Tag Archives: Haus der Kunst de Munich

OKWUI ENWEZOR

“We knew it was coming but the finality of his passing makes it even more devastating. Okwui was this enormously prophetic figure, wise beyond his years, whose insights—vision, if you will—literally shaped the universe many of us now inhabit. He was like an enormous tree in the glare, whose shadow provided refuge, hospitality, generosity, and love for so many.” — John Akomfrah

Okwui Enwezor—the great historian, curator, writer, editor, and former artistic director of Haus der Kunst—has died in Munich following four years of cancer treatment.

Enwezor, who was 55 at the time of his death, is celebrated for his paradigm-shifting directorship of Documenta 11 in 2002, and the 56th Venice BiennaleAll the World’s Futures—in 2015.

A writer and editor in demand, Enwezor’s contributions will live on in the work of the artists he championed.

From top: Contemporary African Art Since 1980 (2009), by Okwui Enwezor and Chika Okeke-Agulu, image courtesy Damiani; John Akomfrah: Signs of Empire (2018), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy the New Museum; Candice Breitz: The Scripted Life (2010), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Kunsthaus Bregenz; Recent Histories: Contemporary African Photography and Video Art from the Walther Collection (2017), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Steidl and the Walther Collection; Gary Simmons: Paradise (2012), conversation with Enwezor, image courtesy Damiani; Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff (2014), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Ludion; Lyle Ashton Harris: Excessive Exposure (2010), text by Enwezor, image courtesy Gregory R. Miller & Co.; Home Lands–Land Marks: Contemporary Art from South Africa (2009), contributing text by Enwezor, image courtesy Haunch of Venison.

ON JÖRG IMMENDORFF

“One day, I entered one of [Immendorff’s] cafés—and since then there has been no end to my slipping on the glass-smooth parquet of these paintings again and again and bouncing off the tables.” — Catherine Millet

Critic, editor, and memoirist Millet will give a talk on Jörg Immendorff, followed by a Q & A with curator and critic Thibaut de Ruyter.

CATHERINE MILLET A PARIS
AOUT 2017

GESAMTKUNSTWERK IN THE STYLE OF JÖRG IMMENDORFF—

A LECTURE BY CATHERINE MILLET

Tuesday, January 22, at 7 pm.

Haus der Kunst

Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

From top: Jörg Immendorff, Café Deutschland: Contemplating The Question—Where Do I Stand?, 1987, oil on canvas; Catherine Millet in 2017, photograph by Jean-Francois Robert.

VIVAN SUNDARAM

The retrospective of the paintings, drawings, photographs, found-object constructions, and videos of Vivan Sundaram at Haus der Kunst will be up through early October.

“Politics and poetics, ethics and aesthetics: the continual crossing of these dimensions defines the forcefield in which the multimedia oeuvre of Sundaram has taken shape over the last fifty years.

“His artistic beginnings coincide with an emblematic date in the second half of the twentieth century: 1968, synonymous with the international protest movements of students, workers and civil rights activists… It was a moment that crystallized his conviction that an engagement with the world in all its actuality was the fundamental reason for being an artist… The collage/montage principle that he adopted early on made for a disjunctive pictorial space which put the frame under considerable pressure.”*

 

VIVAN SUNDARAM—DISJUNCTURES

Through October 7.

hausderkunst.de/vivan-sundaram-disjunctures

DEEPAK ANANTH Lecture:

VIVAN SUDARAM—LINES OF DESCENT

Thursday, September 20, at 7 pm.

hausderkunst.de/lines-of-descent-von-deepak-ananth

HAUS DER KUNST, Prinzregentenstrasse 1, Munich.

Vivan Sundaram, The Slave You Buried, 1972, ink on paper.

 

AN AFTERNOON WITH THE COLLECTOR HERMAN DALED IN BRUSSELS

Last week, I met Herman Daled in his house, Hotel Wolfers, built by the architect Henry Van de Velde in 1930 in Brussels.
I got the chance to visit his place and discuss his life as a collector, and his relationship with this masterpiece of modernism.

In the next issue of Paris-LA, coming in September, you will learn more about it!!

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Herman Daled in front of his house, Hotel Wolfers

 

Here is the first thing you see when you go into the house…

 

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“not allowed to wear heels”

 

To learn more about his collection, you can read the catalog A Bit of Matter and a Little Bit More, The Collection and Archives of Herman and Nicole Daled 1966-1978, published by Walter König.

 

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This catalog has been translated into French and published by the Wiels club and the association of La Maison Rouge.

 

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