated by a private collector; Carol BoveCoy Satanism, 2020, stainless steel and urethane paint, image courtesy and © the artist and David Zwirner; Liz Larner, Fictile, 2010–2011, ceramic and epoxy, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Kyle Thurman, Suggested Occupation 56 (Spring Image, travel nightly), 2020, gouache, graphite, and watercolor on paper in artist’s frame, image courtesy and © the artist and David Lewis; Charline von Heyl, The Sticky Hour, 2018, acrylic and crayon on linen, image courtesy and © the artist and Petzel Gallery; Tavares StrachanWe Are in This Together (Multi),, 2019, neon and transformers, image courtesy and © the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery; Jenny Holzer, selection from Truisms: Abuse of power comes as no surprise, 2015, dark labradorite footstool, image courtesy and © the artist and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Sam Gilliam, Untitled, 2020, watercolor on washi paper, image courtesy and © the artist and David Kordansky Gallery; KAWS, Together, 2017, painted bronze, image courtesy and © the artist; Alvin Baltrop, The Piers (profile portrait), n.d., gelatin silver print, image courtesy and © the Alvin Baltrop Trust, Third Streaming, and Galerie Buchholz; Lari Pittman, Portrait of a Human (Pathos, Ethos, Logos, Kairos #17), 2018, cel vinyl and spray paint on linen on wood panel, image courtesy and © the artist and Regen Projects; Ed RuschaWe (#1), dry pigment and acrylic on paper, 2020, image courtesy and © the artist.

JUTTA KOETHER — EARLY WORKS

I have always been interested in the potentials of misunderstandings. — Jutta Koether

A show of early work by Jutta Koether is on view in Berlin for two more weeks.

 JUTTA KOETHER—EARLY WORKS 1982–1992

Through January 25.

Galerie Buchholz

Fasanenstrasse 30, Berlin.

Jutta Koether, Early Works 1982–1992, Galerie Buchholz, November 22, 2019–January 25, 2020, from top: Permanently Pale, 1983, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1984, charcoal on paper; Untitled, 1982, collage, acrylic and felt-tip pen on paper; Untitled, 1988, oil on canvas; Instant of Instinct, 1984, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1983, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1983, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1983, oil on canvas; Straight Girl, 1984, oil on canvas; Massen, 1991, oil on canvas; Massen, 1991, oil on canvas; You and Me Like Money and Time, 1985, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1986, oil on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist and Galerie Buchholz.

TONY CONRAD WRITINGS LAUNCH

I want art to stand strong, to display how it manipulates its audience. I want it to take up their expectations, their sense of the world, their predispositions toward the way they think or use their language, and then to use these things perversely, politically, colorfully, “expressively.” Tony Conrad

Join TONY CONRAD WRITINGS co-editor Andrew Lampert for a conversation with Conrad documentarian Tyler Hubby and Tosh Berman at Artbook at Hauser & Wirth in Los Angeles.*

TONY CONRAD WRITINGS LAUNCH

Saturday, January 4, at 3 pm.

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth

917 East 3rd Street, downtown Los Angeles.

*Tony Conrad Writings was co-edited by Constance DeJong.

From top: Tony Conrad performing Bowed Film, 1974, image credit Greene Naftali, Galerie Buchholz, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Tony Conrad Writings, cover and inside images (3), image credit Primary Information.

ANNE IMHOF AT TATE MODERN

Chapter 1 of SEX—the new exhibition by Anne Imhof—will be up at Tate Modern through the end of this month.

The durational performance component of the show can be seen three more times in the Tanks, beginning on Thursday.

(Chapters 2 and 3 will take place in Chicago—in late May—and in Turin in 2020.)

ANNE IMHOF—SEX

Through Sunday, March 31.

Performances in the Tanks:

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, March 28, 29, and 30.

6:30 pm to 10:30 pm.

Tate Modern

Bankside, South Bank, London.

From top: Mickey Mahar (foreground head) and Josh Johnson in rehearsal for Anne Imhof—Sex at Tate Modern, 2019; Eliza Douglas, rehearsal; rehearsal group; Sacha Eusebe, rehearsal. Photographs by Nadine Fraczkowski, courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin, Cologne, and New York, © Nadine Fraczkowski.