Tag Archives: Getty Center

SAN CHA AT THE GETTY

San Cha will perform this weekend at the Getty Center as part of the Off the 405 program. Admission is free; no reservations required.

“Following the release of her record CAPRICHO DEL DIABLO in 2018, San Cha was tapped by the Red Bull Music Academy to kick off their 2019 Los Angeles music festival. There, she debuted a two-act multimedia performance at the Vibiana, inspired by the melodramatic telenovelas she devoured as a child.

“With a romance, a wedding, and a betrayal, this theatrical concert will be re-envisioned for the Getty Center courtyard stage, and double as a celebration of San Cha’s forthcoming album of new music. Special guests and DJs will start the party for what will be an over-the-top and unforgettable performance.”*

SAN CHA*

Saturday, August 24, at 6 pm.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

San Cha. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, and the Getty. Below: San Cha in performance, August 24, 2019, Getty Center. Image courtesy and © @laura_luna via Instagram.

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS AT THE GETTY

“The aim is an alliance of the arts under the wing of great architecture.” — Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS, now at the Getty Center, celebrates the centenary of the founding of the school in Weimar.

The exhibition “reexamines the founding principles of this landmark institution,” considering the school’s “early dedication to spiritual expression and its development of a curriculum based on elements deemed fundamental to all forms of artistic practice.”*

BAUHAUS BEGINNINGS*

Through October 13.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

From top: Léna Bergner, Durchdringung (Penetration) for Paul Klee‘s course, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Walter Gropius, undated photograph by Lucia Moholy, © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Gerd Balzer, Color wheel for Vassily Kandinsky’s Preliminary Course, 1929, gouache on paper, pasted on black paper; Material exercises in paper (2), photographs by Alfred Ehrhardt, circa 1928–1929, © Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung; Erich Mzozek, Study for Vassily Kandinsky’s Farbenlehre (Course on color), circa 1929–1930, collage with gouache on paper, © Estate Erich Mrozek; Léna Bergner, Carpet design, circa 1925–1932, © the heirs of Léna Bergner; Joost Schmidt, Form and color study, circa 1929–1930; Benita Koch-Otte, Einfamilienwohnhaus auf der Ausstellung des Staatlichen Bauhauses (Single-family house at the exhibition of the State Bauhaus), 1923, Georg Muche, architect, 1923, from Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919–1923 (Munich: Bauhausverlag, 1923), p. 165, courtesy and © Bodelschwingh Foundation Bethel; Lyonel Feininger, Villa am Strand (Villa on the shore), 1921, from Bauhaus Drucke: Neue Europaeische Graphik, Erste Mappe [first portfolio], Meister d. Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar (Potsdam: Müller, 1921), © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Ringl + Pit (Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach), Bald Head (Johannes Itten), 1930, printed 1985, The Jewish Museum, © Ringl + Pit, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Hilde Reindl, Color wheel and tone study for Paul Klee’s Course, circa 1927. Images courtesy of the Getty Research Institute.

LUCY LIPPARD — TACITA DEAN — EDWARD RANNEY

“I was always pro-artist because I was well aware that what I knew about art I learned from artists—not from criticism… [Robert Smithson] went to Max’s Kansas City every other night, and he’d bring a question to be discussed; he’d come ready to talk. I was there rarely, but I love to argue, so I’d argue with him… I liked him, but I always said he was a more important writer than he was an artist, and that pissed him off—for good reason, I guess.” — Lucy Lippard*

Following a Getty Center screening of Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty and Charles and Ray Eames’s Powers of Ten—in conjunction with an exhibition on monumentalityTacita Dean, Edward Ranney, and writer-activist Lucy Lippard will talk about their engagement with land art.

“I’ve always liked what feels like the impossibility of writing about images, and I always welcome the chance to mess around with form in ways that try to address that… Writing parallel to art, or collaborating with it, is what I’ve been trying to do, and it’s certainly more fun than just acting alone.” — Lippard*

(Lippard and Ranney collaborated on the books Down Country and The Lines.)

MONUMENTALITY AND COSMIC SCALE

LUCY LIPPARD, TACITA DEAN, and EDWARD RANNEY

Saturday, March 9, at 2 pm.

Getty Center

Harold M. Williams Auditorium

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

*Jarrett Earnest, “Lucy Lippard,” in What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2018), 288, 289, 302–303.

From top: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Lucy Lippard, from the series Art World, 1982, gelatin silver print, © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Studio International, July/August 1970; Tacita Dean, JG (offset) (detail), 2013, set of fourteen handmade offset prints, the Getty Research Institute, courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, Frith Street Gallery, London, and Niels Borch Jensen Edition, Berlin and Copenhagen, © Tacita Dean; Edward Ranney, Ollantaytambo, Peru, 1975, © Edward Ranney, courtesy of the artist.

ON ROMARE BEARDEN

At Getty Center and at CAAM, Mary Schmidt Campbell will discuss the artist and his times at the center of her new book AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY: THE LIFE AND WORK OF ROMARE BEARDEN.

Bearden’s work will be on view at The Broad in the upcoming exhibition SOUL OF A NATION—ART IN THE AGE OF BLACK POWER, 1963–1983.

MARY SCHMIDT CAMPBELL—AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY

Thursday, February 28, at 11 am.

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

Sunday, March 3, from 6 pm to 8 pm.

California African American Museum

600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles.

Also see Ralph Ellison, “The Art of Romare Bearden,” in Art in America, 1945–1970: Writings from the Age of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and Minimalism, edited by Jed Perl (New York: Library of America, 2014), 701–710.

From top: Romare BeardenRiver Mist ,1962, © Romare Bearden Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York; Bearden (left) with Ernest Crichlow (standing with glass) and Norman Lewis (seated far right), co-founders of the Cinque Gallery, courtesy Romare Bearden Foundation; Romare Bearden, Sha-ba, 1970, collage on paper, cloth, and synthetic polymer paint on composition board, photograph by Allen Phillips, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art; Romare Bearden, Pittsburgh Memory, 1964 (detail), mixed media collage and graphite on board, © Romare Bearden Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York.

ASPECTS OF GLOBAL PERFORMANCE IN THE 1970S

Columbia University professor Kellie Jones will discuss “the global reaches of performance art during the 1970s through the lens of projects by Latin American and African American artists”—including Adrian Piper, Senga NengudiFelipe Ehrenberg, Lourdes Grobet, and David Lamelas—and considers “the circumstances that allowed performance to be dispersed effortlessly into the flow of everyday life.”*

KELLIE JONES—SIGNS OF LIFE

ASPECTS OF GLOBAL PERFORMANCE IN THE 1970s*

Tuesday, December 4, at 7:30 pm.

Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles.

See “Making Doors: Linda Goode Bryant in conversation with Senga Nengudi,” Ursula 1 (Winter 2018).

Top: David Lamelas, Office of Information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text and Audio, 1968. Image credit: MoMA.

Above: Felipe Ehrenberg performance.

Below: Lourdes Grobet, Horas y media, 1975. © Lourdes Grobet.