Tag Archives: Hans Ulrich Obrist

LUCHITA HURTADO —JUST DOWN THE STREET

If I have a voice at all, I’m going to use it… to complain [laughter]. Because it’s the only way that you get anything done. — Luchita Hurtado*

The exhibition LUCHITA HURTADO—JUST DOWN THE STREET is now open in Zürich. The show brings together the artist’s drawings and paintings on paper from the 1960s.

LUCHITA HURTADO—JUST DOWN THE STREET

Through July 31.

Hauser & Wirth

Limmatstrasse 270, Zürich.

*Hurtado and Hans Ulrich Obrist in conversation at LACMA, February 2020.

Luchita Hurtado, from top: Untitled, 1965, acrylic on paper; Just Down the Street, 1965, oil on paper; Portrait, 1965 / 1968, oil on paper; Luchita Hurtado—Just Down the Street, May 11, 2020–July 31, 2020, installation view; Untitled, circa 1957 / 1968, oil and conte on paper; Untitled, 1968, oil and graphite on paper. Artwork photographs by Jeff McLane. Images courtesy and © 2020 the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

TORKWASE DYSON AND HANS ULRICH OBRIST

This week, Pace Gallery’s Art Matters program features a live Instagram conversation between Torkwase Dyson and Hans Ulrich Obrist.

TORKWASE DYSON and HANS ULRICH OBRIST IN CONVERSATION

Wednesday, April 1.

2pm on the West Coast, 5 pm East Coast.

From top: Torkwase Dyson, photograph by Gabe Souza; Dyson, Plantationocene (Black Water 1919), 2019, acrylic, graphite, string, wood, ink on canvas. Images courtesy and © the artist, the photographers, and Pace Gallery. Hans Ulrich Obrist, photograph by Brigitte Lacombe, courtesy and © the photographer and subject.

LUCHITA HURTADO AND HANS ULRICH OBRIST

The most interesting thing for me now is to make sure that the planet is going in the right direction. I keep the words sky, water, earth, fire in my mind. Those are the elements, and that’s what my work has come to be about. That’s what I’m about… When I think about my painting and the political and the planet, it’s about the hope that it’s not too late and that people can still get together and in whatever small way make a difference that adds up. As far as physical strength and ability goes, I’m very weak, of course, because of my age, but I still can paint, I can still draw. And so that’s my contribution…

I enjoy life, and I feel I’ve been different people. I was a different person, for example, when I did these very sexy drawings and paintings of my body, looking at my body. [Laughs] It’s the truth. Sex was all I could think about…

When I used to go to my house in Taos, New Mexico, and go to watch tribal dances, they wouldn’t ask me if I was Indian; they would say, “What tribe are you?” I would say, “Venezuelan.’”And they’d say, “I’ve never heard of that one!”… Within myself, I felt that I was Indian. I felt that very much when I went to the dances, because the tribes had a complete attitude towards the earth, that it was alive. I remember asking why the dances in the winter were different from the summer dances. A lot of stomping went on in the summer. I asked a man about this once, and he said, “Because the earth is asleep, of course, in winter.” Instead of stomping, they drag the foot, so as not to wake the earth. It’s an attitude toward the planet as a living thing.Luchita Hurtado*

Frieze Los Angeles brings Hans Ulrich Obrist to the city for a conversation with Hurtado, who worked with the curator on her retrospective I LIVE I DIE I WILL BE REBORN—which opens at LACMA on February 16..

The discussion will be moderated by Jennifer King, associate curator of Contemporary Projects at LACMA.

LUCHITA HURTADO and HANS ULRICH OBRIST IN CONVERSATION

Saturday, February 15, at 2 pm.

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.

*“The Painter and the Planetarian: Luchita Hurtado in Conversation with Andrea Bowers,” Ursula 2 (Spring 2019).

Also see the monograph I LIVE I DIE I WILL BE REBORN.

Luchita Hurtado, from top: Untitled, 1973, oil on canvas and thread, photograph by Brian Forrest; Encounter, 1971, oil on canvas; Untitled, 1975, oil on canvas, photograph by Jeff McLane; Untitled, 1971, photograph by McLane; The Umbilical Cord of the Earth is the Moon, 1977, oil on canvas, photograph by McLane; Untitled, circa 1951, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, photograph by Genevieve Hanson; Untitled, 1972, oil on canvas, photograph by Hanson; Luchita Hurtado—I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn monograph cover, image courtesy and © Walther König.

Photograph of Luchita Hurtado by Man Ray, 1947, courtesy and © Man Ray 2015 Trust/Artists Rights Society, New York / Adagp, Paris. Artwork images courtesy and © Hurtado and Hauser & Wirth.

MARIA LASSNIG — NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980—restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation and the Austrian Film Museum—comprise live-action and documentary footage, and “enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.” (New York Diary)

These films were largely never finished, nor shown in the artist’s lifetime, which perhaps accounts for their frankness, a type of elucidate meditation on the artistic process, life in the studio, and the psychologies, lives, and bodies of Lassnig’s friends and colleagues. As such, the films of this period become essential to understanding the shift within Lassnig’s practice, which occurred around 1970 following the artist’s move to New York from Vienna in 1968, to be “in the country of strong women.”* Shifting her focus from the personal to that of the body and its relations, her reaction to the sensory overload of Manhattan was not so much an abandonment of an earlier practice of “body sensation” drawings and the subsequent “body awareness” paintings, but rather a redefinition of a transposed body within a cultural and civic environment.**Mary L. Coyne

MARIA LASSNIG—NEW YORK FILMS 1970–1980

Friday, December 6, at 12:15 pm.

Arthouse Piccadilly

Mühlebachstrasse 2, Zürich.

*Maria LassnigThe Pen is the Sister of the Brush: Diaries 1943-1997, edited by Hans Ulrich Obrist (Göttingen: Steidl; Zürich: Hauser and Wirth, 2009).

**Wolfgang Dreschler, “About the intimate link between the pained and the painter,” in Maria Lassnig (Vienna: Museum moderner Kunst, Ludwig Foundation, 1999).

Maria Lassnig, from top: Kopf (circa 1976); Stonelifting: A Self Portrait in Progress (1971–1974) (2); Moonlanding / Janus Head (1971–1972). Images courtesy and © the Maria Lassnig Foundation.

ON LYOTARD’S IMMATÉRIAUX

This weekend, join Daniel Birnbaum, Sven-Olov Wallenstein, Hans-Ulrich Obrist, and Koo Jeong A in conversation at Frieze London for the launch of Birnbaum and Wallenstein’s new Sternberg Press book SPACING PHILOSOPHY: LYOTARD AND THE IDEA OF THE EXHIBITION.

Birnbaum and Koo will also be in Berlin a week later.

“In 1985, the philosopher Jean-François Lyotard curated Les Immatériaux at Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. Though widely misunderstood at the time, the exhibition marked a ‘curatorial turn’ in critical theory. Through its experimental layout and hybrid presentation of objects, technologies, and ideas, this pioneering exploration of virtuality reflected on the exhibition as a medium of communication, and anticipated a deeper engagement with immersive and digital space in both art and theory. SPACING PHILOSOPHY analyzes the significance and logic of Lyotard’s exhibition while contextualizing it in the history of exhibition practices, the philosophical tradition, and Lyotard’s own work on aesthetics and phenomenology. Les Immatériaux can thus be seen as a culmination and materialization of a life’s work as well as a primer for the many thought-exhibitions produced in the following decades.”*

DANIEL BIRNBAUM SVEN-OLOV WALLENSTEIN, HANS-ULRICH OBRIST, and KOO JEONG A IN CONVERSATION*

Friday, October 4, at 4 pm.

König Galerie Booth (B2), Frieze London

Regent’s Park, London.

DANIEL BIRNBAUM and KOO JEONG A IN CONVERSATION

Sunday, October 13, at 3 pm.

Julia Stoschek Collection

Leipziger Strasse 60, Berlin.

See “Ontologies of the Virtual,” an interview with Birnbaum and Wallenstein.

From top: Jean-François Lyotard; 1985 exhibition poster, designed by Grafibus, image courtesy and © Grafibus and Centre Pompidou; book cover image courtesy and © Sternberg Press.