Tag Archives: Getty Center

BAUHAUS — BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST

In conjunction with BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, open for one more week at Getty Center, BAUHAUS—BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST is an online exhibition that “offers an in-depth look into the school’s novel pedagogy.”*

Following the end of World War I, the provisional government of the short-lived Free State of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach in Germany initiated an effort to reestablish two schools, the Weimar School of Applied Arts (Weimar Kunstgewerbeschule) and the neighboring Academy of Fine Arts (Hochschule für bildende Kunst), as a single, unified institution…

Upon the recommendation of Belgian architect Henry van de Velde, who had previously directed the Weimar School of Applied Arts, the Berlin architect Walter Gropius was invited to head the new school. Gropius’ request to rechristen the institution under a new name, BAUHAUS STATE SCHOOL (Staatliches Bauhaus), was approved in March 1919.*

BAUHAUS—BUILDING THE NEW ARTIST*

Online exhibition in conjunction with

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Postcard sent to Jan Tschichold with aerial photograph of Bauhaus Dessau, Walter Gropius, architect, 1926, photograph by Junkers Luftbild, 1926, gelatin silver print on postcard, Jan and Edith Tschichold Papers, 1899–1979; Vassily Kandinsky, Color Triangle, circa 1925–1933, graphite and gouache on paper, Vassily Kandinsky Papers, 1911–1940; students in a workshop at the Bauhaus Dessau (2), photographer(s) unknown, undated, gelatin silver prints; Erich Mzozek, Still-life drawing with analytical overlay, circa 1930, graphite on paper and vellum, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Geometric study of spiral form, artist unknown, undated, graphite and colored graphite on paper; Friedl Dicker, Light-dark contrast study for Johannes Itten’s Preliminary Course, 1919, charcoal and pastel collage on black paper. ; Pamphlet for Farben Licht-Spiele (Color-light plays), Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack, 1925, letterpress, Bauhaus Typography Collection, 1919–1937, © Kaj Delugan; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek. All images courtesy and © the Bauhaus-Archiv and the Getty Research Institute.

JUDY CHICAGO — LOS ANGELES

A survey of Judy Chicago’s work from 1965 to 1972—made in Los Angeles and Fresno State College, where, in 1970, she developed the first feminist art program in the United States—is now on view at Jeffrey Deitch.

This [exhibition, JUDY CHICAGO—LOS ANGELES,] has enormous meaning to me because we’re not only doing a comprehensive show of different aspects of my early work—painting, sculpture, fireworks, installations—and all of that has never really been put together before, but you’re also doing it in a Frank Gehry-designed building. Gehry was my first landlord in Santa Monica, and his sister married my first gallerist. Frank was not particularly interested in women artists at that time—I don’t know if he ever was…

And, as you know, I had a really difficult time in the first two decades of my career. Some of the sculptures that are going to be in the show are being reconstructed because I had to destroy them: I just couldn’t afford to store that much work. I stored some early work, fortunately, which the Getty curators unearthed for Pacific Standard Time—that began the process of people looking at my early work…

Even though I had a really difficult time in the L.A. arts scene—which was very inhospitable to women—still, L.A. nurtured me, and I feel like the foundations of my work are in what I did in that first decade and a half of professional practice in California: the development of my formal language, my color systems, my approach to and interest in a wide variety of materials…

Also, doing this show is bringing a lot of memories back, some of which were simply too painful for me to deal with at the time. Had I really acknowledged them or dealt with them, I probably would have given up. I had such a hard time and faced so much rejection and misunderstanding. Still, when I went to auto-body school, I learned for the first time that making art involved making physical objects, and I learned a sense of craft that I never had—about how you do things. I had a teacher at the auto-body school who said to me: “Judy, there’s no such thing as perfection. There’s only the illusion of perfection, and I’m going to teach you how to achieve that.”Judy Chicago, interview with Jeffrey Deitch, Purple 32

JUDY CHICAGO—LOS ANGELES

Through November 2.

Jeffrey Deitch

925 North Orange Drive, Los Angeles.

Judy Chicago, from top: Immolation, 1972, from Women and Smoke, photograph by Donald WoodmanARS, New York, printed 2019, ChromaLuxe metal print on aluminum; Birth Hood, 1965-2011, spray paint on hood of Corvair, courtesy of Salon 94 Gallery, New York, ADAGP 2018; Trinity, 1965/2019, Matthews polyurethane paint on stainless steel; Orange Atmosphere, 1968, courtesy of Through the Flower Archives; Pale Green Domes with Solid Core, 1968, sprayed acrylic lacquer on successive formed clear acrylic domes, courtesy of Salon 94 Gallery and the Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco, photograph by Woodman, ARS, New York; Sky Flesh, 1971, sprayed acrylic lacquer on acrylic; Pink Atmosphere, 1971, Cal State Fullerton, photograph by Woodman, ARS, New York, printed 2019, ChromaLuxe metal print on aluminum; Pasadena Lifesavers Red Series #2, 1969–1970, sprayed acrylic lacquer on acrylic, photograph by Woodman, ARS, New York; Flight Hood, 1965/2011, spray paint on hood of Corvair, courtesy of Salon 94 Gallery, ADAGP 2018. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, the publishers, and Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles.

SAN CHA AT THE GETTY

San Cha will perform this weekend at the Getty Center as part of the Off the 405 program. Admission is free; no reservations required.

“Following the release of her record CAPRICHO DEL DIABLO in 2018, San Cha was tapped by the Red Bull Music Academy to kick off their 2019 Los Angeles music festival. There, she debuted a two-act multimedia performance at the Vibiana, inspired by the melodramatic telenovelas she devoured as a child.

“With a romance, a wedding, and a betrayal, this theatrical concert will be re-envisioned for the Getty Center courtyard stage, and double as a celebration of San Cha’s forthcoming album of new music. Special guests and DJs will start the party for what will be an over-the-top and unforgettable performance.”*

SAN CHA*

Saturday, August 24, at 6 pm.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

San Cha. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, and the Getty. Below: San Cha in performance, August 24, 2019, Getty Center. Image courtesy and © @laura_luna via Instagram.

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.

LUCY LIPPARD — TACITA DEAN — EDWARD RANNEY

“I was always pro-artist because I was well aware that what I knew about art I learned from artists—not from criticism… [Robert Smithson] went to Max’s Kansas City every other night, and he’d bring a question to be discussed; he’d come ready to talk. I was there rarely, but I love to argue, so I’d argue with him… I liked him, but I always said he was a more important writer than he was an artist, and that pissed him off—for good reason, I guess.” — Lucy Lippard*

Following a Getty Center screening of Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty and Charles and Ray Eames’s Powers of Ten—in conjunction with an exhibition on monumentalityTacita Dean, Edward Ranney, and writer-activist Lucy Lippard will talk about their engagement with land art.

“I’ve always liked what feels like the impossibility of writing about images, and I always welcome the chance to mess around with form in ways that try to address that… Writing parallel to art, or collaborating with it, is what I’ve been trying to do, and it’s certainly more fun than just acting alone.” — Lippard*

(Lippard and Ranney collaborated on the books Down Country and The Lines.)

MONUMENTALITY AND COSMIC SCALE

LUCY LIPPARD, TACITA DEAN, and EDWARD RANNEY

Saturday, March 9, at 2 pm.

Getty Center

Harold M. Williams Auditorium

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Lucy Lippard,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 288, 289, 302–303.

From top: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Lucy Lippard, from the series Art World, 1982, gelatin silver print, © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Studio International, July/August 1970; Tacita Dean, JG (offset) (detail), 2013, set of fourteen handmade offset prints, the Getty Research Institute, courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, Frith Street Gallery, London, and Niels Borch Jensen Edition, Berlin and Copenhagen, © Tacita Dean; Edward Ranney, Ollantaytambo, Peru, 1975, © Edward Ranney, courtesy of the artist.